Ballet Theatre senior company to stage ‘Cinderella’ for spring production

For Ballet Theatre of Scranton’s senior company, “Cinderella” proved to be a perfect fit.
Dancers from the studio will present the fairytale classic as their spring production on Saturday, May 4, at 2 and 7:30 p.m. at Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Tickets cost $15-$25 and can be purchased at tututix.com.
While audiences can’t expect the animated Disney version of the story, Ballet Theatre artistic director Joanne D. Arduino said they will see the close relationship between Cinderella and her father, as well as the conflict between the young girl and her stepmother.
The third act features dances that highlight Andalusian, far Eastern and other cultures that represent the prince’s journey to find who fits the slipper.
“And from there, the story holds true,” Arduino said. “He does find Cinderella and they live happily ever after.”
Selena Knowlton, who danced with Ballet Theatre up until last year, stars as Cinderella, and Jose Hurtado portrays the Prince. Both are students at the Rock School for Dance Education, Philadelphia, and “talented young dancers,” Arduino said. They are among a cast of more than 50 regional dancers plus Ballet Theatre alum Elizabeth Conway, who will dance the role of Fairy Godmother.
The show will be complete with dreamy fairy tale scenery and costumes, a life-size pumpkin coach and a technical team that includes Emmy Award-winning light designer Dennis M. Size, who frequently returns to Scranton to lend a hand with Arduino’s productions.
The production is based on the Bolshoi Ballet production in Russia and was originally staged by international ballet master (and another frequent Ballet Theatre collaborator) Henry Danton in 1994. That same year, area native Karen Keeler, creative director for the Rockettes, starred as Cinderella. The production was restaged in 2011 and Ardruino chose it again this year.
“We do a lot of the classics but it’s always nice to get back to a fairy tale,” Arduino said, adding that any little ones who come to the show are welcome to dress up in princess costumes. “It’s nice that it’s a new generation of dancers and a new generation of audiences that get to experience this ballet.”


While audiences can’t expect the animated Disney version of the story, Ballet Theatre artistic director Joanne D. Arduino said they will see the close relationship between Cinderella and her father, as well as the conflict between the young girl and her stepmother.
The third act features dances that highlight Andalusian, far Eastern and other cultures that represent the prince’s journey to find who fits the slipper.
“And from there, the story holds true,” Arduino said. “He does find Cinderella and they live happily ever after.”
Selena Knowlton, who danced with Ballet Theatre up until last year, stars as Cinderella, and Jose Hurtado portrays the Prince. Both are students at the Rock School for Dance Education, Philadelphia, and “talented young dancers,” Arduino said. They are among a cast of more than 50 regional dancers plus Ballet Theatre alum Elizabeth Conway, who will dance the role of Fairy Godmother.
The show will be complete with dreamy fairy tale scenery and costumes, a life-size pumpkin coach and a technical team that includes Emmy Award-winning light designer Dennis M. Size, who frequently returns to Scranton to lend a hand with Arduino’s productions.
The production is based on the Bolshoi Ballet production in Russia and was originally staged by international ballet master (and another frequent Ballet Theatre collaborator) Henry Danton in 1994. That same year, area native Karen Keeler, creative director for the Rockettes, starred as Cinderella. The production was restaged in 2011 and Ardruino chose it again this year.
“We do a lot of the classics but it’s always nice to get back to a fairy tale,” Arduino said, adding that any little ones who come to the show are welcome to dress up in princess costumes. “It’s nice that it’s a new generation of dancers and a new generation of audiences that get to experience this ballet.”