Live Music in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre

Live Music in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre

Clubs

 

July 24 to 30

 

Thursday, July 24
Bar on Oak, Pittston — The Tones
Chestnut Street Tavern, Dunmore — DJ Deborah
Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap — Jazz Jam w/Bill Goodwin & Friends
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Wilkes-Barre — Satisfaction (Rolling Stones tribute band )
Oak Street Express, Scranton — DJ Famous
O’Leary’s Pub, Scranton — Seamus Kennedy (8 p.m.), Open Jam w/Jerry Trapper
River Street Jazz Cafe, Plains — The Primate Fiasco
The V-Spot, Scranton — Eric Rudy
Wellington’s Pub & Eatery, Clarks Summit — Paul Laquintano

Friday, July 25
Bar on Oak, Pittston — Dan Reynolds Duo
Carl Von Luger Steak & Seafood, Scranton — The Andrews Vibe Quartet
Chestnut Street Tavern, Dunmore — Renora Code
Cooper’s on the Waterfront, Pittston — Sweet Pepper and the Long Hots
Cooper’s Seafood House, Scranton — Jigsaw Johnny
Irish Wolf Pub, Scranton — ‘80s Night w/DJ Devo Dave
JJ Bridjes Restaurant, Clarks Summit — Crimson Tears
Manhattan Drive Jazz Club, Dunmore — Take 3
Mert’s, Scranton — Black Tie Stereo
Minooka Pub, Scranton — Fuzzy Park
New Penny, Scranton — A Green August
Oak Street Express, Scranton — Couple Two Trio
O’Leary’s Pub, Scranton — Live Music TBA
Poor Richard’s Pub, Scranton — DJ Honey Do
River Street Jazz Cafe, Plains — Omnitial (Rolling Stones tribute)
Static Night Club, Scott Township — DJ Party
The V-Spot, Scranton — Destination West
Wellington’s Pub & Eatery, Clarks Summit — Brad Parks

Saturday, July 26
Backyard Ale House, Scranton — Tom Graham
Bar on Oak, Pittston — Latin Night w/Live Band
Chestnut Street Tavern, Dunmore — DJ Mongo
Cooper’s on the Waterfront, Pittston — Strawberry Jam
Cooper’s Seafood House, Scranton — Q-Balls
Harmony Presents at the Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley — Miles to Dayton
Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley — Miles to Dayton
Irish Wolf Pub, Scranton — Hip Hop Lyrical Warfare
Manhattan Drive Jazz Club, Dunmore — Gerard Mayer Trio
Mert’s, Scranton — The Chatter
Minooka Pub, Scranton — Dan Reynolds Duo
New Penny, Scranton — Cherry Pie
Oak Street Express, Scranton — DJ Famous
O’Leary’s Pub, Scranton — Live Music TBA
Poor Richard’s Pub, Scranton — DJ Honey Do
Static Night Club, Scott Township — Latin DJ Party
The Settlers Inn, Hawley — Dan Bradley (6-9 p.m.)
The V-Spot, Scranton — The Fallen
Wellington’s Pub & Eatery, Clarks Summit — DJ Global Dreams

Sunday, July 27
Bullfrog Brewery, Williamsport — B.D. Lenz
Cooper’s on the Waterfront, Pittston — Karaoke w/DJ Honey Do
Cooper’s Seafood House, Scranton — The Invisible Swordsmen
Oak Street Express, Scranton — Butch & The Kid
The V-Spot, Scranton — V-Spot Idol 3

Monday, July 28
Chestnut Street Tavern, Dunmore — DJ Deborah
Irish Wolf Pub, Scranton — Monday Night Raw hosted by The Wolf
Oak Street Express, Scranton — Open mic w/Dillon & Tyler

Tuesday, July 29
Bar on Oak, Pittston — Line dancing w/Danny Star
Chestnut Street Tavern, Dunmore — DJ Deborah
Cooper’s on the Waterfront, Pittston — Bike Night w/DJ Ringmaster
Harrington’s Pub & Grill, Olyphant — Karaoke Contest w/DJ Devil Dog
Oak Street Express, Scranton — DJ Famous
The V-Spot, Scranton — Omnitial Duo

Wednesday, July 30
Bar on Oak, Pittston — Line dancing w/Barb
Bazil, Clarks Summit — Marko Marcinko Jazz Quartet
Chestnut Street Tavern, Dunmore — Karaoke w/DJ Terryoke
Irish Wolf Pub, Scranton — Open Mic w/Jay Luke
Oak Street Express, Scranton — Karaoke w/Speaker Jam
O’Leary’s Pub, Scranton — Village Idiots
River Street Jazz Cafe, Plains — Robert Hunter after party
The V-Spot, Scranton — Kevin Vest

Things to Do in Scranton / Wilkes-Barre

Things to Do in Scranton / Wilkes-Barre

5 great things to do this week

 

July 24 to 30

 

Missing You
John Waite, former lead singer of The Babys and Bad English, plays the Keystone Grand Ballroom at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs on Friday, July 25. Doors open at 7 p.m with showtime at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20.
Lancaster, England-born rock star/balladeer/storyteller Waite struck gold in 1984 with his chart-topping solo hit “Missing You,” (Waite re-recorded the song in 2007 as a duet with bluegrass singer Alison Krauss).
In 2014, Waite is back with Best, his new greatest hits album which spans his entire 40- year career. Best features re-recorded versions of signature classics such as “Back on My Feet Again,” “Isn’t It Time,” “Missing You” and live renditions of “Head First,” “Saturday Night” and “Change.”
His music has been featured in movies such as Selena, True Romance, Days of Thunder and Vision Quest, as well as the first episode of Miami Vice and the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City. — tg

 

Badfish to the bone
In the spirit of Bradley Nowell and the music of Sublime, Badfish — a tribute to Sublime — is ready to light up the Sherman Theater Summer Concert Stage at Mt. Airy Casino Resort, Mt. Pocono, on Saturday, July 26 with “Beers, Burgers and Badfish.” Tickets for the all-ages show range from $20 to $26. Showtime is 4 p.m.
The reggae-surf-rock-punk band Sublime ended with the untimely death of lead singer, guitarist and songwriter Brad Nowell, in 1996. Badfish continues to carry the torch left in the extended absence of the original band (the original members of Sublime have since re-formed with a new singer in 2010). Formed in 2001, Badfish has become one of the biggest club and theater acts in the Northeast and Midwest. Badfish is Pat Downes (guitar, vocals), Joel Hanks (bass), Scott Begin (drums) and Dorian Duffy (keys, guitar).
For more information, visit badfish.com. — tg

 

Just Kidding
Proving it’s still possible to piss people off, if not exactly shock them, in the 21st century, Real Time’s Bill Maher stakes his claim to fame with the tagline “Equal Opportunity Offender.” Best known today as a talk show host after seven years on HBO and more than a decade before that on Comedy Central as the host of Politically Incorrect, Maher has authored five books including the recent The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody but Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass. The comedian got his start in stand-up back in 1979 and in addition to the nine stand-up specials he’s filmed over the years, he continues to sling jokes in front of a live theater audience at least 50 times a year. He’ll perform in “An Evening with Bill Maher” at the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts in Wilkes-Barre on Sunday, July 27 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $51 to $101. Call the box office at (570) 826-1100 or visit kirbycenter.org for more information. — ag

 

Pre-Code Party
Commonly known as the Hays Code for the influence of Hollywood censor Will H. Hays, The Motion Picture Production Code of 1930 was adopted after the transition from silent to talking films in acknowledgement of the power pictures had to influence the moral fabric of society. It would take some four years before the code was enforced however and producers took liberties in those few years, shooting sexually titillating scenes and showing sympathy for moral ambiguity. Women, in particular, enjoyed considerably more liberated roles before the Hays/Breen Office cracked down in 1934. The Albright Memorial Library in Scranton kicks off a Ladies of Pre-Code Film Festival on Wednesday, July 30 at 6 p.m. with the 1933 black and white classic Baby Face, starring Barbara Stanwyck as the prostituted daughter of a sleazy speakeasy owner in Erie who escapes to New York City where she sleeps and schemes her way to a posh penthouse and finally, redemption. Films continue weekly through Aug. 27 in the community room in the basement of the Children’s Library. See our calendar of events for additional titles or call (570) 348-3000 x3008 for more information. — ag

 

Smells like family fun
Adapted by John Glore from the book by Jon Scieska and Lane Smith, The Stinky Cheese Man & Other Fairly Stupid Tales opened last weekend at the Alvina Krause Theatre in Bloomsburg under the direction of Richie Cannaday. Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble’s annual Summer Family Show, the musical comedy is set in the Land of Fairy Tales inhabited by familiar characters from princesses, witches and giants to fabled animals and other satirical figures. Appropriate for all ages, the show runs through Sunday July 27 at 3 p.m. with additional performances Thursday at 1 and 7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Tickets are $14 or only $8 for children ages 12 and younger. Call (570) 784-8181 or visit bte.org for more information. — ag
Pictured: Ensemble member Daniel Roth as the Giant and guest actor Eric Wunsch as Jack.

Concerts in Scranton / Wilkes-Barre

Concerts in Scranton / Wilkes-Barre

Concerts in the 570 and beyond

F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre
Tickets: (570) 826-1100
Bill Maher, July 27
Robert Hunter, July 30
The Irish Rovers, Aug. 24
Willie Nelson and Family, Sept. 11
The truTV Impractical Jokers Tour, featuring The Tenderloins, Sept. 20

Gypsies Lounge & Night Club,
Mount Airy Casino Resort
Tickets: (877) 682-4791
Badfish: A Tribute to Sublime, July 26
Rockstar Energy Uproar Festival,
Aug. 23
Lisa Lampanelli, Sept. 13

Mauch Chunk Opera House,
Jim Thorpe
Tickets: (570) 325-0249
40 Story Radio Tower, featuring Amrev 2, July 24
Upright Citizens Brigade, July 25
McLovins and Mipso, July 26
Incendio, Aug. 1
Eddie Bruce, Aug. 2
PA Burlesque Festival, Aug.8-9
Kishi Bashi Band, Aug. 16
Atlas Gray, Aug. 22
The Grascals, Aug. 23
40 Story Radio Tower, featuring Girls, Guns and Glory, Aug. 28
Doc Gibbs and Friends, featuring DeeDee Lavell, Aug. 28
Simone Felice Trio, Aug. 30

Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, Wilkes-Barre
Tickets: (800) 745-3000
Smackdown TV, Sept. 9

Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs,
Plains Twp.
Tickets: (570) 823-9407
Party on the Patio: Satisfaction, July 24
John Waite, July 25
America, July 26
Party on the Patio: Draw the Line,
July 31
Dave Mason’s Traffic Jam, Aug. 2
Party on the Patio: Pyromania, Aug. 7
Party on the Patio: Almost Queen,
Aug. 14
Party on the Patio: Stayin’ Alive, Aug. 21
Soul Asylum, Aug. 23
Party on the Patio: Beatlemania Now, Aug. 28
Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Sept. 19
Asia, Sept. 28
38 Special, Oct. 4
Uncle Kracker, Oct. 11
Great White and Slaughter, Oct. 17
Queensryche, Oct. 31

Penn’s Peak, Jim Thorpe
Tickets: (570) 325-0371
3 Doors Down, July 24
Ziggy Marley, July 31
Great White and Vixen, Aug. 15
The Zombies, Aug. 17
Yonder Mountain String Band, Aug. 21
James Supra Band, Aug. 24
Jake Kaligis/New Constitution, Aug. 28
Winger and FireHouse, Sept. 5
Anna Popovic, Sept. 13

River Street Jazz Cafe, Plains
Tickets: (570) 822-2992
The Primate Fiasco, July 24
Omnitial, July 25
Mother Nature’s Sons, July 26
Zach Deputy, July 31
Clarence Spady Band, Aug. 1
Suze, with Dustin Drevitch and the Electric Gentleman, Aug. 2
Tauk, Aug. 7
Strawberry Jam, Aug. 15
Tribute to Prince, Aug. 16
The Weight, Aug. 22
Pink Talking Fish, Aug. 23
The Z3 with Ed Mann of the Original Zappa Band, Aug. 29
Trespass, Aug. 30
Twiddle, Sept. 12

Scranton Cultural Center
Tickets: (800) 745-3000
Rob Stoneback Big Band, July 26

Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg
Tickets: (570) 420-2808
Life on the Sideline, July 24
Good News, July 25
Gent Treadly with Kenny Brooks, July 25
Charles Neville and Gent Treadly, July 25
Over the Years Sherman Independent Rock Series, July 27
On Your Marks, July 31
Culture Clash, Aug. 1
Cole Swindell, Aug. 2
Marigold, Aug. 7
King Bison, Aug. 8
Club 524, Aug. 9
P.O.W.W.O.W., Aug. 9
The Quest for Honey Mustard Tour,
Aug. 14
Sherlock, Aug. 15
No Reason, Aug. 16
Doktra, Aug. 18
Blessthefall and Chiodos, Aug. 23
All Them Witches, Aug. 23
Lights Divide, Aug. 26
Transfer Switch, Aug. 30
Ike Avelli, Sept. 13
Keller Williams, Sept. 20

Pavilion at Montage Mountain, Scranton
Tickets: (570) 961-9000
Under the Influence of Music Tour, featuring Wiz Khalifa, Tyga & More, July 24
Mayhem Festival, Aug. 2
KISS and Def Leppard, Aug. 9
Peach Music Festival, Aug. 14 – 17
Josh Groban, Aug. 26
Monumentour: Fall Out Boy and Paramore, Aug. 31
Electric Factory, Philadelphia
Tickets: (215) 627-1332
This Is Hardcore, July 24-27
Christina Perri, July 25
The Offspring, Aug. 2
Passenger, Aug. 8
The Moody Blues, Aug. 11
The Hooters, Aug. 30
Die Antwoord, Sept. 5
King Crimson, Sept. 12-13
Lily Allen, Sept. 19
Bro Safari, Sept. 20
City Bisco, Sept. 26
Broken Bells, Sept. 27

Keswick Theatre, Glenside, Pa.
Tickets: (215) 572-7650
Stayin’ Alive, July 24
Winery Dogs, July 30
Jeffrey Osborne, Aug. 1
Rock ‘n’ Blues Fest, Aug. 5
Retro Futura Tour, Aug. 22
Beres Hammond, Aug. 24
Toto, Sept. 4
Sig Hansen and Friends, Sept. 11
Chris Isaak, Sept. 12
British Invasion, Sept. 13
Pink Martini, Sept. 19
Kashmir, Sept. 20
Last Comic Standing, Oct. 3
Tim and Eric and Dr. Steve Brule, Oct. 10

Musikfest, Downtown Bethlehem
Tickets: 610-332-1300
ZZ Top, Aug. 1
The All-American Rejects, Aug. 2
Jason Derulo, Aug. 3
Sheryl Crow, Aug. 4
The Moody Blues, Aug. 5
Steely Dan, Aug. 6
The Avett Brothers, Aug. 7
Alan Jackson, Aug. 8
Weezer, Aug. 9
Keith Urban, Aug. 10

Sands Bethlehem Event Center
Tickets: (800) 745-3000
George Lopez, July 25
The Fray, July 31
Yanni, Aug. 12
The Cult, Aug. 14
Howie Mandel, Aug. 23
Chevelle with Dayshell and KYNG,
Aug. 31
British Invasion Tour, Sept. 10
Sig Hansen and Friends, Sept. 12
Gladys Knight, Sept. 14
Sellersville Theater, Sellersville
Tickets: (215) 257-5808
Skid Row with Kill Devil Hill, July 22
Trampled Under Foot, July 23
Days of the New, July 24
Dick Dale, July 27
Leon Russell, July 29
Nellie McKay, Aug. 3
Old 97s, Aug. 8
Barleyjuice, Aug. 16
Parrotbeach, Aug. 22
Herman’s Hermits, starring Peter Noone, Sept. 7
John Oates, Sept. 25
Joan Osborne, Sept. 27
10,000 Maniacs, Oct. 5
Jars of Clay, Oct. 11
Paula Cole, Oct. 18

Susquehanna Bank Center,
Camden, N.J.
Tickets: (856) 365-1300
Under the Influence of Music Tour: Wiz Khalifa, Tyga and More, July 25
Ryan Adams, Jenny Lewis and Dawes, July 26
Beck, Band of Horses and The Districts, July 27
Nine Inch Nails and Soundgarden,
July 30
Mayhem Festival, Aug. 1
KISS and Def Leppard, Aug. 3
Linkin Park, Aug. 15
Funny or Die and Preston & Steve Present Oddball Comedy Festival 2014, Aug. 16
Goo Goo Dolls, Daughtry and Plain White Ts, Aug. 17
Jimmy Buffett, Aug. 19
Drake vs. Lil Wayne, Aug. 21
Motley Crue, Aug. 23
Uproar Festival, Aug. 26
Miranda Lambert with Justin Moore and Thomas Rhett, Sept. 5
Toby Keith with Colt Ford, Sept. 27

Tower Theater, Philadelphia
Tickets: (610) 352-2887
The Wayans Brothers, Aug. 2
David Gray, Aug. 5
Umphrey’s McGee, Aug. 9
Chevelle, Middle Class Rut and Dayshell, Aug. 29
Savoy, Sept. 12
Coheed and Cambria and Thank You Scientist, Sept. 24
Twenty One Pilots, Sept. 27-28

Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia
Tickets: (800) 298-4200
Miley Cyrus, Aug. 2
Katy Perry, August 4-5
Jesus Christ Superstar, Aug. 16
Ed Sheeran, Sept. 8
Cirque du Soleil, Sept. 10-14
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers,
Sept. 15
The Black Keys, Sept. 20
Aziz Ansari, Sept. 26
Fleetwood Mac, Oct. 15, Oct. 29

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel N.Y.
Tickets: 1 (866) 781-2922
Kenny Rogers, July 26
Toby Keith, July 27
The Temptations and The Four Tops, Aug. 1
Lionel Richie and CeeLo Green, Aug. 2
John Fogerty, Aug. 8
Kings of Leon, Aug. 16
Keith Urban, Aug. 17
Goo Goo Dolls with Daughtry, Aug. 19
Josh Groban, Aug. 23
Zac Brown Band, Aug.29
Miranda Lambert, Aug. 31

Madison Square Garden,
New York, N.Y.
Tickets: (212) 307-7171
Blake Shelton, Aug. 1
La Salsa Vive, Aug. 29
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers,
Sept. 10
Luke Bryan, Sept. 12
History of the Eagles, Sept. 13
Cher, Sept. 19-20
Enrique Iglesias and Pitbull, Sept. 25
Eric Prydz, Sept. 27
Bassnectar, Oct. 4
Fleetwood Mac, Oct. 6-7

Beacon Theatre, New York, N.Y.
Tickets: (212) 465-6500
Tori Amos, Aug. 12-13
Lyle Lovett, Aug. 23
Gipsy Kings, Sept. 6
Natalie Merchant, Sept. 13
Pink Martini, Sept. 18
Tedeschi Trucks Band, Sept. 19-27
Bunbury, Sept. 21
Bryan Ferry, Oct. 1
Afghan Whigs, Oct. 4

Bryce Jordan Center, University Park
Tickets: (814) 865-5555
Foster the People, Sept. 5

World Cafe Live (downstairs),
Philadelphia
Tickets: (215) 222-1400
The Movement, July 24
Soulidified Presents LVRGRL: Paying Homage to Teena Marie, July 25
The Baseball Project, July 28
School of Rock All-Stars, July 29
Cultura Profetica, July 30
Marc Cohn, July 31
Celebrating Jerry Garcia, Aug. 1
Mike Peters of The Alarm, Aug. 6
Donavon Frankenreiter, Aug. 8
Philly Bloco, Aug. 9
Animus: Philadelphia’s Belly Dance Spectacular, Aug. 10
Agnes Obel, Aug. 12
Marty Stewart and His Fabulous Superlatives, Aug. 13
Paradise Fears, Aug. 15
The Wayside Shakeup, Primatives, Save Station, Lost Haven, Knightlife, Aug. 16
Eric Roberson, Aug. 17
Will Hoge, Aug. 20
Red Wanting Blue, Aug. 22
Made in Philly, Aug. 28
Sun Cinema, Red Letter Life, Moonshine Social, Confused Disciples, Aug. 29
Breakwater, Aug. 30
The Young Dubliners, Sept. 4
Snarky Puppy, Sept. 12

Arts on the Square

Arts on the Square

This Saturday, July 26, Scranton will again be home to Arts on the Square, Scranton’s largest arts festival, according to its organizers and the city’s Best New Event of 2013, according to Electric City readers.
Arts on the Square organizers Cristin Powers and Chrissy Manuel, both of ScrantonMade, said they are pleased to see their celebration in its sophomore year.
“The county approached us,” said Manuel. “The arts and culture department, as well as the commissioners, were looking to do something really supportive of our art community and they saw our partnership with the Scranton Cultural Center the holiday beforehand, so they asked if we would like to partner with them in throwing an event on the square.”
Crafters, painters, photographers, musicians and more than 110 vendors will line Courthouse Square. The event will be kid-friendly with an activities tent and Spirited Art instructors’ art classes. There will also be adult and teen art classes, yoga classes in the lawn, a slow-motion video booth, live painting and other entertainment.
“People can literally spend the day there,” said Manuel. “There will be food trucks, ice cream and places to hang out and sit on the lawn. Last year, we saw a lot of people who brought blankets and just hung out on the lawn, which is really cool to see around here, because you don’t really see that often. You see that more in a bigger park or a bigger city.”
A first this year is yarn bombing, which will be one of the installation pieces for Saturday’s event. A yarn bomb, or yarn storm, is a form of removable graffiti that uses knitted or crocheted pieces in place of chalk or paint. Annie Cadden of Fisher Cat Fiber Co. said the yarn bombing is already a success. “The people who wanted to get involved are all so positive and they are all people who don’t even know each other. They will all meet on Friday,” she said.
printcolorYarn bombing is typically a solo project and something done on a creative whim. This piece is planned, but Cadden said she looks forward to seeing what is created with so many influences and artists’ visions.
Ryan Hnat is a painter who was part of the open-air gallery at last year’s Arts on the Square. This year will be the first year that he and his wife, a photographer, will have their own booth, Hnat Designs.
“We’re actually still working on putting our booth together, because this is our first actual festival,” said Hnat. “A lot of vendors travel to several festivals a year, but we haven’t done it yet. This is an exciting time. I really like supporting the growth of art in Scranton and that’s one reason why we got involved.”
Many of the vendors appreciate the focus on local. Billie Jean Williams, owner of Designs by Billie Jean, said she was one of last year’s featured artists for Arts on the Square, but is a regular vendor at many regional festivals and craft fairs. When asked to compare Arts on the Square to other festivals, she said that the city’s affair is “more concentrated on the local crafters of Scranton and the surrounding areas.”
Some of the vendors will show and sell their wares, but others will create right on the spot. There will be live painting by Evan Hughes and Benjamin Adcroft throughout the day and the pieces will be auctioned off.
“I’m honestly not even sure what I’m going to do yet,” said Adcroft. “It’s going to be spur-of-the-moment and spontaneous. I’m probably going to think of it the day or two before.”
Adcroft said sometimes having an audience can be a bit strange, but he is looking forward to painting outdoors and feeding off the other painter’s energy. “I like working big. I like working fast. Trying to finish a piece in one day is going to be fun,” said Adcroft.
Another element of art is music. Arts on the Square will have two stages this year: One on Spruce Street, hosted by Summersteps Records and another on Linden Street, hosted by Highway 81 Revisited.
Summersteps Records is a record label started by Eric Schlittler in 1996 when he began releasing demos for his then-solo-act, Kid Icarus.
“I started doing demos with Kid Icarus and at the same time my wife and I were dating and we were going to a lot of shows in New York City, so when we would go to a show, we would run off a bunch of demo tapes and eventually the idea started, ‘Well, why don’t we put these tapes out on a label?’” said Schlittler.
The Summersteps Stage will feature artists from the record label and bands that Schlittler said fit the vibe of the indie rock guitar stage, such as Kid Icarus, now a full band, Cold Coffee, Eww Yaboo and A Fire with Friends.
Schlittler said he is looking forward to reaching an audience that he may not normally have access to.
“I think it’s kind of a good opportunity to get your music out in front of people that maybe don’t necessarily go to a bar at night and are a little more art-inclined, so I’m kind of looking forward to getting our music out there and present it to maybe some different people,” said Schlittler.
Michael Lello of Highway 81 Revisited, a Scranton-based music blog, agreed.
“Just as a function of covering music and being involved with the ‘local music scene,’ many of the events we’ve been a part of have been at bars, which is fine, but it limits your audience,” said Lello.
The Highway 81 Revisited Stage will showcase five bands: Indigo Moon Brass Band, Heavy Blonde, Katie Kelly & The Charming Beards, Gentleman East and Charles Havira.
“I wanted some musical diversity on stage and artists that are either relatively new or doing things that are interesting or a little different,” Lello said.
With something for each of your five senses, this year hopes for more success than the last. Hnat thinks that the growth in the arts will even affect the financial situation of the city.
“In the last year, there’s a lot more people starting to put more time into doing more events and more artistic endeavors outside First Friday in Scranton,” said the painter. “The city and the artists and the local community can really continue to push the events, the growth of arts in the city can really flourish and if it does, it’ll start to even show an impact on the city and the city will start to flourish again.”
— kimberly m. aquilina

 

Participating
Vendors

1120 Studios  •  2 Cranes Plants  •  A=Mc2  •  A Daily Obsession  •  Air Affair Body Art  •  Alchemy Home Company  •  All Hands On  •  Aquilina Oddities  •  Ashley Kujat
bachestinks  •  Bellaluna Eterna  •  Benjamin Adcroft  •  Boutique Libertina  •  Burke’s Maple  •  C & P Designs  •  Campfire Music Festival  •  Canned Classics  •  Casey Heyen  •  Charlee’s Treasures  •  Charles Arts  •  Cheryl’s Creations  •  Cindy’s Jewelry Creations  •  Clay Chickadee  •  Coal Country Photography  •  Cork and Crafts Creative  •  Crafty Gifts (and Beer Bites)  •  Crow Designs Studio  •  D. Potts  •  Dale B Craft  •  Danielle’s Designs  •  Dave’s Art Den  •  Designs by Billie Jean  •  Designs from a Burchards Crossing  •  Ditch’s Delites  •  Draw the Pig  •  Earth and Wears  •  Eco-Chic  •  Edward Murphy Books  •  Elegantly Eclectic LLC  •  Erie Lackawanna Dining Car Preservation Society  • European Treasures  •  Everhart Museum  • Fisher Cat Fiber Co  •  Fly Me Home Decor  •  Folk Couture  •  FUNKY FINERY  •  Goldsack Art  •  Gypsy Jane Pop Up Vintage Shop  •  Handmade by Eliana  •  Heart for Art  •  Hexagon Project  •  Highway 81 Revisited  •  Hnat Designs  •  Igor’s Russian Art Gallery  •  Invoke Studio & Delectable Dreams  •  Jenn Bell  •  Jewelry By LaPierre  •  JMaz Jewelry  •  John Ingiaimo  •  JVW Inc.  •  Lackawanna County Library System  •  Lake Pots  •  Laurabee Studios  •  Light Curves  •  Liquid Heart Studio  •  Little Hands Big Art  •  Magaret DeBruin Designs  •  Margaux’s Monograms  •  Maria Grzybowski  •  Mercato  •  Miss Debbie’s Soaps  •  Mock Pie Studio  •  Mountain Sky  •  New Kirk Honey  •  Patricia Annabelli  •  Pop Up Studio  •  Reba Handmade  •  Reclaimed  •  a candle company  •  Reclamation Industrial Furnishings  •  Ruth Kkoelewyn  •  S.E.S Styles  •  Scenes from the Attic  •  Scranton Civic Ballet  •  Scranton Cultural Center  •  Second Time Around  •  Shanty Town Design  •  Sonny Jones  •  Woodturner  •  Spirited Art  •  Scranton  •  Spoon Sisters  •  Summersteps Records  •  Sundae Matinee  •  Symmetry  •  Tammy’s Stained Glass Treasures  •  The Bag Lady  •  The Baklava lady  •  The Dearly Departed Players  •  The Hunter Collection  •  The Pennsylvania Film School  •  Tiny Galazies  •  Transformative Art  •  Valerie Kiser  •  Verve Vertu Arts  •  Voyager Video  •  Well Dressed Cook  •  Woodland Way and more…

Gasoline

Gasoline

Owner: Ron Moore
Make: Crosley Station Wagon
Model: CC


Year: 1948
Color: Yellow
Specs: 26 hp motor, 44 cc, 12-inch chrome tires
Weight: 1190 lbs

Sharks!

Sharks!

Summer of the Shark
Sharks!  land in the 570

 

Ever since Jaws first swam its way into the public consciousness, people the world over have been both fascinated and frightened by the very concept of sharks. Every time someone is attacked by a shark, it becomes instant national news, despite the fact that, according to Everhart Museum curator Nezka Pfeifer, “You have a greater chance of being hit by a falling coconut and dying than being attacked and killed by a shark.” As human beings, we generally fear what we do not understand and Sharks!, a new exhibit at the Everhart Museum, Scranton, seeks to dispel that fear by educating the public on the importance of these magnificent creatures in the oceanic food chain in a fun and exciting way.
Sharks! is the brainchild of acclaimed shark scientist Alessandro De Maddalena, who spends most of his time photographing and researching sharks in the Simon’s Town, South Africa area. After amassing a large collection of great white shark photographs, he contacted the museum to see if they were interested in exhibiting his photos. Given the relative popularity of sharks in popular culture (Jaws, Shark Week, Sharknado), the museum decided not only to exhibit his photographs, but also to branch out and showcase as many facets of the subject matter as possible. The Everhart brought out a handful of items it had in its collection and worked with the Burke Museum at the University of Washington in Seattle in order to feature a few cultural artifacts from the university’s ethnographic collection that use shark skin and shark teeth. After contacting a few other artists who feature sharks in their work, the museum reached out to the University of Scranton in order to procure a dissection of one of the dogfish sharks the university uses for its comparative biology classes. Finally, the museum reached out to the community to showcase the work of our younger artists in a companion exhibit entitled Shiver of Sharks, which offers an imaginative glance into the things sharks do when people aren’t looking.
While the photography focuses on great white sharks, the exhibit tries to show how important all of the 500 or so species of shark are in their role as top predators of the ocean’s ecosystems, which rely on sharks to police the fish and mammalian population. Strangely enough, more than 100 species of shark are currently critically endangered. Due to the frightening nature of their predatory role, the plight of the endangered shark doesn’t get a lot of press — after all, it’s hard to imagine anything being able to harm an apex predator and, if the movies have taught us anything, they have taught us that sharks are notoriously bloodthirsty and hard to kill. The truth, of course, is that only about 75 shark attacks occur yearly worldwide and that many sharks are critically endangered due to the prevalence of shark fin soup in Asia — its preparation involves cutting off the still-living shark’s fin and then releasing it back into the ocean to die wounded and helpless, and the phenomenon known as “bycatch,” which is when a marine species is unintentionally caught while fishermen hunt a target species. (The most famous case of this would be how dolphins are often caught in tuna nets.) While sharks are often vilified and demonized in popular culture (Sharknado 2 is set to premiere on July 31), the truth is that sharks perform a much-needed service to the world’s oceans, preventing the oceans from being overrun by their prey. Even Peter Benchley, the author of Jaws and the co-writer of its film adaptation, became an ocean advocate and spent the years since the film’s debut working with ocean conservationists to explain how important sharks are to world’s ecosystems. While the exhibit plays upon the interest generated by Jaws and the like, it seeks to dispel some of the common misconceptions created in film and television over the last few decades.
Since the exhibit’s debut on July 5, the biggest fans of the exhibit have been children. Perhaps because they haven’t yet been exposed to Jaws and its offspring, children are fascinated by sharks and seem to lack the fear many of their adult counterparts have for the creatures. Their fascination with all things shark is showcased in Shiver of Sharks, which features the work of local art teachers and students from the region. Shiver of Sharks asked its artists the question, “What do sharks do when humans aren’t around,” and the results are creative, humorous, and engaging. The exhibit offers a local, imaginative take on the lives of these majestic creatures, and it offers a nice bit of fun for the whole family.
All in all, Sharks! is an immersive, informative exhibit that is definitely worth your time; it will challenge your preconceptions and may even cause you to rethink that intense fear you feel every time you get into the water.
— tom salitsky

 

PHOTOS of the exhibit BY TOM BONOMO
Sharks! and Shiver of Sharks are on exhibit now through Sept. 8 at the Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. Adult admission is $7, student and senior admission is $5, admission for children between six and 12 is $3 and admission for children under five and for Everhart members is free.
For more information on the work of Alessandro De Maddalena, visit alessandrodemaddalena.com/uk/. For more information on the Everhart Museum, visit everhart-museum.org or call (570) 346-7186.

 

Looking Back: Jaws

Looking Back: Jaws

Here’s to STILL Swimming with Bow-Legged Women
A Critic Looks back at Jaws

 

Talk about sharks. If you ever want to feel even more cynical about the flimflam, snakeoil-peddling, business side of H’Wood, read Peter Biskind’s expertly written, venom-tongued, warts-n-all tell-all Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-And Rock ‘N Roll Generation Saved Hollywood, which chronicles what’s possibly the most fertile decade — creatively and financially — for the Big 7 film studios (take it from me, a guy who turned down a mail room job at New Line Cinema because spending any time in their Beverly Hills offices made The Day of the Locusts look like a plucky Disney princess story). The subject of the book, 70s films and filmmakers, is my favorite period in filmmaking history, a stretch that just happened to birth the modern blockbuster with a certain 1975 classic called Jaws, pretty much a horror movie featuring a great white shark as the monster. Biskind’s book chronicles the epic production of this film in great acerbic detail. Here, I’ll provide some bullet points along with my recollections of a recent screening, which left me with the opinion that film’s first bona fide summer popcorn blockbuster still possesses as thrilling and entertaining a bite as it did nearly 40 years ago.
• Based on Peter Benchley’s 1974 novel of the same name, the property was already a massive hit before it hit the screen. According to The New York Times, the book spent 40 weeks on their bestseller list and went on to sell 20 million copies. It was only a matter of time before H’Wood came knocking. In this case, the rights got snagged in 1973 by Richard D. Zanuck and David Brown before the book was even published. Though he would never again see the success of his debut novel, the author would go on to get several other titles published, pretty much all of them nautically-themed — The Deep (about sunken treasure), The Island (about pirates), The Beast (about a giant squid) and White Shark (about … well, you know). Even when he wasn’t turning out books, Benchley wrote articles on oceanographic and sea life conservation up to his death in 2006. My friend Dan recollected meeting the author during a research outing for one of these pieces. While in the Navy, Dan was working on a nuclear submarine that played host to Benchley one day while it was docked in Groton, Connecticut. The author sat next to my friend in the galley and asked what he did. Electrical engineering, it turned out. When Benchley remarked that he wrote Jaws, Dan simply looked unimpressed. After all, considering the context of handling the complex wiring that powered America’s deadliest line of defense, writing beach reading just didn’t come close in terms of important jobs. Dan stood up, cleared his breakfast tray and got back to work while Benchley just sat there. But I digress.
• Meanwhile, back in 1974, production on Jaws commenced. Numerous screenwriters and drafts came and went before a serviceable script surfaced. The captain of this ship, director Steven Spielberg, smartly wanted most of Benchley’s meandering subplots deep sixed in order to focus solely on, well, Jaws himself. Streamlined, the existing story played out like this: A police chief (Roy Scheider), marine biologist (Richard Dreyfuss) and seasoned fisherman (Robert Shaw) set out to stop a gigantic great white that’s threatening the island town of Amity during its busiest tourist season — short, sweet, shark.
•  Principal photography began in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts in May … only the shark didn’t work. That is, the mechanical rubber shark built by Universal Studio technicians kept breaking down. My friend Aaron Fiore played a young George Lucas in an award-winning short comedy called Courage & Stupidity, which presented the plight of then-unproven director Spielberg (played by Todd Wall) to overcome the problem of making a shark film with no shark just as the studio bosses were moving in to shut down production and fire the director. Writer/director Darin Beckstead may’ve fictionalized much of the goings on, but the general behind-the-scenes story remains true by all accounts, firing and all. No one thought that Jaws would be a hit, its crew included. On set, crew members even nicknamed the production Flaws.
•  Regardless of the legendary technical problems that plagued the production, however, the production also boasted a soon-to-be legendary talent who still would’ve been on a superstar trajectory whether the mechanical shark worked or not. Indeed, the path to Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., The Color Purple, Jurassic Park, Schindler’s List, Saving Private Ryan and Lincoln may’ve been different without Jaws, but I’d like to argue that this director was always bound for greatness. Spielberg cut his teeth on television (Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Marcus Welby, M.D.) and already had a few flicks under his belt (Duel, Sugarland Express), but consider that his landmark filmmaking touchstones were already in full effect in Jaws: framing ordinary people in extraordinary situations; maintaining humanity and morals while facing inhuman terror; finding humor even in the most horrific of moments; zoom-in close ups of his star’s awe-struck faces. It’s all there, along with soon-to-be frequent collaborators John Williams (giving us an unforgettable — admit it, it’s playing in your head right now — score) and Richard Dreyfuss (giving us a quirky career-making performance). Roy Scheider, who Spielberg admired in another 70s classic called The French Connection, brings an authentic feel to the lead character, “Police Chief Brody,” which grounds the drama all the more. Luckily, the script developed the players beyond caricatures. Perhaps, no character evinces this more than Robert Shaw’s “Quint,” who turns from a salty son of a sea cook into a tortured survivor with one speech that gets burned into your mind forever from the first time you hear it. More on that later, however.
And yes, the rubber mechanical shark looked a bit dodgy. It looked dodgy back then as well, however, which is why Spielberg hid it away until nearly the end of the film … well, that and the fact that it luckily kept breaking, that is. Regardless of any early setbacks, all aspects of his production — from letter perfect performances to expertly written dialogue to a powerful score to masterful direction — amounts to a ridiculously exhilarating scaremaker of the highest order — then, now and for years to come. Granted, Jaws didn’t invent the genre. In fact, the film employs a Hitchcockian style of suspense in building up to a slowburn reveal of the actual shark. At its heart, the film remains a first-rate monster movie that often baits its audience from the creature’s underwater point of view in the tradition of Universal horror classic, The Creature from the Black Lagoon. Indeed, Spieldberg knew his film history which is a major reason why he became a part of film history.
•  Jaws went on to become the highest-grossing film in history until Star Wars stormed the box office in 1977. It also bagged Academy Awards for film editing, best score and sound. Perhaps its greatest accomplishment remains the fact that it is regarded by many as one of the greatest films of all time, this critic included. The fact that this well weathered all-time classic remains the “Quint-essential” shark film despite many imitators, however, stands testament to the fact that Jaws holds up beautifully in an age of photo-realistic computer effects.
•  When talk came of Jaws 2, Spielberg initially wanted nothing to do with the inevitable sequel. At one point during pre-production of the film, however, he reportedly entertained one possibility. What if they made it a prequel based solely on Quint’s searing USS Indianapolis speech, a chilling first-hand account of hundreds of sailors getting picked off by sharks in icy waters following their vessel getting torpedoed that was written by writer/director John Milius (Conan the Barbarian, Red Dawn)? The sharks at Universal, of course, said “no.” Perhaps, this muted prequel idea remains one of H’Wood’s greatest unfulfilled coulda-beens. Without this follow-up, we’ll just have to make do with the scary near perfection of Jaws. Lucky us.

Up Close: Ryan Cooper

Up Close: Ryan Cooper

Up Close & Personal

Always Sailing Ahead

Ryan Cooper reiterates the unpredictable nature of uncovering up-and-coming and innovative lure for Cooper’s Seafood. He and his family have striven for three generations to magnetize crowds into their restaurant’s seats. Over the years, they have cultivated their franchise both at their original location in Scranton and their second location in Pittston. Outside expansion consisted of various unique, creative venues, such as their lighthouse bar, pirate ship, dock and cabana. Inside, a wealth of community, family and cultural history continuously splashes across every wall, enlivening customer experience while dining. Cooper’s caters both on its location and off, assisting in weddings, family celebrations, corporate breakfasts or lunches and even private parties. Meet Ryan Cooper …

What was life like before Coopers?
For me, there was no life before Cooper’s. I’ve worked here since I was around 13 years old and throughout my years at school. I went to St. Ann’s before attending Riverside High School and, later, the University of Scranton. I never veered from desiring to be a part of the family business in some way or another. I stayed in Scranton my whole life to be around it. I think it was bred in me. Even when I went to college I majored in restaurant management, because that’s what I knew I wanted to do. I just love it! I’m delighted to be working with such great people where my work is always enjoyable.

Tell us what it’s like having the restaurant as a family business.
It’s 99.9 percent awesome. It really is. Growing up, it was frustrating at times when I had plans and craved to go out on the weekends and something would come up at the restaurant, and my dad would tell me I wasn’t going out despite my plans. For instance, if the dishwasher called off, then I wasn’t going anywhere until the dishes were done. When it came down to it, it was instilled in me that the family restaurant needed to be taken care of first. With the exception of some family in New York, everyone in my family is pretty much here. It’s nice to be so close-knit. We’re all involved in one way or another with the business.

What gave your family the idea to start up Cooper’s Seafood?
My grandpa started Cooper’s in 1948 after World War II. His brother, Frank, invented a machine to make braided rugs back in the 40s. Frank had a rug mill that made him a multi-millionaire. He used the extra money he had to invest to buy this building and open Cooper’s Seafood. Yet, Frank didn’t want to run it. So, he asked my grandpa to do so, while my grandfather was still working for him. In the 70s, my dad and his brothers came into the picture and bought the business from my grandpa. It’s been a continuous family enterprise since the very beginning.

Talk about your role and typical workday with the business.
When I was younger, my day at the restaurant could be filled with washing dishes or hanging up coats when we used to have a coat check. Right now, my day starts at about 7 a.m. On a normal day, I can spend about 12 hours here. I do everything from checking the beer, making lists for the beer, making sure the beer is tapped and trapped, assuring that the bar tenders know what beer is coming in, buying beer, taking beer inventory and changing menus and bottle menus. Then I take care of any Internet and computer-related business, which falls under my reign. I will handle emails, answering customer questions or other email correspondence. After this, I log into Facebook to respond to any other questions presented to the company. Then I will come down to fix anything that breaks or find somebody that can when I can’t. Truthfully, we all do everything. I don’t have one specific job. One day the bookkeeper’s computer might crash and need fixing and the next day there might be a light bulb out in the gift shop that requires changing. When we get new equipment, such as TVs and the like, I’ll set them up. When it comes to live entertainment, I am in charge of booking bands. Further, I customized an app, proprietary to all of our beers, which allows customers to search through our 500 bottles of beer for the drink they are looking for or something similar to it as well. Essentially, it’s Amazon for beer!

What motivated your family to establish the restaurant in both Scranton and Pittston?
We started out by opening here in Scranton first because we are from here, and we still live in the area. Pittston came about after Scranton. It’s been maybe 20 years that we have been there and we owe a huge amount of our success to being successful in Scranton. Back when the economy was booming, there were three-hour waits just to get dinner at our Scranton location. So, due to this achievement and many calls we received about setting up in other areas, we added on to the business. And we still get these calls about three to four times a month with opportunities to open other restaurants in brand-new locations — from Florida to Hawaii. We have customers even inquire about starting up in other areas nearer to them. But Pittston was a good fix, since it was still close enough that our family could manage and run it ourselves. We can drive down there about three times a week to take care of the same things that we do here.

Tell us what customers will experience at Cooper’s, including the various, popular seafood dishes that they can choose from.
Customers can expect freshness when it comes to our food. We don’t buy anything that is processed and nothing goes to waste. We actually donate all of our food scraps to a local pig farmer who tells us his pigs eat the best food in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Our main staples are shrimp and our crab dip. Right now, our biggest seller is our crabby pretzel, which is pretzel covered in crabmeat and cheese sauce, then baked. It’s huge on our deck. Also, we do different specials every day. We have $2.99 clams on Sunday and Monday all day and we sell thousands and thousands of orders in just a couple of days. As far as dinners go, lobsters are probably the biggest. Everyone wants lobster, shrimp and crab. It’s hard for me to say exactly what the most popular dish is myself, because I eat something new here every day and absolutely love it. As far as other experiences not concerning food, customers can enjoy the live entertainment we request to come in on weekends and the bike nights we hold on Tuesdays in Pittston.

What’s your secret that keeps customers coming in?
Well, our crab bisque is our biggest seller that keeps customers coming in. But that’s not too much of a secret. Everyone knows about it. I like to think our customer service is our key ingredient that keeps customers coming back. We have had many servers here for more than 25 years. They have been with us forever. I remember some of them from when I was 10 years old and they are still here today working with us. Therefore, I truly believe the secret is the good people who are working here. When you have good people in a restaurant, then customers are going to enjoy a good experience. And it’s the same notion with our food. We buy good product, so we are putting out good product. We always strive to move forward. When you get stagnant, you’re done. We try to keep our customers from getting bored by coming up with the next big thing to continue to attract their interest.

Is there something specific about Cooper’s that you find most exhilarating?
I’m a beer guy, so I love the beer selection we have here. And I enjoy coming in every day to tap, trap, braid, check and taste it. I like to pair the beers with food and prepare it for various beer events. I believe it was 1977 when my dad decided he was going to do an international beer list. In the 70s, there were no craft beers, small breweries selling beer in the states, whereas now there are tons. So, we did international back in the day — 30 beers from Germany, 10 from Australia, five beers from Korea and 10 from Russia. We had about 150 bottles back then. And that was a ton at that time. No one else was doing this kind of stuff. It was new and exciting and we became known for it. Now, of course, times have changed with craft beers now available. People no longer desire the import beer. They want beer from the little breweries that are located in the United States. We aim to get special brewery beers that are very rare to get, even in Pennsylvania.

Cooper’s has had famous guests stop in. Could you tell us a few who have? And what it was like having them come here?
Sure. President Clinton and Hillary Clinton are probably two of the most well-known. It was surreal witnessing a week of surveillance, snipers on the roof, secret service, the kitchen food had to be served to a food tester first and every beer had to be drunk first before going to President Clinton. President Eisenhower was here in the 50s. Derek Jeter recently came in maybe four or five times when he was with the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders and he was very sociable. Alex Rodriguez (A-Rod) was here and he was awesome and very professional. Most of The Office cast was here, so we were able to meet them. They were all amazingly fun to be around. They even used footage that their film crew shot here as a scene in one of their episodes. So, that was very exciting for us. Brian O’Halloran, who plays “Dante” on Clerks, came in and he was very friendly. When I was younger some famous wrestlers stopped in — Hulk Hogan, Junkyard Dog and André the Giant. Having them come into the restaurant was loads of fun. They acted like they were putting on one of their shows. Really, it was delightful to see.
— katelyn english

 

Even more:

You cannot help but notice the creative uniqueness of your different venues. Share a little bit with us on how Cooper’s developed the lighthouse bar, pirate ship, cabana, etc.
For us it has always been about moving forward. It all started at our Scranton location when my grandpa began at the train station. He actually took the bar that was closing across the street, literally lifted it off the ground and walked it over to be a part of Cooper’s. It is the bar currently in the old room right now. We call it the old, original bar, which is the train station that contained just a bar and small kitchen. Then it went from the old bar, one room with a train encircling it, to having a dinning room with a 50-foot whale. After that we put the rail room on and then the ship came, the lighthouse bar and the dock later on. We added the deck to help with bigger crowds. When remodeling the bathrooms, themed after The Beatles and Elvis Presley, we decided to put a gift shop in where we now sell T-shirts and knick-knacks. The gift shop created an awkward box and that was when we had to ask ourselves what else would go with a ship — a lighthouse. Then the cabana, at our Pittston location, came from me. I thought it up, in large part, because I am a huge Jimmy Buffett fan and also because we knew we lost out on the deck here when it rains. Thus, we made the cabana an outdoor bar with a roof. The bar and chairs are made out of real bamboo. And it’s great. With all of our venues want customers to feel like they are on vacation at both location.

What direction do you see Cooper’s going in the near future with everything it has already accomplished thus far?
We have been blessed with success and we hope to do so by always finding the next thing. We will continue to do as much charity work as we can and we have worked with Make-A-Wish Foundation and similar organizations. We are working on party events and have the Boston Sam Adams Clam Bake coming up. We have been doing more weddings and stuff like that with our catering, which has really blossomed lately. But you never know. What is nice about a family business is that you get to make your own decisions. Perhaps one day we may look into another location, sell franchise and stuff, or add our own brewery somewhere where we can do our own micro brew. These are all possibilities and we will have to consider restrictions as well before making any final decisions.

Headphones

Headphones

Assorted declarations from editor Tom Graham

 

Give Us moe.!!!
moe. is stopping by the 570 once again to treat audiences to a summer night full of jamming and dancing. The band lights up the Sherman Summer Stage at Mount Airy Casino Resort on Friday, July 18, at 8 p.m. Tickets for the rain or shine event are $28.
From modest beginnings in a Buffalo basement over two decades ago to today’s multifaceted success, the members of moe. are still doing what they have always done — jam and entertain their devoted fans. moe.’s line-up of Rob Derhak (bass, vocals), Chuck Garvey (guitar, vocals) and Al Schnier (guitar, keyboards, vocals) have played together in the group for more than 20 years with the later additions of drummer Vinnie Amico and percussionist and multi-instrumentalist Jim Loughlin. moe. released its newest studio album, No Guts, No Glory, earlier this year. The band tapped Dave Aron to produce the 11-track release.

EC17HEAD_2_WEBLonestar Under the Stars
Lonestar, the award-winning, multi-platinum country music quartet with crossover smash hits like “Amazed,” “I’m Already There’’ and “Come Cryin’ to Me,” will headline the 2014 Misericordia University Under the Stars Summer Arts Festival on Saturday, July 19 in support of its studio album, Life As We Know It.
Lonestar is engaged in a more than 90-city tour in support of its first album with original lead singer Richie McDonald since the group produced Mountains’in 2006. With McDonald, other founding members Michael Britt (lead guitar, backing vocals), Keech Rainwater (drums) and Dean Sams (keyboards) will perform their classic hits, as well as new songs such as “With My Eyes Open’’ and “Just the Rain.’’
Tickets for Lonestar are $380 for a festival table that seats six, $35 for amphitheater seating and $20 for lawn seating. Call the Misericordia University Box Office at (570) 674-6719 to purchase tickets.

EC17HEAD_4_WEBMight As Well Jump and Party Down
Local drummer/promoter A.J. Jump is celebrating his 30th birthday on Saturday, July 19 with a great lineup of local bands (including several projects he’s involved in) at River Street Jazz Cafe, Plains. Acts to appear include Abstract Peoples, Indigo Moon Brass Band, DJ Hersh, Coal Town Rounders, Charles Havira, King Radio and Robb Brown. Over the last 10 years, Jump has performed and recorded with such acts as Osiris, Black Lung Brothers, The Five Percent, Ends With Disaster, MiZ, Underground Saints and more.

 

 

 

Here’s what’s in my headphones this week: Wye Oak Shriek (Merge Records) 2014.

Jewish Food Festival

Jewish Food Festival

Food, Funny and Jewish Bluegrass
The Jewish Food Festival finds a home at Nay Aug Park

 

The Jewish Food Festival will be held outdoors for the first time, on Sunday, July 13. The air in Nay Aug Park, Scranton will tease your nose with the savory aromas of corned beef on rye, stuffed cabbage, knishes, kreplach and kugel mingling with sweet tooth-tickling chocolate babka, rogelach, apple strudel and sugar kichel.
Laible Blu, described as “Jewish bluegrass,” will provide the soundtrack for the afternoon.
MODI, a New-York-via-Israel comedian, will end the festival with laughter.
But the headlining act is the food.
The Jewish Food Festival features Jewish food, Israeli food and kosher grill items. Rabbi Benny Rapoport, co-director of the Jewish Community Center in Clarks Summit, said part of the fun of Jewish food is the diversity.
“Jewish food is enjoyed by people of all walks of life, particularly the Israeli food,” Rapoport said. “That’s part of the beauty of Jewish food is how it’s drawn on different cultures. And that’s why we have American barbeque, after all, we are Americans and who doesn’t love a good, delicious hot dog with toppings and onions and sauerkraut? It’s all good stuff.”
Rapoport explained that Jewish cuisine is diverse due to immigration patterns.
“The Jewish people have been around so many different places and have wandered from place to place always looking for opportunities to have freedom of religious practice and for many centuries Jews were in the Middle East,” said Rapoport. “And then they went to Europe. And then the bulk of the Jewish world came to the Lower East Side, so that’s when all the smoked meats, pickled meats, salted meats became very popular.”
Rapoport said even the popular knish is a product of past socio-economic reality, explaining that a knish — a piece of dough usually filled with potatoes or buckwheat kasha — was a way to make a meal out of something simple.
“So you’re leaving the house, you’re going on a journey, you’re a peddler, you don’t have time to start cutting and prepping, so you just take this knish,” he said. “It’s a fast, filling, simple snack, which has become cliché or an icon. It’s a symbol of Jewish food.”
The food at the festival will be kosher, which is difficult to find in our area, according to Rapoport. “It is quite complex and for the truth of the matter, this is a rarity when (those who keep kosher) can go to a festival where everything is top-level kosher and top-level delicious.”
Comedian MODI, born Mordechai Rosenfeld, moved to the United States at age 7. He worked as an investment banker until his coworkers encouraged him to try stand-up comedy. According to the comedian’s website, The Hollywood Reporter named him “one of the top 10 comedians in New York City,” while the New York Times called him “the next Jackie Mason.”
“The more opportunities we have to build bridges, unite communities, to express our commonalities and to experience other people’s cultures, I think this is the way we not only bring people together, but that’s how we reach out community, when people come and say ‘wow, look what Scranton has in the summer! It’s amazing. It’s a great place to come visit. It’s a great place to live,’” said Rapoport.
“We have a lot of plans for this property to create a wonderful space for the community at large. We want to put trails, bike rentals, a snow sled park. There is so much we want to do over time. We have to do it in small stages, to really raise up our whole community — Jew and non-Jew alike.”
The center hosts various events during the year, which are meant to provoke thought and create community discussions. Rapoport encourages education and said the center will house 2,000 books for adults and children. Last year, it sponsored a lecture on Islam. Admission was free and Rapoport said about 180 people attended. “In a way, we’re all different, but we’re all the same-different,” explained Rapoport.
“In other words, we all have the same similarities, but we call it something else. The Italian community, Irish-Catholic community, Jewish community, the African-American community — we all have our differences, but we’re all the same in that we all are different than the ‘lily white.’ … E Pluribus Unum is on the coin and it means ‘out of many one.’ It’s not that equality — and people think equality is important because it means we’re all the same — no, equality means within our diversity, we can truly become one. An orchestra, not everyone is playing the violin. Someone is playing the violin, someone is playing the oboe, the clarinet and in their own unique way, together make a beautiful symphony.”
To Rapoport, food is the great unifier.
— kimberly m. aquilina

You can go for the food, you can go for the music, you can go for the jokes — or go for the whole festival. Concessions open at 3 p.m. and will close at about 6 p.m., Rabbi Rapoport said. Attendees will need to purchase concession tickets because the food stands won’t accept cash. The comedy show will take place under the tent across from the Everhart Museum from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tickets for the comedy show cost $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Call (570) 587-3300 or visit jewishfoodfest.com or facebook.com/#jewishfoodfest for more information.

Gasoline

Gasoline

Make: Audi
Model: R8 Coupe
Year: 2011
Owner: Josh Bohanon
Specs: Ibis White, 4.2 V8 quattro, 6 speed manual, black leather interior, piano black accents and Titanium 19-inch rims.

20 Warped Years

20 Warped Years

 

Vans Warped Tour Returns to the Pavilion at Montage Mountain

 

Vans Warped Tour 2014 is celebrating 20 years the only way it knows how — by enjoying yet another cross-country trek and delivering a diverse dose of wild acts to music lovers. The world-famous music and lifestyle festival tour of the summer hits the 570 for its annual visit to The Pavilion at Montage Mountain on Wednesday, July 9. The all-day music marathon on the mountain kicks off at 11 a.m.
 

The Protomen

The Protomen

This year’s performers include Aaron West and The Roaring 20s, Bayside, Beebs And Her Money Makers, Bowling For Soup, Crown The Empire, Cute Is What We Aim For, Every Time I Die, Falling In Reverse, Less Than Jake, Lionize, Mayday Parade, MC Chris, Motionless In White, Saves The Day, The Protomen, We Are The In Crowd, We The Kings, Yellowcard and more. (See full line-up in the sidebar).
 
The tour is best known for introducing up-and-coming artists to wider audiences, as well as showcasing major established acts. The festival features a diverse selection of artists based in multiple genres, including punk, metal, indie, rock, hip-hop, rap, electronic dance music (EDM), reggae and pop music. Warped is also known for its traditionally low ticket prices (since the start, tickets for the all-day event do not exceed $40).
 
It all began in 1995 when concert production veteran Kevin Lyman founded the tour. Soon after, Warped was introducing music fans to then featured acts such as No Doubt, Eminem, Katy Perry, Blink 182, Black Eyed Peas, Sublime and My Chemical Romance among hundreds of others. The tour brought punk rock/skate/action sports culture into the national spotlight, with unique attractions, including Vans skating competitions featuring professional and amateur skaters competing for prizes, Reverse Daycare (where kids can check in with their parents while they relax in an air-conditioned lounge) and the Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands, a stage featuring both local contest winners and national acts.
 
EC03WARPED_3_WEBVans Warped Tour also champions many different charitable causes during its summer trek and is the first tour to use groundbreaking environmental concepts every year on the road. The tour continues to implement these concepts known as Warped Eco Initiatives (WEI) which include the use of biodiesel fuel for touring trucks, buses and generators and the implementation of environmentally-friendly catering for the artists and crew. A solar-powered sound system is used on the “Kevin Says Stage” and vanswarpedtour.com provides public transportation and carpool social media app options for fans to connect before every show.
 
Since its inception, the tour has traveled throughout the world giving many diverse acts their first large international exposure to Europe, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. The tour annually reaches more than 600,000 fans in more than 40 cities in North America each summer.

 
If you go:
What: Vans Warped Tour 2014
Where: The Pavilion at Montage Mountain
When: Wednesday, July 9. Show: 11 a.m.
Tickets: $35 plus applicable fees at ticketmaster.com and The Pavilion at Montage Box Office.
 

Lionize

Lionize

Warped Tour Line-up

(subject to change)
 
A Lot Like Birds, A Skylit Drive, Aaron West and The Roaring 20s, Air Dubai, Anthony Raneri, Antiserum, Attila, Bad Rabbits, Bayside, Beartooth, Beebs And Her Money Makers, Blackbird, Blameshift, Born Of Osiris, Bowling For Soup, Breathe Carolina, Brian Marquis, Candy Hearts, Captain Capa, Chelsea Grin, Chunk! No, Captain Chunk!, Close Your Eyes, Courage My Love, Crizzly, Crown The Empire, Cute Is What We Aim For, Dangerkids, DJ Nicola Bear, DJ Scout, Echosmith, Elder Brother, Enter Shikari, Every Time I Die, Falling In Reverse, For All Those Sleeping, For Today, Four Year Strong, Front Porch Step, Get Scared, Ghost Town, Heart To Heart, Hunter Valentine, I Fight Dragons, Ice Nine Kills, Icon For Hire, Issues, Justina Valentine, K. Flay, Less Than Jake, Lionize, Marmozets, Mayday Parade, MC Chris, Mike Herrera, Mixtapes, Mod Sun, Motionless In White, Neck Deep, Nick Santino, NiT GriT, Of Mice And Men, Pacific Dub, Parkway Drive, Pj Bond, Plague Vendor, Pvris, Real Friends, Rob Lynch, Saves The Day, Scare Don’t Fear, SECRETS, Shiragirl, State Champs, Stray From The Path, Survive This!, Teenage Bottlerocket, Terror, The Color Morale, The Devil Wears Prada, The Ghost Inside, The Maine, The Protomen, The Ready Set, The Story So Far, The Summer Set, The Word Alive, TheCityShakeUp, This Wild Life, Vanna, Volumes, Watsky, Wax, We Are The In Crowd, We The Kings, Wind In Sails and Yellowcard.

Sounds: Lady Survivors part two

Sounds: Lady Survivors part two

LILY ALLEN — Sheezus
THE GOOD: British indie bad girl Lily Allen is back after a five-year hiatus.
THE BAD: Too many shifts in direction and changes in attitude.
THE NITTY GRITTY: What made Allen’s first two albums so enjoyable was their musical diversity and sense of fun. Alright, Still (2006) was colored with infectious bits of reggae and ska. It’s Not Me, It’s You (2009) turned up the electronics but kept the pure melodic drive intact. Allen was having the time of her life taking the piss out of smug celebrities and crappy boyfriends. We had just as much fun listening. But perhaps the greatest thing about both albums was that they sounded distinctly British.
Now Sheezus is kind of — forgive me — boring. Allen still gets in more than a few good lyrical jabs, but too much of this album feels like she’s trying to guarantee a hit on the radio … American radio. Blech! Sheezus has its moments, but nothing that demands repeated listens. Maybe next time.
BUY IT?: Meh … whatever.
 
 
EC03SOUNDS_1_WEBNATALIE MERCHANT — Natalie Merchant
THE GOOD: Ex-10,000 Maniacs frontwoman and singer/songwriter Natalie Merchant returns with her first album of all new material in more than a decade.
THE BAD: No complaints.
THE NITTY GRITTY: After doing an acoustic covers record and a children’s concept album, Merchant is getting back to the stuff that made her departure from the Maniacs so much easier to take two decades ago. She remains a consummate songstress. Her voice is still rich and full; her style always compelling. The songs themselves usually tell an exquisite story or at least set a vivid scene.
On this self-titled effort, Merchant brings together all the best elements from her first three solo outings. The folk and pop flavorings of Tigerlily (1995) and Ophelia (1998) come to light during homespun tracks such as “Maggie Said” and “Texas.” The grittier soulful elements from 2001’s Motherland return during simmering Hammond organ tinged tunes like “Go Down Moses” and “It’s A-Coming.”
BUY IT?: Sure. Merchant has crafted a collection of songs that never falters.
 
 
EC03SOUNDS_2_WEBLYKKE LI — I Never Learn
THE GOOD: On her third outing, Swedish songstress Lykke Li finds inspiration within her tumultuous personal life and a change of scenery.
THE BAD: Nine songs in 33 minutes leave us wanting more. However, this is a grand case of quality over quantity. There isn’t an ounce of fat on this record.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Li suffered a bitter break-up and moved from her native country to Los Angeles right before the whole writing process began. Look at the song titles and you know exactly where she’s coming from this time — “Love Me Like I’m Not Made of Stone,” “Never Gonna Love Again ” and “Heart of Steel,” the title cut. Li turned her heartbreak into extremely accomplished songs.
That’s the record’s greatest strength – the songs. While I Never Learn is probably Li’s least exciting set sonically (the woman and long-time producer Bjorn Yttling keep the arrangements straight forward and tight), this group of songs is easily her finest yet.
BUY IT?: Oh yes.
 
Mike Evans is a super cool radio guy who doesn’t mess around when it comes to music. Sounds appears weekly in electric city and diamond city. Email mevans@timesshamrock.com.

Fireworks in The 570

Fireworks in The 570

Explosions in the Sky
 
Independence Day Celebration w/fireworks, July 3. The Tunkhannock Rotary Club sponsors this annual celebration featuring entertainment after 7 p.m., food vendors, fireworks and more. Bring blankets or lawn chairs. Tunkhannock High School, Tunkhannock. Free admission; donations welcome. (570) 831-5233 or tunkhannockrotary.org.
 
Fireworks Display, July 3. Rain date: July 5. Harman-Geist Stadium, Hazleton. (570) 459-3221.
 
Independence Day Fireworks, July 3. Rain date: July 5. Wright Township Park, Mountain Top. (570) 474-9067.
 
American Freedom Festival, thru July 5. This annual Independence Day celebration features a culinary midway of food vendors, children’s carnival rides and live music throughout the day. Fireworks will begin at dusk. Dansbury Park, East Stroudsburg. Free. (570) 421-6591 or eastburgalliance.com.
 
Independence Day Celebration w/fireworks, July 3, 5 p.m. Enjoy music by Moonlight on the Poconos Big Band, The Dixieland All-Stars, The Crystal Band, as well as children’s games, fireworks shot off Irving Cliff and more. Bring your own chairs or blankets. Refreshments available for purchase. Central Park, Honesdale. Free. (570) 253-3855.
 
Philharmonic & Fireworks, July 3, 3:30 p.m. Enjoy music, vendors and fireworks in downtown Scranton after 4 p.m. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic is scheduled to perform at 7:30 p.m. Courthouse Square, Scranton. (570) 963-6800 or lackawannacounty.org.
 
Fourth of July Fireworks, July 4. Celebrate the holiday with fireworks following the RailRiders game against the Buffalo Bisons. PNC Field (Lackwanna County Stadium), Moosic. (570) 969-2255 or swbyankees.com.
 
Fourth of July Celebration, July 4. Enjoy live music and fireworks at dusk. Also find food vendors. Rain date: July 5. Bloomsburg Town Park, Bloomsburg. Free. (570) 389-1947 or bloomsburgpa.org.
 
An Old Fashioned Fourth of July Celebration, July 4. Food vendors, amusements and rides open at noon. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic will present its annual Independence Day concert at 7:30 p.m. Fireworks display begins at dusk. Bring your own blankets or chairs. Kirby Park, Kingston. Free. (570) 208-4240 or wilkes-barre.pa.us.
 
Lake Wallenpaupack Fourth of July Fireworks, July 4. The bleachers open to spectators at 7 p.m. Rain date: July 5. Wallenpaupack Area High School, Hawley. (570) 226-4557 or lakeregioncc.com.
 
Independence Day Celebration w/fireworks, July 4. Includes 5K and 10K runs, patriotic parade, 130 arts and crafts exhibitors, a barbecue, food vendors and fireworks at dusk. Montrose Village Green, Montrose. (570) 525-3672 or EMFOA.org.
 
Fireworks Display, July 4. Lake Ariel, Lake Ariel. lakearielfireco.com.

PHOTO BY JAKE DANNA STEVENS/ TIMES-TRIBUNE

PHOTO BY JAKE DANNA STEVENS/ TIMES-TRIBUNE


 
Fireworks Display, July 4. The Rotary Club of the Abingtons hosts this annual celebration. Food and beverage will be available for purchase after 5 p.m. Also enjoy live music. Raindate: July 5. Bring your own seating. Parking donation of $5 will be used to defray event costs. Abington Heights Middle School, Clarks Summit. Free. (570) 586-1281.
 
Independence Day Celebration w/fireworks, July 5. In addition to fireworks, enjoy music, food vendors, games and more in this annual event benefitting the Shawnee Volunteer Fire Company. Shawnee Mountain Ski Area, Shawnee-On-Delaware. $10/car load. (570) 421-7231 or shawneemt.com.
 
Fireworks Extravaganza, July 5. Gates open at 6 p.m. This annual event is sponsored by The Minisink Lions of North Pocono. Live music, food and refreshments for sale. Live music by The Poets starts art 7 p.m. Rain date: July 6. North Pocono Middle School, Moscow.
 
Fireworks Display, July 5. Skytop Lodge, Skytop. (800) 345-7759 or skytop.com.
 
Family Day Celebration, July 5, 6:30 p.m. The Jessup 21st Century Association’s 18th annual Independence Day festival features performances, live music, face painting and food stands offering hot dogs, wimpies, popcorn, ice cream, pierogies, pizza and more. Fireworks begin at 9:30 p.m. Bring your own blanket or lawn chairs. Veteran’s Memorial Field, Jessup. Donations accepted at the gates.
 
Celebrate Freedom, July 6. Peckville Assembly of God, Peckville. Fireworks at dusk. peckvilleag.org.
 
Dalton Fire Company Carnival, July 8-12. Enjoy pay-one-price rides and daily entertainment. The Fireman’s Parade will be held Friday at 7 p.m. Fireworks begin at 10 p.m. Saturday. Midway by Otto’s Amusements. Dalton Fire Company, Dalton.
 
Fireworks Celebration, July 10 at 9:30 p.m., during Party on the Patio featuring Tramps Like Us, A Tribute to Bruce Springsteen. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Wilkes-Barre. (570) 831-2100 or mohegansunpocono.com.
 
Fireworks Display, July 11. Blakely Borough Recreational Complex, Peckville. (570) 383-3352.
 
Fireworks Display, July 12. Island Park, Schuylkill Haven. (570) 385-2841 or havenislandpark.com.
 
Covington Fireman’s Picnic, July 12-15. Rides by S&S Amusements, food stands and more. Enjoy a Fireman’s Parade on Thursday at 7 p.m. followed by music . Fireworks will be launched on Saturday. Covington Fire, Rescue & EMS, Station 14, Daleville. (570) 842-4130 or covingtonfirerescue.freeservers.com.