Sounds

Sounds

GIRLS AND BOYS DANCE TOGETHER

LITTLE DAYLIGHT — Hello Memory
THE GOOD: Brooklyn-based indie pop trio Little Daylight offers up a decent self-produced debut.
THE BAD: Memory is pleasing but predictable.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Little Daylight falls in with a lot of other current female-fronted electronic-leaning outfits. They’re an Americanized Chvrches, a heavier Echosmith and a more spaced-out Colourist.
Front woman Nikki Taylor and her boys have managed to carve out their own little niche within the genre while not exactly overflowing with innovation. Thankfully though, Memory isn’t short on solid tracks. No unforgettable anthems, but no duds either. Cuts such as the instantly fetching “Overdose” and “Mona Lisa” are big on thick backbeats and kicking choruses.
And the band really shines when they bring in some dreamy ambient (“Be Long”) or seamlessly danceable (“Runaround”) elements. The entire collection is varied enough to avoid falling into a repetitious rut while still retaining a consistent agreeable vibe. Memory ends up being nothing more than very good rhythmic pop … and sometimes I guess that’s enough.
BUY IT?: Why not?

EC11SOUNDS_2_WEBTHE ASTEROIDS GALAXY TOUR — Bring Us Together
THE GOOD: Danish indie pop duo Asteroids Galaxy Tour (vocalist Mette Lindberg and songwriter/producer Lars Iversen) are back with a stupendous interstellar third.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: The pair brings back their heady psychedelic (and very danceable) mix of retro rock and the electronic. Truly a wild seamless set. Disco gets sprinkled atop certain cuts (“Navigator”) while vintage soul permeates others (“My Club”). “Choke It” and “Rock the Ride” are funky party anthems. “I Am The Mountain” and “X” are darker and more serious. Yet even these possess an undeniable spirit both giddy and intoxicating.
Just like AGT’s first two outings, Together is an album designed for pure pleasure, but it’s not a “guilty” pleasure. No, this is quality stuff, extremely well conceived and executed (sometimes even sophisticated). The band’s entire catalog also displays no signs of diminishing quality. So of course, once again, the pair leaves us craving more.
BUY IT?: Definitely.

EC11SOUNDS_1_WEBBROODS — Evergreen
THE GOOD: New Zealand electronic pop duo Broods (brother and sister Caleb and Georgia Nott) give us their full-length debut.
THE BAD: Evergreen is a slick enough set but it brings absolutely nothing new to the table.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Broods is yet another outfit blurring the lines between indie pop, electronic music and modern R&B, with a female vocalist purring and wailing over rhythmic mechanized backdrops. If you think the record sounds an awful lot like Lorde’s debut album Pure Heroine, that’s probably because Evergreen was produced and co-written by Joel Little, the same guy behind Lorde’s entire musical output (so far).
Still, tracks like “Bridges” and “Mother and Father” are not without their strengths — fetching melodies and buzzing humming keyboards carried by liquid beats. Georgia also possesses the right voice for the material. But we’ve been here before and very recently. And since pop music is cyclical, we’ll probably be here again more than a few times in 2015.
BUY IT?: Your choice.

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A STEADY PULSE

ERASURE — The Violet Flame
THE GOOD: British synth-pop duo Erasure (producer/instrumentalist Vince Clarke and vocalist Andy Bell) are still going strong after almost 30 years and 15 albums.
THE BAD: Flame is a record from a group past their creative prime.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Like their synth-pop counterparts Depeche Mode (a band Clarke co-founded well over three decades ago), Erasure is falling into that comfortable rut of releasing a decent album every few years. It’s nothing that would overshadow past triumphs, but good enough to prove the guys are still relevant.
Flame picks up where other releases since the turn of our century (Nightbird, Light at the End of the World, etc.) left off. That is, we get ten songs riding liquid beats while Bell’s soaring falsetto belts out more of Clarke’s precious melodies. Tracks like “Elevation” and “Reason” joyfully bounce around the room while more subdued pieces such as “Be the One” add a touch of blue-eyed soul to the mostly electronic proceedings. Earth shattering? Hardly. Enjoyable? Tremendously.
BUY IT?: Why not?

ey.11183ELECTRIC YOUTH – Innerworld
THE GOOD: Canadian synth-pop duo Electric Youth (instrumentalist Austin Garrick and vocalist Bronwyn Griffin) gives us a sparkling debut.
THE BAD: Don’t expect perfection. However, Innerworld is a damn fine launching point.
THE NITTY GRITTY: No, the two didn’t take their name from the old Debbie Gibson album (“Lost In Your Eyes” anyone?), but EY do often find themselves drifting through the more synthetic sounds of the 80s. Innerworld is a slightly retro album celebrating all things digital and somewhat gentle, harkening back to the feel of Yazoo, OMD and Xymox.
The two first made a splash a couple of years ago when their dreamy “A Real Hero” (included here) popped up on the Drive movie soundtrack (awesome flick, BTW). Innerworld is now more of the same, breezy hypnotic pop gems riding steady, yet subtle, beats. Tracks like “We Are the Youth” and “Without You” pull us in with Griffin’s delicate vocals guiding quaint melodies. The pulsating backdrops then keep us locked in place.
BUY IT?: Yep.

EC04SOUNDS_1_WEBALT-J — This Is All Yours
THE GOOD: British indie rock outfit Alt-J release a low-key second effort.
THE BAD: Yours suffers from not necessarily a sophomore slump, but rather a slump in general.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Most listeners can’t help but call Alt-J a “new Radiohead.” However, in this case, that’s not really a term of endearment, more like “this is what the band is aspiring to, but it’s just not happening.” For Yours does possess the muted vocals, low burning guitars and heavy atmosphere. But this record is sorely lacking in a reason to come back for a second listen. The melodies are flat and the entire affair drags after a few cuts.
There are times when Yours almost takes off. “Choice Kingdom” is hauntingly pretty. “Hunger of the Pine” is quirky, built around an unexpected Miley Cyrus sample. “The Gospel of John Hurt” almost latches onto a subdued groove … not quite. There are glimmers of hope, yet they all feel like lost opportunities.
BUY IT?: Your decision.

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Sounds

THANKS FOR THE MELODIES

THE RAVEONETTES — Pe’ahi
THE GOOD: Danish indie rock duo Raveonettes release a noisy (as usual) melodic (of course) seventh.
THE BAD: No complaints, but prepare for a change in focus.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Named after a Hawaiian surfing spot and partly inspired by the death of guitarist/vocalist Sune Rose Wagner’s father, Pe’ahi explores the usual dark territories of any Raveonettes album. However, there’s a little less sarcasm and humor this time and a bit more instrumental experimentation with the band moving beyond the usual rudimentary beats and Jesus and Mary Chain guitar fuzz.
Though most of its melodies are strong, the album’s distinct and abrasive beauty can be found within the backing tracks. Underneath all the harmonies and Sharin Foo’s haunting wispy solo turns, there’s an array of funky (sometimes recognizable) drum loops, pretty little countermelodies and even the occasional delicate harp or choir arrangement. Longtime fans shouldn’t panic. There are still mounds of buzzing six-strings. However, this album hails from a more “somber” place than past records.
BUY IT?: Surely.

EC25SOUNDS_2_WEBNEW PORNOGRAPHERS — Brill Bruisers
THE GOOD: Canadian indie supergroup New Pornographers are back together after a four-year hiatus.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Led by power pop and melodic mastermind A.C. Newman, the band finds themselves getting over some trying times personally and looking ahead to a future that’s so bright they gotta wear shades. There’s an undeniable exuberance to Bruisers, easily the most multi-colored and “new wave” of all the bands albums.
Swirling synths never dominate the guitars, but make their presence known more than ever before, recalling that delicate balance found by The Cars decades ago. Destroyer’s Dan Bejar and alt-country goddess Neko Case both return and take on some lead vocal duties — Bejar also composing his usual small handful of songs. And even these crew members sound livelier than ever.
Little gems like “War on the East Coast,” “Marching Orders” and the title cut are sharp and infectious while the album’s momentum never trails off, even during the softer bits. Stability has been achieved.
BUY IT?: Yep.

EC25SOUNDS_3_WEBTHE VASELINES — V for Vaselines
THE GOOD: Scottish indie rockers The Vaselines return with their third.
THE BAD: No gripes.
THE NITTY GRITTY: After forming almost 30 years ago, The Vaselines released a couple of EP’s and one full-length album before unceremoniously imploding around 1990. But the band’s core (the boy-girl duo of Eugene Kelly and Frances McKee) wrote enough catchy post-punk tunes to become a major influence on Nirvana and a host of other 90s acts, thereby securing a place in rock history.
2010 saw the pair reform to give us Sex with an X, an infectious gritty collection that picked up right where the band left off 20 years prior. Now V for Vaselines is yet another dose of that formula so tasty, you wouldn’t dare ask them to change it. Tracks like “High Tide Low Tide” and “One Lost Year” are big on bold melodies, slick harmonies, shaking tambourines and plenty of “Ba Ba Ba Bas” — joyous noises that leave you hungry for more.
BUY IT?: Yes.

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Sounds

MORE THAN A TIGHT RHYTHM

BEAR IN HEAVEN — Time Is Over One Day Old
THE GOOD: Brooklyn-based indie rockers Bear in Heaven are back with an interstellar fourth.
THE BAD: Time isn’t tight. The band lets the music breathe and fill large spaces. Not “bad,” but keep an open mind and go with the flow.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Combining neo-psychedelic electronics with guitar fuzz, BIH’s music lands deep within a canyon surrounded by the Flaming Lips’ quirks, Animal Collective’s hyperactive sense of melody and the Beta Band’s laid-back tendencies. Vocalist/lyricist and primary producer Jon Philpot is still steering the ship, keeping things multi-layered and unpredictable.
Time begins as a focused yet otherworldly pop album; songs like “Autumn” and “If I Were To Lie” built with bold melodies and more traditional structures. Moving on, the record mellows a bit (“The Sun and the Moon and the Stars”) before switching on more electronics (“Demon”) and then finally sliding into way-out experimental territories (the inviting drone of “Dissolve the Walls”). It’s a fascinating journey.
BUY IT? Yep.

EC20SOUNDS_2_WEBSIMIAN MOBILE DISCO — Whorl
THE GOOD: British electronic duo Simian Mobile Disco return with a very spacey set.
THE BAD: No real complaints.
THE NITTY GRITTY: SMD began life as the technology obsessed side project of James Ford and Jas Shaw from the now defunct Simian. For the past decade, the two have been creating boundless electronic works that have flirted with just about every sub-genre there is; some records noisy and heavy, others more restrained and “pop friendly.”
Whorl is the guys’ dedicated step into ambient techno territory. Recalling that genre’s mid-90s heyday, the album begins in swirling “beatless” territories, resembling some long forgotten Orb EP. Once the liquid beats kick in, we suddenly find ourselves remembering dark nights spent grinding to the Future Sound of London.
The album spends a little over an hour bouncing between these two not-so-extremes, pulsating cuts with well-defined grooves and pieces more than willing to melt into the background. A delicate balance is maintained, and the set is better for it.
BUY IT? Yep.

EC20SOUNDS_1_WEBCARIBOU — Our Love
THE GOOD: Canadian writer/producer/performer Dan Sanity (current stage name Caribou) gives us a very personal sixth.
THE BAD: Nothing.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Sanity started making records under the moniker Manitoba around the turn of the century. At first, albums were made up mostly of sound collages (some tranquil, others abrasive) and quirky electronic pop tracks. As things progressed and further records came together, and after he switched names to Caribou, Sanity brought in hip-hop elements and more traditional song structures. All of this progression came together on 2010’s stunning Swim; still the man’s finest and most commercially successful to date.
Our Love is now Sanity’s “thank you” of sorts; the guy out to show his fan base a funky good time. Tracks like “Silver” and “All I Ever Need” wrap their subtle blips and bloods around solid clicking rhythms and Sanity’s own soulful falsetto. Other constructed moments such as “Dive” and “Julia Brightly” prove the more experimental side of his music remains intact and intense.
BUY IT? Yes.

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Sounds

LONE LADIES —
WEEK THREE

YELLE — Completement Fou
THE GOOD: French singer Julie Budet and/or the trio she heads up (the moniker “Yelle” refers to either one) comes back with a dynamic third.
THE BAD: No.
THE NITTY GRITTY: As the group continues, their records are more varied. Completement Fou is easily the most “pop” of all their albums; a set about much more than just keeping a dance floor moving. Of course, you still get a satisfying helping of danceable anthems with Budet way out in front egging on the crowd in her native tongue and making the whole happening very lively.
This time however, you also move to a decent amount of low-key mid-tempo bits that show off Budet’s singing skills while demonstrating the woman is NOT just a one-dimensional club queen. This album is deeper than its predecessors, and while some detractors could claim Completement Fou loses steam during its final third, that very change in tempo makes repeat listens all the more alluring.
BUY IT?: Yes.

EC13SOUNDS_2_WEBZOLA JESUS — Taiga
THE GOOD: Singer/songwriter/producer Zola Jesus (real name Nika Danilova) creates a vast third outing.
THE BAD: Taiga, a Russian phrase for “forest,” feels like it’s more about filling a huge space as opposed to churning out succinct pop songs. Nothing wrong with that. Just prepare for a cool headphones record that has to “seep in” to your consciousness and not a collection that will immediately grab you on every level.
THE NITTY GRITTY: The album keeps you guessing, bouncing from the catchy electro-pop of “Dangerous Days” to the eerie echo-drenched “Dust” to the hectic drum-and-bass colored “Hunger” without flinching. Despite the changes in tempo and mood though, Taiga maintains an overall vibe of “wild” tranquility; harsh electronics used to create something that feels warm and organic.
Plus the songs themselves are just GOOD. Danilova paints each cut with the proverbial “whistles and bells” to add texture, but most of these tracks would be just as effective bare. Taiga ends up a natural and solid progression.
BUY IT?: Yep.

EC13SOUNDS_1_WEBBANKS — Goddess
THE GOOD: Los Angeles singer-songwriter Banks (Jillian Rose Banks) offers up a brooding debut.
THE BAD: Goddess could use a good trim … or maybe a change in tempo?
THE NITTY GRITTY: Banks is yet another female singer born in the late 80s/early 90s, and fed a steady diet of Tori Amos and Fiona Apple while growing up in a musical landscape dominated by a whole lot of hip-hop and female-fronted R&B. Like predecessors Florence and the Machine, Lana Del Rey and Lorde, her music blurs the lines between indie pop, electronica and soul.
Goddess is an hour-long marathon of mid-tempo, R&B flavored, somewhat steamy songs guided by a girl who would probably rather be considered “misunderstood indie chick” as opposed to “white soul diva.” Too harsh? Sorry, but Goddess sounds too much like a bunch of records we’ve heard over the past year, a lot by those other aforementioned artists. And after awhile, the damn thing simply melts into the wallpaper.
BUY IT?: Maybe not.

Sounds: Nov. 6, 2014

Sounds: Nov. 6, 2014

LONE LADIES — WEEK TWO

 
LIA ICES — Ices
THE GOOD: California-based singer/songwriter Lia Ices comes back with a slightly spooky third.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: The woman further embraces a mix that brings together warm organic rock and icy electronics. Ices’ affected vocals throughout the album remind one of the multi-layered harmonious tones of the Cocteau Twins’ Elizabeth Fraser, while the music itself feels primal in spots like the tribal rhythms carrying an Emiliana Torrini record. Tracks like the stomping “Tell Me” and lead single “Higher” almost feel jubilant.
Other songs bring in the more haunting elements. Tunes such as the somewhat funky “How We Are” and fragile cascading “Waves” seem to float on air as they play, the latter practically angelic yet still eerie. Depending upon your current mood, Ices will either transport you to some lush green getaway as the sun is slowly setting, or the far reaches of an already dark outer space. Either way, it IS an album in which you become completely enraptured.
BUY IT?: Definitely.
 
EC06SOUNDS_1_WEB
KIMBRA — The Golden Echo
THE GOOD: New Zealand singer/songwriter Kimbra offers up a huge eclectic sophomore album.
THE BAD: Echo might be TOO huge.
THE NITTY GRITTY: I take it she’s going for an unpredictable indie pop/R&B hybrid with Echo (that’s what I hear anyway). And for the most part, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Funky bits like “Nobody but You” and “Miracle” show off the girl’s pipes and tight sense of rhythm. Tracks such as the manic “Madhouse” and the swirling “Carolina” prove the woman unafraid to take chances.
Too bad some other experiments fall flat. “90’s Music” throws in everything but the kitchen sink and ends up sounding forced and cluttered. “Waltz Me to the Grave” is the bloated progressive closer that reaches far beyond its own grasp. Here you definitely take the good with the misguided.
BUY IT?: Still, yes. Echo is flawed, but it shows a singer expanding her musical horizons. Now Kimbra has to figure out which direction is best for her.
 
EC06SOUNDS_3_WEB
IMOGEN HEAP — Sparks
THE GOOD: British singer/songwriter/producer Imogen Heap makes a sprawling fourth album.
THE BAD: The record was initially released in pieces over the past couple of years. That’s only “bad” if the sporadic unveiling of the music muted the overall punch of hearing the entire album for the first time.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Sparks works really well as a completed project. This is a headphones record; an album that transcends the usual simplicity of electronic pop. Heap and her smoky voice give us a number of melodic tracks carried by clicking fragile beats; tracks with seamless traditional structures like “Entanglement” and “Run Time.”
In between those divine moments, the woman changes up the formula to include Indian flavors (“Minds without Fear”), wild multi-layered vocal experiments (“The Listening Chair”) and hypnotic droning works (“Cycle Song”). Unpredictability is Sparks’ greatest strength and no two cuts sound alike. Yet they all come together to form something bold and dramatic; a set that feels surprisingly warm despite its mechanical origins.
BUY IT?: Surely.
 
Mike Evans is a super cool radio guy who doesn’t mess around when it comes to music. Sounds appears weekly in electric city and diamond city.
Email: mevans@timesshamrock.com.

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LONE LADIES —
WEEK ONE

JENNY LEWIS — The Voyager
THE GOOD: Indie singer/songwriter Jenny Lewis is finally back.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: It’s been six years since Lewis’ last solo outing and four since her collaboration with Jonathan Rice. Last year saw a Rilo Kiley rarities collection (that band now officially and sadly defunct), but new music from the indie goddess is more than welcome.
Produced by Ryan Adams, The Voyager is easily the slickest record in Lewis’ solo catalog. Rabbit Fur Coat (2006) and Acid Tongue (2008) both leaned heavily in the realm of alt-country and modern folk — rock albums at their core but with a dominating homespun charm. This new record is more straight-forward indie pop and the closest Lewis has ever come to her past in the aforementioned Rilo Kiley.
Adams’ precise production helps make confident tunes like “Head Underwater” and “Just One of the Guys” cool and breezy, but the end results never feel over-produced. We end up with a simmering West Coast collection that rarely falters.
BUY IT?: Surely.

EC30SOUNDS_2_WEBSINEAD O’CONNOR — I’m Not Bossy, I’m the Boss
THE GOOD: Indie legend and Irish bad girl Sinead O’Connor is back with her tenth.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: If 2012’s How About I Be Me (And You Be You) was seen as the singer/songwriter’s return to form, I’m the Boss is its logical follow-up. When taken together, both records find the quality of O’Connor’s work on an upswing.
Lyrically, O’Connor breaks away from the politics and social causes (for the most part) and focuses on her (or someone’s) sexuality, relationships and life experiences. Musically, the set is the usual mix of cathartic pop, slightly funky pieces and gentle yet stirring moments. The new album has more teeth though; O’Connor not holding back the raw emotion on jagged cuts like “The Voice of My Doctor” and “Take Me to Church.”
BUY IT?: Yes. More than 25 years into a truly eclectic career, the woman still possesses one of the most haunting and seductive female voices on the planet.

EC30SOUNDS_3_WEBKAREN O — Crush Songs
THE GOOD: Yeah Yeah Yeahs frontwoman Karen O offers up a solo record.
THE BAD: Practically an album of finished and unfinished demos, Crush Songs is a very off-the-cuff intimate affair. Don’t expect a fully realized studio effort.
THE NITTY GRITTY: According to the liner notes, O wrote and recorded these songs in private when she was “crushing a lot.” So there’s a sense of urgency, perhaps getting the tunes on tape before the current crush dissipated and all of the emotion disappeared. Most of the tracks are lo-fi studies of just O and her acoustic guitar, yet some boast rudimentary drum machines, echo and double-tracked voices. A couple even sound finished to the point that they would probably make decent YYY cuts (“Day Go By” has definite potential).
In the end though, Crush Songs feels messy and self-indulgent —compelling only to those rabid fans that must hear absolutely everything this woman has ever recorded
BUY IT?: Meh … only obsessive Yeah Yeah Yeahs people need apply.

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Sounds

PHASED IN AND
FUZZED OUT

CYMBALS EAT GUITARS — Lose
THE GOOD: New Jersey indie rockers Cymbals Eat Guitars bring the noise on their third full-length.
THE BAD: The guys make you work for it. Lose is good — maybe even great — but it takes a few spins to fully sink in.
THE NITTY GRITTY: After some line-up changes, CEG now feels more like an actual band and less like a group of temporary players subject to the whims of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Joseph D’Agostino. Lose is more cohesive than the first two records.
Bringing in elements of loud shoegaze, early Pavement and sprawling Built to Spill, the guys make a big noise that falls somewhere between post-punk’s sloppy urgency and progressive rock’s intricate unpredictability. Some tracks like soaring opener “Jackson” twist and turn, unafraid of changing textures and tempos, while others such as “XR” spit fire and get to the point. “Child Bride” is achingly tragic. “Chambers” gets down after dark. Who knows what’s next?
BUY IT?: Yes. If nothing else, Lose remains intensely interesting.

 

 

EC23SOUNDS_1_WEBGRACES DOWNFALL — Change Adjust Continue
THE GOOD: NEPA’s own Graces Downfall releases their third full-length.
THE BAD: Fresh? Exciting? Maybe not.
THE NITTY GRITTY: OK, these guys are tight. The band fires off a scorching mix of what used to be “alternative” with a fierce layer of metal over the top. I suspect there are probably more than a few Staind, Tool and Papa Roach CDs lurking in these dudes’ old music collections.
But that’s the problem. GD is everything you hated about the late 90s and mainstream aggro-rock in general. Nothing here is as bad as … say … Puddle of Mudd, but it’s hard to take the heavy-handed social commentary of an angst-riddled song like “Scranton” seriously. And closing cut “Leah” is easily the most cloying ballad about a kid since Creed’s “With Eyes Wide Open.” Her smile so perfect/Without a tooth.
BUY IT?: I know the band has legions of local fans … so support them if you must. The rest of us will just move on and never speak of Change again.

 

 

EC23SOUNDS_3_WEBROYAL BLOOD — Royal Blood
THE GOOD: British duo Royal Blood studies the basics on their tough debut.
THE BAD: Nothing “bad” — just old fashioned blues-based rock ‘n’ roll. No innovation, but the record cranks.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Following other modern “revival” acts such as Wolfmother and Rival Sons, Royal Blood is simply the latest English collective supposedly saving “real” rock. You get a mix of those aforementioned acts along with some Raconteurs/Dead Weather Jack White-type stuff and a sprinkle of the Black Keys.
All the songs come in around three minutes so there’s no room for elaborate solos or progressive posturing. Tunes like “Out of the Black” and “Careless” make their point and get out of the way for the next blast of power-packed rocket fuel. Vocalist/bassist Mike Kerr cites Queens of the Stone Age as a major influence and you can hear that. Royal Blood is crunchy and tight, but also melodic in all the right places.
BUY IT?: Sure. The album may be flawed but it leaves us wanting more.

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Sounds

NOISE FROM THE SHADOWS

SPOON — They Want My Soul
THE GOOD: After taking time off to recharge their batteries, Texas indie rockers Spoon return with a rock solid eighth.
THE BAD: No gripes.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Frontman/songwriter Britt Daniel and his crew could take their blend of no-nonsense soulful rock with its airtight rhythms and bruised guitars, make the same album over and over again and not too many people would complain. Their stuff always turns out sneakily intelligent and incredibly infectious.
Perhaps the secret to Spoon’s longevity though is the fact they could keep making the same record, but don’t. Every jewel in the catalog has its own unique twist. On Soul, the band sounds more aware (proud?) of its identity than ever before. Songs like “Knock Knock Knock,” “Let Me Be Mine” and the title cut buzz and hum like a well oiled machine yet still retain a slightly dangerous spontaneity. This train can spin off the rails at any time, but we’re still grooving.
BUY IT?: Oh yes.

EC02SOUNDS_1_WEBINTERPOL — El Pintor
THE GOOD: New York indie rockers Interpol have regrouped and now offer their fifth.
THE BAD: The band has yet to top their first two records (2002’s Turn on the Bright Lights and 2004’s Antics). El Pintor also doesn’t, but it’s a step in the right direction and comes in at a not-too-distant third.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Now a trio, the band took time off after touring behind their weakest, 2010’s maudlin self-titled effort. They sound re-energized. While El Pintor doesn’t reek of innovation or much progression, the songs are certainly better.
There are moody bits harkening back to the band’s haunting debut; slow burns like “Breaker 1” and “Twice and Hard.” For the most part though, the set is big on jagged guitars and rhythms stacked with forward momentum. Cuts like “All the Rage Back Home” and “Everything Is Wrong” retain the dark atmosphere, but also pack on the forceful backbeats and killer hooks.
BUY IT?: Yes. Then dig in deep or just enjoy the ride.

EC02SOUNDS_2_WEBDEATH FROM ABOVE 1979 — The Physical World
THE GOOD: Canadian dance/punk duo DFA79 (drummer/vocalist Sebastien Grainger and bassist/keyboardist Jesse F. Keeler) return with a blistering sophomore effort.
THE BAD: Ten years is a long time to wait for a second album. Expectations may be too high.
THE NITTY GRITTY: The guys broke up due to “creative differences” after touring for 2004’s genre-bending You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine. The two later shook hands in 2011, played some shows and finally got around to recording the Physical World with producer Dave Sardy (Cold War Kids, Nine Inch Nails, OK GO).
We get 11 fiery anthems in 36 minutes, with the record’s sequencing frantic and leaving little room to breathe. Tracks like “Right On Frankenstein” and “Gemini” blur the lines between punk and the electronic, garage rock and even nu metal. The duo madly jumps amongst the varying styles with wicked abandon. The end result is punchy, loud and catchy — not necessarily a bold step forward, but it gets the job done.
BUY IT?: Sure.

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FLIGHTS OF FANCY

BLEACHERS — Strange Desire
THE GOOD: Jack Antonoff, mastermind of Fun, starts a new band and calls it Bleachers.
THE BAD: Fun isn’t finished, so it’s difficult to look at Strange Desire as little more than an accomplished side project. Maybe forget all the “band parameters” and just go with it?
THE NITTY GRITTY: The album’s first half isn’t all that different from a Fun set with Antonoff churning out tight catchy indie pop anthems like the seamless “Rollercoaster” and fist-pumping sing-along “I Wanna Get Better.”
The second half of Strange Desire finds our boy stretching beyond previous boundaries, collaborating with the likes of electronic pixie Grimes (the liquid “Take Me Away”) and legendary avant-garde artist Yoko Ono (the ghostly “I’m Ready to Move On/Wild Heart Reprise”).
Antonoff ends up creating something miles apart from Fun and yet this new music somehow complements the work of his already established band. Longtime fans will find themselves challenged in spots, but they should all discover much to embrace.
BUY IT?: Sure.

EC25SOUNDS_1_WEBBASEMENT JAXX — Junto
THE GOOD: British electronic duo Basement Jaxx (DJ’s/producers/composers Simon Ratcliffe and Felix Buxton) are back with their seventh full-length (and first in five years) Junto.
THE BAD: A Basement Jaxx record has never sounded this “safe.”
THE NITTY GRITTY: The first half of Junto finds the guys stuck in a dance-pop rut, cranking out a half dozen house cuts with textbook rhythms and interchangeable guest vocalists taking the leads.
The second half sees the boys getting more adventurous so there is some recovery. Cuts like the off-center and cheeky “Buffalo” and the stomping exotic “Mermaid of Salinas” recall some of the more lively jams from earlier triumphs Rooty (2001) and Crazy Itch Radio (2006). But even those vast improvements might be too little, too late. Junto puts you in an indifferent mood early on, like being trapped at a party that just isn’t happening. Maybe dive into the record’s second half first?
BUY IT?: Your choice. Hopefully the next set will be more exciting.

EC25SOUNDS_2_WEBLETTING UP DESPITE GREAT FAULTS — Neon
THE GOOD: Texas-based indie dream-pop outfit Letting Up Despite Great Faults returns with their ethereal third full-length.
THE BAD: A handful of the songs feel half-cooked — petering out before reaching their final glorious destination. After awhile though, Neon becomes more about an overall vibe anyway, with the individual parts forming a much greater whole.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Frontman and founder Mike Lee keeps things beat-driven but airy. Annah Fisette adds more Technicolor to the proceedings by offering up female vocals of which Lee can play off; the two voices ending up somewhere between the Postal Service and vintage Book of Love.
One detects shades of early Cure during the faster jagged bits and snippets of mid-period New Order within some of the basslines. Then you have the obligatory comparisons to contemporaries like M83 and the Pains of Being Pure at Heart.
The entire brew becomes something very retro, melodic, rhythmic and hypnotic. So dance or drift — the choice is entirely yours.
BUY IT?: Sure.

Sounds

Sounds

THE INTENSITY VARIES

STAGNANT POOLS — Geist
THE GOOD: Indiana indie duo Stagnant Pools (brothers Bryan and Douglass Enas) give us a fiery, spontaneous second effort.
THE BAD: It takes a while for Geist to sink in — what seems one-dimensional at first sounds more fully realized later. Give it a fair shot.
THE NITTY GRITTY: After releasing their first album, Temporary Room, two years ago, the brothers were rightfully compared to a lot of noise-infused acts like Joy Division, Sonic Youth and especially the Jesus and Mary Chain. Those feedback-heavy elements are certainly present on Geist.
However, there’s now another vibe running through this wicked live-to-tape album that was completely recorded and mixed in the span of about five days. I was reminded of the better American rock bands that were an offshoot of the grunge movement almost 25 years ago — rough-around-the-edges outfits like Screaming Trees, Paw and Jawbox. There’s a very effective “murkiness” flooding Geist; a fresh take on some long dormant sounds.
BUY IT?: Sure.

EC18SOUNDS_2_WEBREIGNING SOUND — Shattered
THE GOOD: North Carolina indie rockers Reigning Sound come back sharper after a five-year hiatus.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Singer/guitarist/songwriter Greg Cartwright has always been the one constant in this band of revolving-door musicians; a slave to the garage-rock ethos since long before garage rock was the “new” thing at the turn of our century. Back in 2001, the White Stripes and the Strokes got the glory. Cartwright was just as authentic.
Subsequent years and releases have seen more roots and country elements sneaking their way into the tunes, but Cartwright has never sacrificed rawness. Shattered finds the band with a fresh lineup and a sound that’s equal parts contemporary (Wilco and Jack White) and a throwback to our distant blues/rock past (Canned Heat and Country Joe & the Fish). There’s even a dash of Memphis soul sprinkled over a few cuts.
Ballad (“I’m Trying”) or forceful rocker (“North Cackalacky Girl”) — Reigning Sound tackles them both with equal skill and passion.
BUY IT?: Definitely.

EC18SOUNDS_1_WEBTHE LAST INTERNATIONALE — We Will Reign
THE GOOD: Politically charged New York rockers the Last Internationale unleash a blazing debut.
THE BAD: No gripes.
THE NITTY GRITTY: This down-and-dirty power trio consists of newcomers Delila Paz and Edgey Pires, along with veteran drummer Brad Wilk (Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave). And while their music may not be quite as incendiary as RATM’s, there’s still a lot of fire (and a definite agenda) in tunes like “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Indian Blood” and “Killing Fields.”
Musically, Reign is straight-forward rough-and-tough blue collar rock ‘n’ roll — no frills, no B.S. The band, along with veteran producer Brendan O’Brien (Pearl Jam, Stone Temple Pilots, the Offspring), gives this lean, mean album plenty of muscle. The brazen bits show their razor-sharp teeth, while the more delicate pieces roll around in a nice bluesy swagger. Paz is already a fierce bad-ass rocker chick and the band itself is airtight.
BUY IT?: You must. We Will Reign is one of this year’s finest debuts.

Sounds

Sounds

ARE WE HAVING FUN YET?

NoNoNo — We Are Only What We Feel
THE GOOD: Swedish trio NoNoNo delivers a bouncy debut full-length.
THE BAD: Feel is catchy, but incredibly hollow.
THE NITTY GRITTY: We essentially have two producers and a female vocalist conjuring up modern indie pop in the sing-song folksy half-acoustic, half-electric tradition of contemporaries like Lumineers, Of Monsters and Men and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. This is the stuff wholly embraced by editors who cut movie trailers for teen flicks, ad men pitching ideas to cell phone companies and modern rock radio programmers who like to keep it dull and not too “edgy.”
You get by-the-numbers feel-good fluffy music that sets your toes-a-tapping and turns your brain to mush. The trio actually scored a genuine hit last fall with the joyfully whistling “Pumping Blood” (included here). Feel is nine more tracks cut from the same cloth — infectious little stompers that bleed into one another after about 15 minutes. Nothing disagreeable, but nothing very memorable either.
BUY IT?: Whatever.

lightsoutv15.11183BISHOP ALLEN — Lights Out
THE GOOD: Brooklyn indie rockers Bishop Allen return with their first proper record in five years.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Lights Out works on different levels. On the surface, it’s a damn infectious indie pop record. Songs like bright opener “Start Again” and the slightly melancholy “Good Talk” are built with decent beats and better melodies.
Listen again and complexities begin to bubble to the surface. Lights Out is much more varied than you initially thought. Amongst all the sheer pop bombast are tunes like “Black Hole” and “Shadow;” gentler emotional moments made even more distinct by Darbie Nowatka’s female vocals. Tracks such as “Hammer and Nail” and “Bread Crumbs” dial up the album’s quirky elements; nothing wrong with these off-center rhythms and weird lyrical images.
It all adds up to a mostly upbeat collection that can enhance your next intimate get together, Sunday morning lay-about or headphones session. Lights Out is worthy of your undivided attention yet doesn’t demand it.
BUY IT?: Definitely.

EC11SOUNDS_1_WEBPHOX — Phox
THE GOOD: Wisconsin indie pop outfit Phox releases a decent debut.
THE BAD: The set loses momentum around its middle and never fully recovers. This is definitely a record of highs and lows.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Led by the low-key yet charming Monica Martin, Phox could cozy up to other modern folk-influenced acts like Lumineers and Mumford and Sons. They certainly use enough acoustic guitars and banjos to warrant the comparison. But Phox also injects a healthy dose of twee into their sound, recalling European female-fronted acts like the Concretes and Camera Obscura.
Intentional or not, this band defies simple categorization and that keeps things interesting. While floating through this eponymous debut, one experiences many flavors, from the gently rolling “1936” to the intensely melancholy “Laura” to the more monumental “Raspberry Seed.”
BUY IT?: Give Phox a shot. Though not flawless, the record finds the band establishing an almost “international” style and laying the groundwork for even better releases further down the road.

Sounds

Sounds

INTERSCOPE’S
ANTI-INGENUES

LANA DEL REY — Ultraviolence
THE GOOD: Singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant (stage persona Lana Del Rey) gives us a dramatic third album.
THE BAD: In essence, Ultraviolence is a “downer.” But there’s no denying the album’s overall quality and uniqueness.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Del Rey is a woman on a downward spiral, obsessed with bad relationships, the seedy underbelly of urban living, drugs and ultimately death. Most tracks are slow to mid-tempo explorations of these “indulgences” sung in Del Rey’s unaffected contralto.
Mostly produced by the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, Ultraviolence plays like a modern blues collection filtered through a thin layer of Hollywood gloss, not completely authentic but still gritty and grainy. One could compare the record to Cat Power’s more haunted works or the stripped-down bits of a Bat for Lashes collection.
Tracks like the title cut and “West Coast” keep things good and gloomy even when the tempos shift slightly upward. The retro fitted “Brooklyn Baby” is strictly for the East Coast hipster in all of us.
BUY IT?: Still … definitely.

EC04SOUNDS_2_WEBROYKSOPP AND ROBYN — Do It Again
THE GOOD: Swedish indie pop queen Robyn teams up with Norwegian electronic duo Royksopp (again) and the end results are nothing short of hypnotizing.
THE BAD: Do It Again falls into that “feels like a side project” trap. But it’s a damn accomplished side project.
THE NITTY GRITTY: These two not-so-disparate acts worked together before on each other’s albums so they were already past the awkward “getting acquainted” phase. But since those past collaborations were always limited to a cut or two, Do It Again really allowed all involved to stretch their collective creativity.
Tight cuts like the thumping title track and the more flirtatious (OK, robotic and sex-crazed) “Sayit” are textbook examples of pristine electronic pop. Longer pieces such as “Monument” and “Inside the Idle Hour Club” are more serious, introspective and seductive in a different way — the works fragile and dreamlike.
BUY IT?: Yes! A full album would have been better, but this 35-minute EP is a pairing that should be savored.

EC04SOUNDS_3_WEBLA ROUX — Trouble In Paradise
THE GOOD: British electronic duo (now solo act) La Roux is back with their (her) sophomore record.
THE BAD: That’s right. Producer Ben Langmaid has left the building, leaving songwriter/vocalist Elly Jackson to go it alone — not that it makes much difference. The new music on Paradise is still slick, catchy and danceable. But was it worth a five-year wait?
THE NITTY GRITTY: That could be Paradise’s biggest problem. So much stuff has happened musically since “Bulletproof” was a hit, you sort of forgot about La Roux. Your inner critic may feel somewhat shortchanged by the new record after the long gap since Jackson’s debut.
In the end, Paradise is just a modern synth-pop record. Good? Yes. Amazingly innovative? Hardly. Tracks like “Cruel Sexuality” and “Silent Partner” are seamless and solid, built with airtight rhythms and big melodies. No bad cuts here, but no great ones either. One will want to visit Paradise without staying too long.
BUY IT?: Your choice.

Sounds: Torch Song Trilogy

Sounds: Torch Song Trilogy

Torch Song Trilogy

THIEVERY CORPORATIONSaudade
THE GOOD: Electronic duo Thievery Corporation (Rob Garza and Eric Hilton) unleash something much more organic than usual.
THE BAD: Saudade is fine, but not nearly as exciting as other TC records.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Here the guys totally embrace the bossa nova. They’ve flirted with elements of this seductive jazzy Brazilian genre before, but this set takes that admiration to a whole new level. Ninety-five percent of the instrumentation is traditional — Spanish guitars, strings, layers of live percussion, etc. They’ve recruited a bevy of female vocalists to purr and coo in our ear, recalling the inimitable style of Astrud Gilberto. The electronics are practically nonexistent. Lyrically, politics are never mentioned.
TC has actually pulled off this radical musical experiment. Saudade is a warm and inviting set. However, the genre hopping and unpredictability of recent collections is sorely missed.
BUY IT?: Your call. Saudade is pretty enough, but the record blends into the background, becoming nothing more than the perfect soundtrack for your next dinner party.
 
EC28SOUNDS_1_WEBJOAN AS POLICE WOMAN The Classic
THE GOOD: Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Joan Wasser returns with her fourth.
THE BAD: No gripes.
THE NITTY GRITTY: Wasser has always blurred the lines between the disparate genres of indie rock and modern R&B. Her roots are in indie, having spent the 90s as electric violinist for Boston faves the Dambuilders. But when it was time to finally sing, her voice came out with a lot of soul.
Any JAPW album has its share of complex arrangements (even dipping a toe in the jazz pool), rough-around-the-edges guitar, brash horn sections, and Wasser’s rich vocal treatments. The Classic is no exception. And as usual, the woman isn’t afraid to let the songs spread out and go wherever they please.
“What Would You Do” begins life loudly before morphing into an intimate one-woman show. “Good Together” is the exact opposite; a resonant low-burning piece that later spins into chaos. “Shame” is powerful (and danceable) driven soul; “Ask Me” a dose of dusty reggae.
BUY IT?: Oh yeah.
 
doc076.11183v6WHITE HINTERLANDBaby
THE GOOD:American singer/songwriter/pianist Casey Dienel gives us her third under the moniker White Hinterland.
THE BAD: Baby isn’t a breezy listen. Dienel challenges her audience throughout this somewhat jagged set. Not “bad,” but be prepared.
THE NITTY GRITTY: The woman flirts with modern R&B and even jazz overtones on some of these cuts. Dienel bounces between stark intimate performances (just her and the 88 keys) and more fully produced and abrasive electronic-leaning tracks. Sometimes Baby is reminiscent of early Fiona Apple. Other times it spins off into weirder Bjork territories. Luckily for Dienel, she’s equally competent in either setting.
Better moments include the rhythmic yet dreamlike “Ring the Bell” (a throwback to 2010’s more fragile Kairos), the red-hot sexually charged “Metronome” and the memorable “Wait Until Dark” which finds the singer alone and at her most vulnerable. Dienel spikes certain performances with genuine emotional chaos, all the while turning up the drama to make the proceedings even more riveting.
BUY IT?: Yes.
 
Mike Evans is a super cool radio guy who doesn’t mess around when it comes to music. Sounds appears weekly in electric city and diamond city. Send email to: mevans@timesshamrock.com.

Sounds

Sounds

TRUE GRIT

JACK WHITE — Lazaretto
THE GOOD: Singer/songwriter/guitarist Jack White returns with his second solo outing.
THE BAD: Nope.
THE NITTY GRITTY: All throughout his days with the White Stripes, Raconteurs and Dead Weather (those latter two bands are still together in some form), White has always done so much with just the basics. Blues with a definite rock slant is at the heart of the man’s work; White is an accomplished guitarist who keeps his playing pure as opposed to flashy.
Lazaretto is the guy’s first record without a succinct direction, but he manages to hold the set together and make it work. Instead of just focusing on the thunderous garage rock of the Stripes, or the raw male-female vocal interplay from the Weather, or even the folk and country flirtations that seep in on many occasions, Lazaretto combines all of these sounds to become a varied collection that rarely stumbles. The music seems to guide White this time, as opposed to the other way around.
BUY IT?: Yes.

EC21SOUNDS_2_WEBFIRST AID KIT — Stay Gold
THE GOOD: Swedish duo (and sisters) First Aid Kit sign to a major label (Columbia), unleash their sparkling third album and offer up their most ambitious stuff yet.
THE BAD: Nothing.
THE NITTY GRITTY: It’s funny (or sad when thinking about the pathetic state of mainstream country these days), but one of the most authentic and American sounding records this year will be Stay Gold — written and recorded by two young ladies from Sweden and produced by indie rock workhorse Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes, Rilo Kiley, Tilly and the Wall, etc).
Once again, the sisters bring on their airtight and lilting harmonies over a steadily chugging backdrop of acoustic guitars, weeping pedal steels and glistening autoharp. The arrangements are fuller this time out, occasional orchestral elements adding color, but the basic aesthetic is still the same. First Aid Kit remains two girls singing about love, heartbreak, family and home; the music pure and relatable. And it’s all oh so good!
BUY IT?: You must.

EC21SOUNDS_3_WEBTHE ANTLERS — Familiars
THE GOOD: The Brooklyn indie rockers are back with a subdued fifth.
THE BAD: Be warned. Familiars is all about mood and texture; a low resonating album that builds oh-so-slowly.
THE NITTY GRITTY: But that moodiness is also the record’s greatest strength. While frontman Peter Silberman’s songs are good, they’re par for the course in the indie rock world. What sets them apart is the presentation. Familiars ends up being one of the most hauntingly striking records that’s come about in quite some time.
Smoky guitars and foggy piano combine with the most integral solo trumpet found in a rock band since the heyday of Cake. The rhythms are tight but never intrusive. Silberman’s vocals blend with the backdrops while not fading completely into them. It’s a noteworthy effect; all parts perfectly equal.
Familiars doesn’t have any weak moments, but the album peaks in the middle. Tracks like the mildly churning “Intruders” and the always escalating “Revisited” find the band at their most inspired.
BUY IT?: Yes.