Bookmarks: SwanDive Premiere

Bookmarks: SwanDive Premiere

Bookmarks

SwanDive Premiere

 
This Friday night, April 11, at the AFA Gallery in downtown Scranton, newly-minted SwanDive Press (swandivepublishing.com) brings you a book launch bursting at the seams with good words to get you going. Everyday Escape Poems, SwanDive’s inaugural publication, features the work of nine Pennsylvania poets, eight of whom will be taking the mic at 7 p.m. Here’s a rundown of the featured poets:
 
Kait Burrier is a New York City gal who writes poetry, drama, journalism and to-do lists. Her work has been published online and in print, as well as performed in Pennsylvania theatres.
Don’t miss this poem: “New York.”
 
A bunch of poetry and fiction by Barbara DeCesare has been featured in numerous literary journals, and adapted for stage, song, and video. She is the author of three collections of poetry.
Don’t miss this poem: “Nancy Drew, Girl Detective, Loses Her Virginity as Medical Necessity to Fend off Hypothermia.”
 
Stanton Hancock is a poet and writer from Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley. He was born in the aftermath of the failed American dream and found his voice in a punk rock basement. His work has appeared spray-painted under bridges and scribbled on scraps of paper.
Don’t miss this poem: “Whitman Hips.”
 
Dawn Leas’s poems and book reviews have appeared in print and online journals, and her chapbook, I Know When to Keep Quiet (Finishing Line Press, 2010), is available in print and Kindle versions. Currently, she is the associate director of the Wilkes University M.A./M.F.A. Creative Writing programs and a contributing editor at Poets’ Quarterly.
Don’t miss this poem: “Older Boys.”
 
Sarah Zane is a poet and science geek from Scranton, PA. She has won a slew of literary awards and founded the Word of Mouth poetry series. She was the 2001 BumberSlam Champion. Sarah served as Scoring Director for the National Poetry Slam in 2001, and as a writing mentor through the Emerging Voice program.
Don’t miss this poem: “She is Gone.”
 
Jim Warner (who will not be at Friday’s event) is the Managing Editor of Quiddity International Literary Journal and Public Radio Program at Benedictine University and the author of two poetry collections Too Bad It’s Poetry and Social Studies (Paper Kite Press). His poetry has appeared in various journals including The North American Review, PANK Magazine, and Drunken Boat. He lives in Springfield, IL.
Don’t miss this poem: “Water and Alloys.”
 
Born and raised amongst carburetors and Susquehanna River water, Dale Wilsey Jr. is a writer, poet, and occasional photographer. His poetry has appeared in the Boston Literary Magazine, Word Fountain, and The Eckleburg Review.
Don’t miss this poem: “Fifty-Fifty.”
 
Eric Wilson is a pipe fitter from the water industry. His work has appeared relatively nowhere due to a debilitating fear of postage stamps, envelope glue, and technology. He is the president of the newly founded SwanDive Publishing Company and cannot wait to meet you in person.
Don’t miss this poem: “Grave.”
 
Columnist Andrea Talarico McGuigan is also featured in this poetry collection.
 
Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in electric city and DC.
Send your literary news to: mcguigan.andrea@gmail.com

Bookmarks: Writers’ Circle of Wayne County

Bookmarks: Writers’ Circle of Wayne County

Bookmarks

by Andrea McGuigan

This Sunday, March 23, the Writers’ Circle of Wayne County brings an afternoon of readings to The Cooperage in Honesdale. From 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., authors Bernard LoPinto, Will Wyckoff, Leslie Rutkin and Dawn McIntyre will be on hand to read from their latest publications and will stay afterwards to sign books.

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Power in the Blood
By Bernard LoPinto
Published by Bernard A. LoPinto, 2011
346 pgs
This novel tells the story of Tim Rathbone, a down-and-out minister who returns to his hometown of Dayton Crossing to find that things have changed, and not for the better. The married couple who had previously taken in Rathbone end up dead, possibly from suicide. The mystery of Rathbone’s father’s death, which happened some twenty years prior, comes back to the forefront when reporter/pretty lady Freddi starts investigating deeper. The religious overtones ask some heavy questions, and the thrilling plot will guarantee you read to the end to get your answers.

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Counting the Days: 366 Days in Prison
By Leslie Rutkin
Published by Authorhouse, 2012
328 pgs
Counting the Days tells the very real story of Leslie and her husband, policeman Matthew Smith, who was jailed for a total of 366 days. Smith, a decorated cop, becomes embroiled in a huge dilemma when the cops he works with go rogue and try to corrupt him. After making a major drug bust, Smith is offered $3000 of illegal money from his fellow policemen. He has a choice — turn the money in and risk his entire career, or take the money and ruin his morality. In the end, he is charged with grand larceny and spends 366 days in jail, writing letters to his wife throughout the year. This is their story.

Zookeeper
By Dawn McIntyre
Published by Dawn McIntyre, 2013
237 pgs
In this novel, Sarah Greene thinks she is wisely investing in real estate when she gets roped in to buying a lake house in a newly-forming community. No one ever warned her that the local residents surrounding this new community would take offense and then action over what they see as the abuse of their local land and environment. Sarah, a tough lady from a biracial family, knows what it means to defend herself against bullies, and it will take everything she’s got to win this fight.

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Birds on a Wire
By Will Wyckoff
Published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012
330 pgs
Wyckoff’s novel may include a fictional president and a North Korean assassin, but the author describes this work as a “non-political” tale of love, friendship, and intrigue. Eli and Rita Parks think they have a chance at new love and a new life together in Montana when Elijah Rittenhouse, America’s second African-American president, warns Eli that he and his family are in serious danger. Eli must collaborate with an old friend to help save his family from the ruthless and determined Hyun Lee, female assassin extraordinaire. The reviews on Amazon are overwhelmingly positive for this thriller of a novel.

Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in electric city and DC. Send your literary news to: mcguigan.andrea@gmail.com.

Bookmarks: Micah Towery

Bookmarks: Micah Towery

Poet Micah Towery studied at Binghamton University and Hunter College before becoming an instructor himself at Indiana University in South Bend. He share selections from his new book Whale of Desire and other recent works at Library Express at The Mall at Steamtown with special guests including Joe Weil, a former teacher, on Saturday, March 8 at 3:30 p.m. The poems in Whale of Desire ($12) have been described as “little miracles of lyric intelligence pitched against a skeptic’s need for faith: faith in God, faith in other people, faith in love and faith that daily life means more than its repetitions and its downward spiral toward death.”

How long have you been writing poetry? How did you come to it?
I grew up musically inclined but always tinkered. Kids are natural tinkerers, like the old country parson doing scientific research in his back garden. I came to capital-P Poetry in high school when I read and started trying to imitate TS Eliot.

Tell me about your writing process. Do you write every day? Do you have a place where you like to write? Walk me through your ritual.
I never gave up the tinkerer approach, so I don’t have a ritual to speak of. I am productive with long stretches of unstructured time. It often starts with some skimming, different books or topics. Ideas converge. Then, as Dickinson says, “a formal feeling comes.”

The poems in your book have a spiritual leaning toward Christianity, though I would never micro-label Whale of Desire as being a “Christian” book of poems. Rather, religion or spirituality seems to be a doorway into your pieces. How do writing and spirituality work together for you?
Because most expression springs from inner life, I think most writing is spiritual. My own inwardness has been explicitly shaped by the Christian tradition–from the Apostle Paul to Augustine, Theresa of Avila to Dorothy Day. Still, readers connect with concrete experiences, so I strive to say what Robert Francis says: “My inner world and outer make a pair.”

There are literary allusions and poetic homage throughout the entirety of your book. I see influences of Frank O’Hara, Seamus Heaney and Robert Hayden, just to name a few. Who can you name as other inspirations or poetic predecessors to your work?
Too many to name and growing all the time! As my teacher, Joe Weil, used to say, “Learn from all. Be loyal to none.” It’s probably better to name my teachers and what I learned from them: Maria Gillan taught me instinct and poetics as a democratic art; Christine Gelineau firmly grounded me in the 20th century poetry; Tom Sleigh gave me access to the classics and a sense of both tradition and lively continuity; Joe Weil taught me that love and self-giving, an openness to the world, creates the only truest art.

What was the process of publication like? Did you submit to many places or was it a more organic process?
Most blind submissions happen through contests these days, but those fees add up! Contests also give the veneer of accolades and accomplishment but don’t always deliver enduring work. I had submitted to some contests but ultimately figured I could wait for the right opportunity. It came faster than I thought: Joe Weil and his wife Emily started a new press and said they wanted mine to be their first book. Small-scale, relationally-driven publishing has always been the norm for poetry. Poetry is more professionalized these days (‘Welcome to po-biz’ writers joke). That’s a boon for some talented folks, but other deserving writers have definitely fallen out of favor undeservingly. I just feel lucky Joe and Emily gave me a platform to share my work.

You have a reading on March 8th?
It’s Saturday afternoon at the Steamtown Mall, 3:30 p.m. in the Library Express. I love libraries, and I love public spaces where people wander in and out. I loved the way Pete Seeger turned his solo art into collective experience. He released control, invited others to have input. I want poetry readings like that. I want people to interact with me and each other. I want people to go out for a good meal after. And buy the book, of course.

Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in electric city and dc.
Send your literary news to: mcguigan.andrea@gmail.com.

Bookmarks: Writers Showcase

Bookmarks: Writers Showcase

Author Le Hinton is the special guest at the next Writers Showcase on Saturday, March 1.

Bookmarks

Writers Showcase

The next installment of the Writers Showcase at The Vintage will be held on March 1 at 7 p.m. at The Vintage, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. The reading series, hosted by Brian Fanelli and Jason Lucarelli, will feature readings by local and visiting writers including Laura Duda, Jeff Rath, Emmalea Russo, Kevin McDonough, Amanda J. Bradley and special guest, Le Hinton.

Laura Duda is a recent graduate of the Wilkes University Creative Writing Master of Arts program. Her fiction has been published in the Osterhaut Library’s Word Fountain, and her non-fiction short story “Bonnie” was published in the Fall 2012 edition of the East Meets West American Writer’s Review and won honorable mention in the 2012 Fall Writer’s Contest. She is employed full-time as the Director of Institutional Research at Lackawanna College where she is also an adjunct instructor in the humanities division, and co-chair of both the Creative Arts Club and First Friday Committee. She is also an adjunct faculty member at Southern New Hampshire University as an instructor in English composition and creative writing.

Jeff Rath is the author of three collections of poetry: The Waiting Room at the End of the World (2007), In the Shooting Gallery of the Heart (2009) and Film Noir (2011), all published by Iris G. Press. His works have been published in a number of journals including Everyday Genius and Fledgling Rag. He is the 2007 R.E. Foundation Award winner and a Pushcart Prize nominee.

Emmalea Russo is a poet and visual artist. Her books are they (forthcoming GAUSS PDF, 2014), CLEAR1NG (dancing girl press, 2013), and book of southern and water (Poor Claudia, 2013). She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Kevin McDonough is a full-time Assistant Professor at Lackawanna College. He teaches a range of English and writing courses including College Writing, Introduction to Literature, Women’s Literature, American Literature to 1900, and Language, Literacy and Play. Kevin also works as an adjunct professor for Marywood University’s English department teaching Composition and Rhetoric, Children’s Literature and Structured Linguistics. He spends his time outside of the classroom writing and performing original music and working on short fiction. His New Year’s resolution for 2014 is to start submitting stories.

Amanda J. Bradley has two books of poems out from NYQ Books: Hints and Allegations (2009) and Oz at Night (2011). She has published poetry and essays in journals including Kin Poetry Journal, The Nervous Breakdown, The Best American Poetry Blog, Rattle, The New York Quarterly and Poetry Bay. She was interviewed in The Huffington Post in April 2013. Amanda is a graduate of the MFA program at The New School and holds a PhD in English and American Literature from Washington University in St. Louis. She is an Assistant Professor at Keystone College.

Le Hinton is the author of four poetry collections including Black on Most Days (Iris G. Press, 2008) and The God of Our Dreams (Iris G. Press, 2010). His work has been published in Gargoyle, Little Patuxent Review, Unshod Quills, Watershed, Off the Coast and in the poetry anthology/cookbook, Cooking Up South. His poem “Epidemic” was the winner of the Baltimore Review’s 2013 Winter Issue contest. In 2012, his poem, “Our Ballpark,” was incorporated into Derek Parker’s sculpture Common Thread and installed at Clipper Magazine Stadium in Lancaster, Pennsylvania as part of the Poetry Paths project.
The event is free, but donations are encouraged to help support The Vintage. Light refreshments will be provided.

Andrea McGuigan’s Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in ec and dc. Send your literary news to: amcguigan@timesshamrock.com.

Bookmarks: Lori May

Bookmarks: Lori May

Bookmarks

 
Author Lori May’s new collection of poetry, Square Feet (Accents Publishing, 2014), deals with the complexities of love, loss, and home-making. The author uses a speaker and a fictional narrative to tell the story of two people making their way. The author is quick to note that the work is not autobiographical, saying, “I’m one of those folks who doesn’t count poetry as non-fiction and I’m trying to ensure, whenever possible, that prospective readers don’t get the wrong impression.” But whether it’s May’s self or another self speaking, it doesn’t matter. The prose is rich, alive, and succinct, a study in the economy of powerful language.
 
Take this piece, for example:
 

“Baggage Claim”

How much would it cost
if relationships charged
baggage fees?
How much would you carry on
and what would you check,
stow away,
possibly leave unclaimed?

 

Author Lori May

Author Lori May


You don’t just write poetry; in fact, you’re known as a cross-genre writer. How is the process of writing a poetry collection, especially one as cohesive as Square Feet, alike and different from writing, say, creative non-fiction?
I’m a fan of story, regardless of genre. In a poetry collection, I hope each individual poem stands alone in its narrative while also contributing to a larger arc. Of course, when I start writing poems for a collection, I may not immediately know what the larger story is, but work to reveal the story over time. It’s really in the editing process where the big picture comes into play and that helps shape where poems appear in sequence. For prose, I feel like much of the process is the same for me. I work word by word, line by line, and don’t always know what the macro vision is until the micro components are laid out in draft form. The only difference in the process, I suppose, is that in my non-fiction I need to ensure I retain the facts while telling an engaging story, whereas in poetry —which I seldom write autobiographically— I have a bit more room to play and invent a story as the arc unfolds.
 
You use the short-form poem very effectively throughout this collection. What about the smaller poem appeals to you?
Thank you, Andrea. I feel like a lot can be said in few words. I’m also interested in leaving room for the reader. As a reader, I love that feeling when a poem or flash piece leaves me tinkering with interpretation, considering the possibilities of what happened on the page and how space and brevity offer room to play in response. As a writer, I enjoy the challenge of being sparse in words but grand in image.
  
What was the publication process like with this book?
I knew I wanted to work with Katerina Stoykova-Klemener, the editor at Accents Publishing in Lexington, Kentucky. Katerina has an amazing eye for detail and is meticulous in going over every word and every piece of punctuation. I was thrilled when Accents accepted my manuscript and they continue to be such a joy to work with. We spent quality time discussing the final shape of the manuscript throughout the editing process and then the production fell into place without a hitch. From cover design to layout, from bound copy to media relations, the people at Accents are hands-on and truly care about their authors and the success of their books. It’s been a wonderful experience.
 
andrea mcguigan
 
Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in electric city and diamond city.
Send your literary news to: amcguigan@timesshamrock.com

Bookmarks: Jan. 30 2014

Bookmarks: Jan. 30 2014


Above: poem by Clementine Von Radics, a Seattle-based slam poet expected to visit The 570 in March.
 

Book columnist Andrea McGuigan talks with Katie Wisnosky in advance of the Breaking Ground Poets poetry slam on Saturday, Feb. 1 from 2 to 5 p.m. at TwentyFiveEight Studios off North Washington Avenue in Scranton.

 
Please tell us all about the group you coach, the Breaking Ground Poets.
The Breaking Ground Poets is a volunteer run community organization that provides safe spaces for teenagers (ages 14-19) to express themselves through writing and develop their voices as artists. Our mentors have backgrounds in education and the arts. Overall, we aim to promote creative writing, public speaking, emotional literacy and civic engagement within the youth writing communities of NEPA. The Breaking Ground Poets believe through storytelling and positive reinforcement we can build a stronger generation of readers, writers and thinkers. Most importantly, the teens are like family to me.
 
You host monthly open mic nights at the Tioga Bistro in Tunkhannock, but you also hold slam poetry competitions. What can you tell us about the slam that’s taking place on Saturday, Feb. 1? What can people expect to see and hear?
Slam was invented in Chicago, in the ‘80s, by a construction worker named Marc Smith who was tired of going to boring poetry readings where the audience wasn’t engaged in the performance. Slam was a way of giving poetry back to the people and creating a conversation between poet & listener. A slam is a competitive poetry competition where a panel of five judges score teens’ original poems on a scale of 1-10 (with decimals). There are three rounds and eliminations after each round. To encourage crowd participation, the judges hold up their scores immediately after the performance so the crowd can boo or cheer the score. Even though a winner is declared at the end, the opportunity for teenagers to express themselves is always greater than the feat of winning or the feeling of victory. This month Conor O’Brien will be our featured emcee, and we have poets from five schools across NEPA competing. Poems are often deeply personal, raw, dynamic, beautiful and honest!
 

Some of these events are fundraisers for the BGP. I understand the group is saving up to attend the Brave New Voices competition. What happens at BNV and when and where is it happening this year?
Brave New Voices is the largest youth slam festival in the world. It is a four day festival about learning from each other about how to create mutual respect across cultures. 50 teams of youth poets come from all across the United States. BNV also features International teams from Canada, Africa, Guam, and Leeds. At the festival teens participate in forums, workshops, and slams. Last year we traveled to Chicago for the festival, but this year it is in Philly!
 

Breaking Ground Poets will welcome Jeanann Verlee to The 570 in May.

Breaking Ground Poets will welcome Jeanann Verlee to The 570 in May.


 
What other sort of activities does BGP participate in?
Our organization hosts free monthly writing workshops for local youth, open mics, pre-teen workshops facilitated by members of the BGP, next month we are the featured performers for the open mic in Wilkes-Barre, and occasionally we bring some super-fly poets to the area. Clementine Von Radics will be here in March and Jeanann Verlee will be performing in May.
 
How do you think poetry and spoken word performance helps the students you work with?
I have always believed that genuine investment in a student’s future begins the moment an individual is convinced she possesses a sense of empowerment. When you enter into honest conversations with students that promote student-centered thought, it breaks down barriers in the classroom and in their personal lives. Writing provides teenagers with a coping mechanism and makes them feel comfortable exercising their right to be heard in a mature way. Many times we talk at teenagers instead of with them. This creates passive learning. Overall, poetry has taught my students tolerance of one another and how to navigate through their identities in a positive way.
 

Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in ec and dc.
Send your literary news to: amcguigan@timesshamrock.com.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

by Andrea McGuigan
 
New York writer Ross Klavan may be best known as the screenwriter of the 2000 film Tigerland, starring a young Irish upstart named Colin Farell. The work garnered an Independent Spirit Award nomination, and Klavan has been working hard (before and since) in film, television, radio, print and performance. His latest novel, Schmuck, from Greenpoint Press, takes the reader to 1960s New York City, where radio personalities John Elkin and Ted Fox are Kings of the Airwaves. Enter the girl, Sari Rosenbloom, who turns the world upside-down with her mysterious beauty. Everyone falls for her — Elkin and his son Jake, Fox, and every other man in the boroughs who plays host to a pulse and a working set of eyeballs. Too bad for the boys, Sari’s father is one Max Rosenbloom, a gangster specializing in “salvage” who can make more than textile factories disappear overnight. Set against the backdrop of the Viet Nam era in New York, the book captures the longings of both Elkin, a frustrated radio host who longs to be more than just funny voices, and his son, Jake, an angry young beatnik making his way through one of our nation’s most confusing, violent eras. Told with ribald, laugh-out-loud, seriously dark humor and well-crafted grace, Schmuck touches readers with dashes of J.D. Salinger, Elmore Leonard, Carl Hiassen, and Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
 
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First, discuss the title choice and meaning of the word “schmuck.” I always knew it to mean a sort of an unintentional idiot, but there are further connotations. You use the word throughout the book as almost poetic device, it’s repeated so often.
There literally are further connotations, yes. And you can be an intentional idiot, too (laughs). But the word is a derivative of the German which means “jewel,” and I think it refers to the same word we would use when we use the term “family jewels,” as in calling someone a prick. In Yiddish it takes on all sort of permeations and has a resonance to it. The utilization of Yiddish and Yiddish phrases by the generations who were born in America and (are) largely unreligious, is fascinating because it’s like they’re pieces of shrapnel from the language grenade that went off and became imbedded in the patois.
 
Why did you decide to write this as a novel rather than a screenplay? How do the two writing processes differ?
Many screenplays come to me first as a novel. Tigerland was written in its first draft as a novel, and then I wrote the screenplay after that. I love the screenplay form. I very consciously attempted to use screenplay structure in this novel so that it moves fast and funny without long periods of side story. It doesn’t go off the beaten track, and film is like that, tight.
 
How long did the project take to complete? Has this been a project that has lived inside of you for a while until it found its voice, or an “AHA” moment in which you just knew what you were going to do?
The actual writing took two years and I had been fooling around with the story for a while and didn’t even know. I don’t know how it happened but I woke up one morning, rushed in and grabbed a pencil and pad, and as I wrote, I went into my computer and found I had this completely escaped vision. I found notes and false starts going back ten years. I didn’t remember taking half of them.
 
There are certainly some autobiographical elements to the novel. The father in radio and show business, which is true to your life, the New York backdrop, the military background. I’m not going to ask, “Is it about you?” because every author has their philosophy on autobiography. What I’ll ask instead is, “What is your answer for when people ask ‘is this about you?’”
It’s almost impossible to answer. I utilize some of my experience in a fictional manner. I utilize some of my father’s experience, as he was a radio comedian, part of a team throughout the ‘50s and ‘60s. I think you only have yourself to write from and it depends on how you’re using that. It also brings up the question of which selves you’re involving in this because the self who writes versus the one who sits down to dinner or hails a cab, say, are different selves, right?
 
Growing up in New York in the ‘60s, a truly interesting time in the city’s history, can you compare and contrast the New York City of that time with the present day?
It’s almost a completely different city. Here and there a memory of that time pops through, but the city was much looser and wilder in those days, as perhaps as the rest of the country was. It was definitely more violent, and heated up by the Viet Nam war and by various movements for racial and sexual equality. It was an incredibly vibrant city. I think a lot of that has calmed down, for better and worse, certainly.
 
Let’s get hypothetical. I’m an avid reader who’d walked into the bookstore and I ask the bookseller for a recommendation on a new novel. She wants to sell me your book. What does she say to me?
She would have to say to this avid reader that this is a throwback to a kind of novel that is at the same time hilarious and deeply meaningful, simultaneously. It talks about the world which existed that Manson came out of, a wilder America, from the days of the three martini lunches, people chasing each other around radio studios, all of it done with not only the comedy but also under the haunting umbrella of World War II, which all of these men carried with them. But I also want this to function as the type of novel that has the feel as if you were in a halfway decent bar in New York and someone told you a great story with that sort of absurdist tragedy to it.
 

Bookmarks appears bi-monthly in ec and dc.
 
Send your literary news to:
amcguigan@timesshamrock.com

Bookmarks: Gifts for Geeks

Bookmarks: Gifts for Geeks

 

Bookmarks

Book columnist Andrea McGuigan gives her top picks of holiday “Gifts for Geeks.”

The Wes Anderson Collection
By Matt Zoller Seitz
Harry N. Abrams, 336 pgs, hardcover
For the film-buff or art collector in your life, this purview of Anderson’s work will astound even the most ardent fans. The author set up the collection to look like a scrapbook of each of Anderson’s films — Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Darjeeling Limited, The Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Moonrise Kingdom — so that each spread tells a story, from set design to fourth-wall perspectives to costume design. People who appreciate Wes Anderson’s singular aesthetic will find hours of enjoyment here.


The Sandman: Overture #1
By Neil Gaiman, Illustrated by J.H. Williams III
Vertigo for DC Comics, 18 pgs, comic book
Did you know that the comic book Sandman was so popular, that in the mid-1990s it actually outsold Batman and Superman? It is also one of a very few graphic novels which ranked on The New York Times Bestseller list. Gaiman ended the series in 1996, but now, the Sandman returns, with a new storyline and talks of a movie in the works. The Sandman: Overture is technically a prequel to the earlier stories, telling the tale of how Sandman came to be captured in Sandman #1. The Sandman, also known as Morpheus or Dream, is one of the seven Endless: Destiny, Death, Delirium, Destruction, Dream, and twins Desire and Despair. Take it from a diehard fan, the new storyline is fantastic, and Williams’s artwork resplendent. Fans of world mythology, poetry, and classic literature would do themselves well to dive into this rich, intellectual comic series.

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Chronicles: Art and Design
By Weta Workshop
Harper Design, 208 pgs, hardcover
This visual dedication to the second of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy is a must-have for earth-bound travelers of Middle Earth. Filled to the brim with art, photography, and commentary, the book follows Bilbo and company through their adventures in vivid, striking detail. Die-hard fan reviews say that even if you found the movie disappointing, this book is worth the buy.

Doctor Who: Essential Guide to 50 Years of Doctor Who
By Justin Richards
Penguin Books (UK), 208 pgs
Released in tandem with the movie-length feature, The Day of the Doctor, this book covers all eleven incarnations of the TARDIS-traveling Time Lord. Light on text but heavy on visuals, the book covers everything from companions to TARDIS tours to the many alien enemies of the Doctor. This is definitely a collection for die-hard fans (those people who can wax poetic about Tom Baker versus David Tennant) rather than newbies into the world of Dr. Who.

Let Me Off at the Top! My Classy Life and Other Musings
By Ron Burgundy
Crown Archtype, 224 pgs, hardcover
The autobiographical event of the decade has happened, ladies and gentlemen: San Diego’s anchorman Ron Burgundy has graced us with his life story. If we are to believe his author’s note, Let Me Off at the Top took a full eight years to write and couldn’t have been done without the oversight and, um, special companionship of Pulitzer-Prize winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. Needless to say, this book is a pretty big deal around here. You should get on it.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

BOOKMARKS

by Andrea McGuigan
 
Writer and actor Eleanor Gwyn-Jones left her beloved England behind to make Scranton her home. In Gwyn-Jones’s new novel, Theatricks, (Omnific Publishing) a young woman named Enna abandons England, and her life in theater, to come to Pennsylvania with a handsome man named Cole. Hmm. Sounds a bit autobiographical, perhaps. I sat down with Eleanor to get the goods:
 
I’m assuming everyone’s going to ask, “Are you Enna?” I know authors have different philosophical approaches to that idea of autobiography in fiction. Some claim it doesn’t matter while others admit that aspects of themselves come through in their characters.
 
Well, it’s autobiographical and it isn’t. My acting background really plays into this in the fact that yes, I took a situation I knew about, going through the Visa process, and doing this transatlantic commute, with a hunky chunky Pennsylvanian, so I knew about that. But there were so many “could have been” avenues that it could have taken, and in the year I was in NEPA and I couldn’t work, it really got my cogs turning as to how differently this journey could have gone and sort of played out different aspects. Now, did I have a theater? No. Was I having this (uh, spoiler alert!) kind of affair with this other actor? Absolutely not. But there were seeds of ideas that had come from other things. So, is it autobiographical? No. But I can’t write about astrophysics. I can’t write about, you know, fracking, but I can write about theater, and I can write about the Visa process. So, I took those nuggets of what I knew and I took this heroine who isn’t me, but there are facets — she likes cheese and wine, that’s me — but she makes different choices. And I think that was nice for me, very cathartic, to think where I could have been had I taken a different path on my journey.
 

Theatricks author Eleanor Gwyn-Jones

Okay, so if you were going to put your book on a display in a store, what other authors would you place next to Theatricks? Like, if the Amazon “If you like this, try this” algorithm came alive, who would it recommend?
 
Well, Jennifer Weiner, definitely. I would say Emily Giffin, in the sort of love triangle, gritty, no-frills infidelity kind of way. And not that there’s anything wrong with it, but there’s a big difference between chick lit and women’s fiction. When you read someone like Jodi Picoult, she writes about rape, murder, abuse, heart transplants, really gritty subjects, but she does so in a really interesting way. She uses symbolism, leitmotif, folklore, and I appreciate the way she layers her writing. It’s so rich. I hope that in Theatricks I can do the same. I have made use of leitmotif and literary devices that make it more substantial than just a transatlantic love triangle. So it does sort of straddle genres. I didn’t know, when I first sent off Theatricks, if that would go over. It’s so hard to make something that’s commercial and sells while still having that great prosaic nature. I hope that I’ve been able to do that and that readers will continue to read on through Enna’s journey.
 
POSH at the Scranton Club Washington Avenue in Scranton hosts Eleanor’s book launch Thursday, Dec. 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. Books will be available for sale.
 

Excerpt from Theatricks

Chapter 1
He flicks open the lid of the small velvet box with an endearing schoolboy fumble. And there it is, gleaming like the spires of Ox, the whole of Emerald City encapsulated in three carats that wink at me from one brilliant crystallized compound.
“Well?”
The small word, filled with hope, balloons within my ears. I scrape my eyes from the glistening green gem to the earnest face looking up into mine. I glance around self-consciously- one hundred pairs of eyes heavy on me- diners suspended with forked mouthfuls hovering, jaws open and waiting. And the noise seems to disappear almost instantly: all the clattering of cutlery on crockery, chair legs dragging on wood, ice cubes jiggling against glass, is sucked up into a silent vortex, a swirling tornado orbiting our table. The room revolves too, spinning on its axis. I think I am about to be sick.
I know that acid churning; I should be well used to it: the routine rebellion of my body, the gastric mutiny before setting foot on stage, enduring those tortuous moments when I realize, “Shit! I’ve forgotten my lines!”
I look to the audience of diners now, panic simmering in my stomach.
And he’s waiting.
Shouldn’t I reply with something momentous, poetic, Shakespearian perhaps? Shouldn’t I regurgitate something other than my rosemary encrusted lamb chops and pomme puree? Something that I can tell our children? Something witty I can put on Facebook?
It’s not as if I haven’t rehearsed this moment: the knight on bended knee, pledging his love for all to see, proffering a great sparkler that will be the envy of all one’s colleagues and childhood rivals which, not betrothed, one will flaunt with unnecessary hand-waving and finger-flashing, all with one’s now ambidextrous left. This fairy tale is exactly how I imagined it. Maybe lacking slightly in backdrop, as we huddle into our narrow table, the bustle of the busy restaurant brushing uncomfortably close and – okay, it’s not the beach tiki bar on some white-sand, sun-kissed tropical paradise, where we stretch out bronzed limbs and sip pina coladas whilst watching the pink sun sink into the Carribbean Sea. It’s London. It’s raining. What’s new?
But all the same. This is the man I imagined my life with: the only man who ever challenged me to be a kinder person, to be more savvy in business, to be a more confident lover, because he already was. He could, and would do anything he set his mind to, and if that isn’t an aphrodisiac, I don’t know what is.
 
Visit the author online at www.eleanorgwyn-jones.com or on twitter @eleanorgj. Theatricks is also available via Amazon.com.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

by Andrea McGuigan

 

When I encounter a person who says that they don’t like poetry, I always ask “Why?” because I genuinely want to understand. A common response is, “Because I don’t understand it.”
What I try to do with my poetic thrust, and what I would most like to impart onto the non-poetic world, is that there is a type of poetry out there for everyone, in the same way that there is a type of music for everyone, also (Really. Want a poetry recommendation? Email me and I’ll try my best).
The key is to read enough of it, and, I would add, in a non-academic environment, to find what you appreciate. If you’re not inclined to go digging around online at say, www.poetryfoundation.org or www.poetry.com, you could simply ride the bus in Luzerne County.
For the seventh year running, Wilkes Associate English Professor Mischelle Anthony has curated a Poetry in Transit collection for the Luzerne County Transportation Authority, meaning that while you’re riding on public transportation, you can look up from your seat and read a locally-written poem accompanied by original photography. The poems all clock in at six lines or less, and this year’s theme is travel. The poems will go up shortly and stay on the busses for the next year.
The “Travel in Verse” collection includes pieces from Zoe Yonkoski of Dallas, Bruno Milo of Scranton, Anne A. Thomas of Plains,  The Rev. Anthony Grasso of King’s College, Dawn Leas of Dallas, Barbara Crooker of Fogelsville, Joshua Elmore of Shickshinny, Richard Aston of Wilkes-Barre, Francisco Tutella of Wilkes-Barre, Jessica Kuc of Kunkletown and Craig Czury of Reading. The placards also feature original photography by Mark Golaszewski.
The project is inspired by the Poetry in Motion project as seen on New York City’s transit system as well as a London, England program, Poems on the Underground. The idea is to bring art to the masses in an accessible, community-minded medium where poetry isn’t a puzzle on a page, but a contemplative moment in your day. These short poems give you reason to pause from the hectic, monotonous scramblings of everyday life and find beauty, even for a moment.
I’ll share with you one of my favorite poems about poetry, “Introduction to Poetry” by Billy Collins, not because it’s theme is travel, like the Luzerne County Poetry in Transit, but because it’s about learning to appreciate — and not dissect — verse. I share it in all of my workshops and residencies, and it always gets a laugh. Take a moment from your crazy day to read it, and come away feeling a bit more connected to the world.

Introduction to Poetry
by Billy Collins

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem’s room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author’s name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confessing out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.

Bookmarks


Jennifer Diskin reads poetry at the Schimelfenig Pavilion at Nay Aug Park in July 2007. Photo by Alicia Grega.

Bookmarks

 
When the world lost Jennifer Diskin in 2011, it lost more than a talented poet. We lost an advocate, a friend and an incredibly necessary voice. Jennifer, at 38 years old, was part of the foundation upon which poetry was built, because poetry doesn’t just need writers, it also needs an audience, a cheerleader and people who believe in it. Jennifer did all of these things, passionately and well, all while struggling with the Hodgkin’s Lymphoma that would eventually silence her, and entirely too soon.
 
After graduating Bishop Hannan, Jennifer went on to study English and graduate cum laude from Marywood University. She also earned her Master of Arts in Creative Writing from Wilkes University, a program in which she thrived and blossomed, and it’s with this in mind that her parents, Edward and Anita, started the Jennifer Diskin ‘M06 Memorial Scholarship. The award helps fund students in the Wilkes University MA/MFA Creative Writing Program. Jennifer had always shown support for her fellow writers, and this award reminds us that she and her family can continue to do so.
 
The Diskins and friends will host a memorial benefit to help fund the scholarship Sunday at Sidel’s Restaurant & Lounge in Scranton. I talked with Jennifer’s father on the phone about Jennifer and the upcoming event.
 
“Mike Puskas, from Retro Rocket and Village Idiots, will be performing music with Mike Chafin and Jaime Novak. Mike is really excited by this event, that it helps poetry and artists, and there will be poetry readings between music sets. Depending on how many people we get, we may set up an open mic.”
 
“Rich, the owner of Sidel’s, decided not to charge an admission fee, to help bring in more people. So we’ll raise money through raffle baskets, 50/50 tickets and general donations. Everyone has been so supportive, especially the Wilkes community. They granted her a posthumous Master of Fine Arts in May of 2012, and held a benefit for the scholarship fund last January, around the time of Jennifer’s birthday.”
 
Jennifer has two previous chapbooks of poetry, Everyday Anemias and Wear White and Grieve, from Naissance Chapbooks. However, Mr. Diskin informed me that there are still 75-80 unpublished poems of Jennifer’s and that they are seeking a publisher at the moment. When the new book is available, another event will be held, with all the proceeds going to the scholarship fund.
 
“We’ve had a lot of help with Jennifer’s work. Poets Carla Reck, Richard Ashton, Constance Denchy, and Dawn Leas have all helped go through Jen’s work and type it up into a manuscript. Her caregiver, Nancy Sullenberger, has been very helpful, also.”
 
The Diskins plan to hold these benefits annually to keep the scholarship funded. “We do this because we’re keeping her name and spirit alive. It benefits poets and writers and their education, and that’s so important. It also keeps us close to Jennifer. It’s what we have left,” Mr. Diskin said.
 
Sidel’s is located at 1202 N. Main Ave., Scranton. The event, this Sunday, Nov. 10, runs from 6 to 10 p.m. For more information, visit the event listing on Facebook at facebook.com/events/590592964321320.

 

Andrea McGuigan is a poet, artist-in-residence, co-host of Prose in Pubs, and general Scrantonian bibliophile.

email book review material, or information about literary events to mcguigan.andrea@gmail.com.

Bookmarks

Andrea McGuigan speaks with poet and instructor Brian Fanelli about the release of his new poetry collection All that Remains available via online retailers, locally at Barnes & Noble and from the publisher at www.unboundcontent.com.

How long have you been working on the material of this book?
I started working on the poems in this collection back in 2009 and 2010 when I was still a student completing my M.F.A. at Wilkes. I had poems that did not end up in Front Man, the manuscript and published chapbook that I completed while at Wilkes. Ultimately, some of those poems ended up in All That Remains. Other poems in the book were completed in 2011, and a few were added to the manuscript in 2012, after the book was accepted for publication. I’m grateful that Unbound Content, the publisher, allowed me to add a few more poems and make revisions as late as a few months ago. They were really wonderful to work with and open to changes.

Is there a narrative thread that sews the poems together, or does each piece stand alone and do its own work?
This collection doesn’t have a single narrative thread like Front Man did. Some of the poems explore what happens when relationships unravel, and some of the others poems have a working-class undertone, but there is not narrative thread. A majority of the poems were published in various magazines and literary journals before collected in this manuscript, so, for the most part, I would say they stand alone and do their own work.

Tell me about your writing process. What’s a day in Brian Fanelli’s writing space look like?
Most of my writing is done in the morning because that’s when I have the time to write. My afternoons are filled with teaching, and two nights out of the week I drive up to SUNY Binghamton for classes towards my doctorate. I get the writing done when I can, and more often than not, it’s in the early morning, before I have to go to work. I also save a lot of time on the weekends for writing and reading, and I think it’s important to make the time for writing whenever you can, no matter how hectic your day-to-day schedule is. I suppose that’s one of my favorite aspects of poetry — a few lines can be written on breaks, during those short silences. William Carlos Williams used to write lines of poetry on prescription paper when he worked as a doctor in New Jersey. He squeezed in writing during whatever free time he had, even during his busy work days.

Tell me about your influences. Do you think astute readers will be able to track these influences?
My influences are broad. William Carlos Williams is a major influence on my work, especially for the way he wrote about the every day person in his poetry and the way he used every day, colloquial speech. I also enjoy poets who use the rhythms of music in their work, particularly William Matthews and the way he used jazz rhythms to build his lines, or crafted beautiful elegies to jazz musicians. Langston Hughes is one of my favorites too, and I find myself returning to him again and again lately, not only for the way he incorporated blues and jazz in his work, but also the way he used the music as an act of protest against racial oppression, or to show how music can be an escape from hardship. I also like his depictions of Harlem and how, like Williams, he used the speech of his neighborhood in his poetry. As far as contemporary poets, I really like Terrance Hayes, Major Jackson, David Wojahn, John Murillo, and several others. Contemporary American poetry is so expansive right now, and so many exciting things are happening. There are so many different strains and movements or extensions of movements at work. I could go on and on!

Tell me the technical aspects of this collection: can readers expect experimentation, from poems, etc?
There are a few loose sonnets in the book, very short, compressed poems. Most of the poems are lyric and narrative, though. They employ an “I” speaker.

Lastly, give me all the details about your book launch.
My book launch will be Friday, Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. at the Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. I will have books for sale, and I’ll be happy to sign them. I will be doing several readings locally, including at the Hoyt Library on Monday, Nov. 18 at 6:30 p.m., and several readings out of the area over the next few months into 2014. All of my readings can be found on my website,www.brianfanelli.com.

Bookmarks: Norman Mailer, A Double Life

Bookmarks: Norman Mailer, A Double Life

Norman Mailer: A Double Life was released on Tuesday, Oct. 15. Andrea McGuigan speaks with biographer, J. Michael Lennon.

The scope of this project was enormous. How much material of Mailer’s did you wade through and how long did the entire project take, from beginning the writing to handing it in to an editor?
Mailer’s archive consists of 500 cubic feet of paper. My wife and I did a rough catalogue over several years in the 1990s. So I handled all of it, and read a lot. From 2002 to 2006 I read his letters carefully, all 45,000 of them (about 25 million words), to prepare a selected edition of them. Then in late 2006, I was appointed his authorized biographer, and shelved the letters project. From that point on, I researched and wrote, drawing extensively on the letters and about 200 interviews with his family and friends and editors. The writing took seven years, but there were several years of work preceding the composition.

You were writing about a friend and colleague, which must have been challenging. What can you say you struggled with in the writing of this biography? Conversely, what came easier to you than you may have expected?
The big struggle in any serious writing project is maintaining focus. You often feel stupid and lost, and have to write your way out of a hole. It is a daily chore, and I wrote almost every day, eight hours a day. I averaged about 320 days a year. Jettisoning my academic way of writing, which is determinedly conscious of sources, attributions, and whatever the critical current you are used to swimming in, was a hurdle, but not as high as I had thought. All writers have to adjust their styles and methods to the project at hand. Knowing Norman was much more of an asset than a liability, and he told me to put everything in, reveal the lacks and gaps in his character, as well as his considerable personal and artistic virtues. Another problem was how to handle myself as a character in the last third of the bio. Finally, I just described myself in the third person as Mike Lennon, a literature professor.

Can you provide us with a personal anecdote about your time with Mailer?
When asked by a Vanity Fair interviewer to name his favorite possession, Mailer answered that he was too superstitious to name it. This piqued my curiosity and a couple of years later I asked him to reveal it. He told me that he gave that answer because he could not think of one object that he really prized. He was the one of the most un-materialistic persons I have ever met, careless about clothes, cars, furniture, and impossible to buy a Christmas present for. One year I gave him a replica of the Combat Infantryman Badge, which he was awarded for his service as a rifleman in the Pacific in WWII. He had lost the original and seemed really pleased to have it. But maybe he was just being nice.

If you could advise those readers uninitiated in Mailer’s work, which piece of his writing would you suggest as a starting-off point?
The Executioner’s Song. It is not the most characteristic, but it is his most readable, fast-paced narrative. If you want to read the book in which he invented his characteristic style, try Advertisements for Myself. It is a collection of essays, stories, poems and dramatic fragments held together by italicized “Advertisements,” which are reflections on his life. They are written in a self-conscious, edgy, angry, funny style. It may turn out to be his most influential book.

What do you think Norman would say after reading this book? What would you want him to say? I imagine they may be two different things.
Yes, indeed, they would be different. He would surprise me, I think, finding faults I was unaware of, and some merits I missed. He was an unpredictable character, and once told his sister that he often didn’t know what he would do before he did it. Someone said, “Calculation never made a hero,” and God knows Mailer was not calculating. It is part of what makes him such an interesting figure.
Norman Mailer: Double Life by J. Michael Lennon. Simon and Schuster, October 15. 960 pgs.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Poetry in the
Lackawanna Valley

 

Poetry thrives in the Lackawanna Valley. In the past year, our area has hosted Jon Sands, Lauren Zuniga, Jeanann Verlee, Anis Mojgani, and Andrea Gibson. On October 19, at 2pm at TwentyFiveEight Studios in Scranton, award-winning performance poet Buddy Wakefield joins that stellar lineup. Why should you get your ticket now? First, because tickets won’t be sold at the door (go here: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/417951) Second, here’s a bulleted list of reasons why:

  • Because Wakefield is a three time WORLD champion slam poet, meaning that he has, not just once, but three times, performed against champions from all over the globe. And won.
  • Because he’s been featured on NPR, BBC, HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, and can now be found on Ani DiFranco’s independent music label, Righteous Babe Records. The first time I saw Wakefield read was at an Ani DiFranco show at the Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre. She brought him out between songs to perform one of his most well-known pieces, “Horsehead,” and my friends and I couldn’t speak afterwards. We had never heard anything like him.
  • Because watching Buddy perform is like watching a spring sproing into action, from potential to fiercely kinetic energy. His whole body acts like a conduit for powerful language, electrifying each word until you think the whole room might get struck by lightning.
  • Because Buddy inserts humor into the sublime and painful like almost no one else I’ve ever heard.
  • Because he raises chickens, and released a book for other chicken-keepers. It’s designed to look like a magazine and is entitled “Henhouse,” and features centerfolds of particularly attractive chickens. Really.
  • Because The Breaking Ground Poets from Tunkhannock are responsible for bringing him here. This group of writers and performers is mostly made up of teenage students and their fearless leader, Katie Wisnosky. They bring these performers here to help enhance the appreciation of poetry and culture in our area, and they do this on a volunteer basis.
  • Because he’s performed all over the darn world and this is his first time in Scranton.
  • Because:

“Ya know,
I don’t care to be good, Sheriff.
I care to be whole.
So read what it says in my buckles, boy:
Take your sunset out of my rise.
I will not send you sailing if you came here to drive,
and I know you came here to drive.
That’s why it reads Don’t Give Up on your saddle,
like I wrote Won’t Give Up on my life,
like I’ve been typing my name
on a horse I drove
through the desert as sure as a river he ran,
and I swear on my shadow he wouldn’t turn back
no matter how much slack I typed into his neck.
Not everyone wants to go home
to get the sunset painted back into their bones,
to have the law with all that slack in its love
pretending to save me.
You don’t need to save me.
I already did that myself
when your God as my witness
never turned up.
There was a typewriter
buried alive in that horse,
the one I rode to get out of the flood.”
(from “Horsehead,” Write Bloody Publishing, 2011, 2012)

Andrea McGuigan is a poet, artist-in-residence, co-host of Prose in Pubs, and general Scrantonian bibliophile.

email book review material, or information about literary events to mcguigan.andrea@gmail.com.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

by Andrea McGuigan

 

Non-Fiction for Fall

 

The Men Who United the States
by Simon Winchester
Harper, Oct. 15 (496 pages)
Winchester, the force behind such bestsellers as The Professor and the Madman and Atlantic returns with a series of mini-biographies.  The author turns his artist’s eye to the men who could be considered the architects of our collected republic.  Portraits of explorers, of the men who mapped our highway system, of the men who built the telegraph, of the doctors and scientists and radical thinkers, all come together to paint a bigger picture of a supposedly united America. Winchester ponders the big picture by asking if these efforts have succeeded in making the nation “indivisible (never mind the liberty and justice for all).”

Johnny Cash: The Life by Robert Hilburn
Little, Brown and Company, Oct. 29 (688 pages)
Los Angeles Times music critic Robert Hilburn knows a thing or two about Johnny Cash.  Not only did he interview Cash at Folsom Prison (indeed, Hilburn was the only music journalist present for the famous 1968 performance), but he also extensively interviewed Cash just before his death in 2003.  Hilburn believes that people don’t just listen to Johnny Cash  — they believe in him. But, Hilburn may ask, what are they believing in? Cash was, by turns, liberal and conservative, righteous and fallen, and, according to this biography, plagued by many more personal demons than the public has previously thought, by way of books and films. That the book has garnered approval and praise from the likes of Keith Richards, Kris Kristofferson, Patti Smith, and even Roseanne Cash, Johnny’s daughter, speaks to its value.

Servants: A Downstairs History of Britain from the Nineteenth Century to Modern Times by Lucy Lethbridge
W.W. Norton and Company, Nov. 19  (400 pages)
The popularity of British television shows Upstairs, Downstairs and of course, Downton Abbey, has made the life of the Edwardian British servant seem utterly romantic.  Lethbridge offers up a more sincere account of the serving class by displaying a more complex, realistic account of servitude in England.  For starters, she uses journals, letters, and personal papers from actual servants.  She also adds to the complexity by writing about service folk from every type of household: from the typical estate mansion with its bustling staff of footmen and drivers to the maid-of-all-trades who worked tirelessly in the middle-class households.

Norman Mailer: Double Life
by J. Michael Lennon
Simon and Schuster, Oct. 15 (960 pages)
Only 1,000-page tome could begin to tell the intricate and complex story of a man as intricate and complex as literary giant Norman Mailer. Author J. Michael Lennon stands as possibly the only writer who could wrangle Mailer’s life to the page: Lennon boasts a 35-year friendship with Mailer; has edited and written several books with Mailer; holds the position of Chair of the Editorial Board of The Mailer Review; had access to vast amounts of Mailer’s correspondences and unpublished works; talked with all of Mailer’s (five) ex-wives, his widow Norris Church Mailer, and each of Mailer’s nine children; interviewed dozens of people who knew the author, and the list goes on. Lennon’s extensive research pays off in an intelligent, no-punches-pulled, dynamic account of the man, the myth, and machismo-made-manifest that was Norman Mailer, a man who Woody Allen once joked should “donate his ego to Harvard Medical School.”  Lennon has achieved something rare and true with this epic biography, and critics will be talking about it for years to come.

Andrea McGuigan is a poet, artist-in-residence, co-host of Prose in Pubs, and general Scrantonian bibliophile. Email book review material, or information about literary events to mcguigan.andrea@gmail.com.