Fab 5 – May 3, 2018

Fab 5 – May 3, 2018

1. ‘Star Wars’ Night

Feel the force during “Star Wars” Night on Friday, May 4, as the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders take on Pawtucket Red Sox at PNC Field, 235 Montage Mountain Road, Moosic.
Gates open at 5:30 p.m., and the first pitch is set for 6:35.
Fans are encouraged to wear costumes, and characters from Lucasfilm’s iconic series will be on hand for photos. The first 2,500 fans will receive a Chance Adams bobblehead. A pre-game “Junior Jedi” parade also will take place.
The RailRiders will don special “Star Wars”-themed uniforms for the game and auction off the jerseys that night with all proceeds benefiting Geisinger Children’s Miracle Network.
For tickets or information, visit swbrailriders.com.

2. NEPA Green Fair & 5K for Clean Air

Promote environmental protection, public health and sustainability in the region Saturday, May 5, during the inaugural NEPA Green Fair & 5K Run/Walk for Clean Air.
The free, family-friendly event takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Blakely Borough Recreation Complex, 100 Keystone Ave.Peckville. It features live music, local food, raffle baskets, exhibitors, more than 40 eco-friendly vendors, yoga workshops, educational programs, art and more.
The 5K run/walk begins at 9 a.m. along the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail. To register in advance as an individual or part of a team, visit racemenu.com/nepa. Registration opens at 8 a.m. Guests also are encouraged to bring used sneakers to recycle and used clothing and books to swap or donate. For more information, visit nepagreenfair.org.

3. Taste of Fringe

The Scranton Fringe Festival will raise money for its programming with a special night of food, drink and live entertainment.
Taste of Fringe will take place Thursday, May 3, at 6 p.m. at POSH at the Scranton Club, 404 N. Washington Ave. Tickets cost $35 and are available at eventbrite.com/e/taste-of-fringe-tickets-44613518234.
The event is open to all ages, but guests must be 21 or older with a valid photo ID to drink or buy alcohol. For details, email info@scrantonfringe.org or visit the event’s Facebook page.The annual Scranton Fringe Festival will run Saturday, Sept. 22, through Sunday, Sept. 30, at various venues in the city.

4. Derby Bae Mayo

Celebrate two seasonal favorites in one night on Saturday, May 5.
Derby Bae Mayo at Jack’s Draft House, 802 Prescott Ave., Scranton, combines the Kentucky Derby and Cinco de Mayo into one giant dance party with DJ duo SaturBae. The DJs plan to play a lot of pop hits and dance anthems from the late ’90s and early 2000s.
The night starts at 9; there is no cover charge. For information, visit the Facebook event page.

5. Free Comic Book Day

Celebrate Free Comic Book Day with giveaways, activities and more at Comics on the Green, 307 N. Washington Ave., Scranton.
The comic book shop will join numerous other comic book stores around the country in celebrating the event on Saturday, May 5, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
In addition to offering free books whose subjects range from “Avengers” and “Doctor Who” to Disney princesses and “Riverdale,” the store will offer sales, free face painting and pictures with “Star Wars” characters, including a stormtrooper. DC Comics artist Tom Derenick also will sign books and do sketches.
For more information, visit the Facebook event page. To view all the titles being offered for free this year and find more participating shops, go to freecomicbookday.com.

Illusionist Criss Angel has magic eye on NEPA

Illusionist Criss Angel has magic eye on NEPA

Criss Angel knew he wanted to pursue magic at 6, when his aunt Stella showed him a card trick.
“I was enamored with magic,” said the illusionist, whose real name is Christopher Sarantakos. “She was kind enough to share the secret, and then I drove everyone crazy performing it over and over again. I was very engaged by magic. I was just somebody that could not stop thinking about magic. … I started performing and getting paid at 12 years old.”
Angel — who soared to fame when his hit television series, “Mindfreak,” aired on A&E from 2005 to 2010 — brings his popular stage show, “RAW — The Mindfreak Unplugged” to F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts on Wednesday, May 2.
Angel’s TV show is syndicated in more than 90 countries, and his Las Vegas stage shows, “Criss Angel BeLIEve” and “Criss Angel Mind-freak Live” — both in partnership with Cirque du Soleil — have been lauded by various critics as the “biggest name in Las Vegas magic.”
This touring show is unlike his residency in Las Vegas, however, Angel said, describing it as a stripped-down version that brings his street magic, mentalism and some of his most iconic illusions to life in an intimate, raw setting.
“This RAW tour has really given me an opportunity to do something I’ve never done in Vegas,” Angel said. “I get to do that close-up magic that I’ve done very successfully on television but never performed live. It’s an unplugged version of ‘Mindfreak.’ Basically, it’s a little bit of everything.”
Though he credits Harry Houdini, Doug Henning and Richiardi Jr. as influences to his style, much of Angel’s inspiration comes from popular culture, art and the people closest to him.
“My dad was the greatest influence to me,” Angel added. “He taught me the power of the mind and how, when it works together with the … soul, anything is possible.”
In Las Vegas, Angel has a 60,000-square-foot “laboratory” where he and his team work to develop new material and experiences. Some of these stunts and illusions take a few months to perfect; others take several years.
Angel has been recognized for his illusions through the years, receiving multiple Magician of the Year awards from the International Magician Society and, in July, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Although some might know Angel for his stunts, such as his water torture cell in Time Square or freeing himself from a straitjacket while hanging upside down, audiences can expect much more than just wild tricks from his Kirby Center show. Angel said a few moments frighten people, and others might bring them to tears.
“It’s really a piece of art that people really connect to,” Angel said. “I try to take people on an emotional rollercoaster ride and let them connect and engage and escape their daily lives and see that everything is possible. … The magic of emotions in (RAW) gives people the opportunity to escape reality and see things they’ve never seen before (and) will probably never see again.”

Clubs – April 26, 2018

Clubs – April 26, 2018

Thursday, April 26
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Line dancing with Chris and Darlene
Bart & Urby’s, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Trivia Night
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Open Mic with Big Al and Billy Edwards
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Karaoke with Edwin
The Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scranton: Zodiac Boogie
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam
Chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Kartune
Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N. Washington Ave., Scranton: EJ the DJ
Crotti’s On Ash, 1431 Ash St., Scranton: Bryan Banks and Jessica Cruise Duo
Gin’s Tavern, Route 107, Factoryville: Dashboard Mary
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Bingo Night
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Know Limit Trivia
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Karaoke
Levels Bar & Grill, 519 Linden St., Scranton: DJ NRG
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: NFL Draft Party
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Asialena
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Lab — Comedy Showcase
World of Brew Bar & Bottle Shop, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Open Call hosted by Jami Kali

Friday, April 27
Ali Baba Liquor Lounge, 219 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Jay Critch, Jay Critch
American Legion Post 665, 901 Main St., Dickson City: Marilyn Kennedy
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Mike Barrasse
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Karaoke
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: No Memories — Weezer tribute
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: The Mix
The Beaumont Inn, 4437 Route 309, Dallas: Neil Nicastro
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Gone Crazy
Blu Wasabi, 223 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit: Bill Arnold Band
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Flirtin’ With Yesterday
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Dustin Switzer Duo
Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N. Washington Ave., Scranton: Doug Smith’s Dixieland All-Stars
Crotti’s On Ash, 1431 Ash St., Scranton: Clarence Spady
Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: DJ NRG
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Great Rock Pair
Grotto Pizza/Grand Slam Sports Bar, RR 415, Harveys Lake: Hagan and Company
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Empire in Decline
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Inferno Drag Show
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Bret Alexander Duo
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: The Aegean, The Hands Resist, The University of South Vietnam School of Warfare, Clam Fight. Brain Candle and Vulturepeak
JJ Bridjes Restaurant, 925 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit: Sarafinko Trio
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Jonny D
Molly O’Sheas at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Neil Nicastro Duo
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: J.P. Biondo and Billy Strings
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Luongo Brothers
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Wild Planes, E57 and The Cryptid
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Six Guns Loaded
Wildflowers New York Bistro, 600 Wildflower Drive, Wilkes-Barre: Beth Connor
The Wine Cellar, 815 Mulberry St., Scranton: Jung Bergo
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Buddy Fitzpatrick with Matt Burk and Zachary Pickert

Saturday, April 28
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Vine Street
Arturo’s, 140 Main St., Dupont: The Classics
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Snowblind
Barrett’s Pub, 474 Main St., Archbald: Dashboard Mary
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: 20lb Head
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Doug Drost
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Chatter
Cavanaugh’s Grille, 163 N. Main St., Mountain Top: The Music Room
Hog’s Hollow Saloon, 1459 State Route 93, Berwick: Graces Downfall
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Triple Fret
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Traverse the Abyss, Terrorize This, Symetria, TurnCloak and Invain
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Pat McGlynn Duo
Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Nanticoke: Outta the Blue
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: 7800 Fahrenheit
Skytop Lodge, 1 Skytop Lodge Road, Skytop: Doug Smith Orchestra
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Moodswing
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Grayson Drive and Ron Schoonover
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Buddy Fitzpatrick with Matt Burk and Zachary Pickert

Sunday, April 29
Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N. Washington Ave., Scranton: Jack Bordo and Jim Cullen
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Not Yo Granny’s Bingo
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Irata, Sierra, Earthmouth and E57
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Flatland Ruckus, Karaoke with DJ Huff

Monday, April 30
Duffy’s Coffee House, 306 S. State St., Clarks Summit: Open jam session

Tuesday, May 1
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Dishonest Fiddlers
Sarah Street Grill, 550 Quaker Alley, Stroudsburg: I Am Curbie

Wednesday, May 2
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Karaoke with Tiffany
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Open mic night
Ole Tyme Charley’s Restaurant & Pub, 31 S. River St., Plains Twp.: Karaoke
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Joe Cigan

Fab 5 – April 26, 2018

Fab 5 – April 26, 2018

1. ‘Our Town’

The New Vintage Ensemble and Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple bring one of Thornton Wilder’s classic stories to the stage this weekend.
“Our Town” runs Friday, April 27; Saturday, April 28; and Friday, May 4, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, May 5, at 3 and 8 p.m. in the cultural center’s Shopland Hall, 420 N. Washington Ave. The Pulitzer Prize-winning drama focuses on the residents of Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire, in the early 20th century and looks at everyday life and how they view it.
Directed by Conor Kelly O’Brien, the show stars Maggie O’Brien, Kimmie Leff, Tim McDermott, Sarah Regan, Izzy DeFlice, Chantel Mitchell, Alicia Nordstrom, Dave Spitzer, Casey Thomas, April Holgate, Art Walsh, Will Krisanda and Celine Carter.
Tickets start at $15 and are available at the box office, ticketmaster.com and 800-745-3000.

2. Tricky Tray Fundraiser

Enjoy an afternoon of raffles and prizes while helping a cause during the ninth annual Tricky Tray Fundraiser at the Dock on Wallenpaupack at Silver Birches Resort, 205 Route 507, Hawley. On Sunday, April 29, starting at noon, the event will include raffles of more than 150 themed baskets as well as big-ticket items, such as spa packages and electronics. Guests who bring a new Crayola item to donate to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia will receive a free raffle ticket.The fundraiser will benefit Pennies from Heaven, Caleb’s Foundation, which aims to help parents with the care of sick children. Since May 2010, the foundation has helped more than 580 families with critically ill children.
Admission is free. For more information, email calebspennies18@gmail.com or visit calebspennies.org.

3. Inaugural Scranton Founder’s Day

Learn about Scranton’s past and present at a free event Saturday, April 28.
Leadership Lackawanna Core Program class of 2018 and Lackawanna Heritage Valley will present the inaugural Scranton Founder’s Day from noon to 4 p.m. at the Scranton Half Marathon Pavilion at the Olive Street trail head of Lackawanna River Heritage Trail.
The family-friendly event includes historical re-enactors, games and music. Guests can grab some food from vendors, too. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.

4. Children’s Advocacy Center fundraisers

Join the Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania for a pair of events this week. The child-abuse intervention facility, Scranton, will commemorate its 20th year of service at the seventh annual Cocktails by Moonlight. Set for Thursday, April 26, from 6 to 9 p.m. at POSH at the Scranton Club, 404 N. Washington Ave., the event also will honor Ellen E. Farrell, Toyota of Scranton and retired State Police Cpl. Patrick J. Zirpoli for their child advocacy. The $50 ticket includes music by the Tyler Dempsey Jazz Trio, cocktails and light fare. Reservations are required. To reserve tickets, email jessfarrell@cacnepa.org or visit cacnepa.org. Then, on Saturday, April 28, the center will hold its 14th annual Moonlight Walk/Run at Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Registration begins at 5 p.m. across from the Everhart Museum. Following are a kids’ fun run at 6, a 5K walk at 6:15 and the 5K and 10K runs at 7.
Registration costs $30 for the 5K run and $35 for the 10K run in advance, available at runsignup.com/moonlightrun. Advance registration is not required, but it costs $5 more the day of the event. Proceeds benefit neglected and physically and sexually abused children.
For more information, visit cacnepa.org or call 570-969-7313.

5. Greenhouse and Kitchen Show 

Gather ideas for your home and garden at Waverly Community Houses’s third annual Greenhouse and Kitchen Show
Set for Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Comm, 1115 North Abington Road, Waverly Twp., the event includes a variety of vendors selling flowers, food and items for the garden, kitchen and more. Guests also can pick up homemade baked goods and fresh soups and sandwiches from Iron Pierce.
Admission is a suggested donations is $5, benefiting the Comm. For more information, visit the event page on Facebook.

Evening of Fine Food and Wine unites culture, culinary arts

Evening of Fine Food and Wine unites culture, culinary arts

Take a tour of a historic Scranton landmark and the flavors of Northeast Pennsylvania all in one night.
The annual Evening of Fine Food and Wine returns for an 18th edition on Sunday, April 29, at 5:30 p.m. at Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., in whose unique rooms guests will sample dishes from several local restaurants.
The $100 ticket gains each audience member of sampling of food from such spots as Fire and Ice on Toby Creek, Kingston Twp., and Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, Radisson at Lackawanna Station hotel and Montage Mountain Resorts, all in Scranton. Proceeds benefit the cultural center.
“It’s so important, because this is the most beautiful building in Scranton, and we need to preserve it,” said Elizabeth Murray, event co-chairwoman.
Kenny McGraw will provide music during cocktail hour, and groups then will visit rooms across the cultural center where chefs will serve tasting portions and wine. will speak with the audience about the dishes as they prepare them, and members of local media — including Times-Tribune reporters Gia Mazur and Patrice Wilding and newspaper librarian Brian Fulton — will provide background on the facility’s history.
“It’s great for the community,” Hilton chef Donnie Schmidt said, adding that the event lets the chefs break out of their “everyday routine,” too. “It definitely gives us a different outlook to the day.” 
Schmidt and Radisson chef Chris Chludzinski still were deciding on what dinner entrees to serve as of last week, while Fire and Ice chef Gary Edwards looks to make an oxtail ragu with quail hash. Wines will accompany the dishes, but event co-chairman John Murray guests also can enjoy beer pairings and cocktails that night.
Electric City Roasting Co., meanwhile, will prepare batch brews of hot coffee in addition to having cold-brew coffee on tap as guests try desserts and listen to music from the Wanabees, said Kyle Mervau, the company’s director of products.
While Montage Mountain participated in the event previously, this marks chef Tony Mendicino’s first time cooking for it. He plans to prepare a Bailey’s panacotta with Jameson salted caramel for what he expects to be a large crowd.
“(It’s) definitely going to be a good time, a great benefit,” he said.
The chefs also enjoy the camaraderie with their peers the night provides, Chludzinski noted, and he enjoys seeing familiar faces coming back year after year. Edwards said he enjoys sharing his knowledge with the patrons and connecting the culinary arts with the other arts at the cultural center, “such a wonderful facility.”
“I think they go hand in hand,” he said.
Organizers recommend guests buy tickets in advance. John Murray said they are selling fast, and only a limited amount are available.
“It’s the best event anybody will ever attend,” he said.

 

Show of talent PSU displays range of musical groups, styles with free performance

Show of talent PSU displays range of musical groups, styles with free performance

A free concert will show off Penn State Worthington Scranton’s growing music program and its wide range of musical styles this weekend.
Worthington Scranton Chorale, the Roc[k]tet show choir and Campus Jazz Band all will perform in the college’s annual spring concert Saturday, April 21, at 4 p.m. at the Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton.
Sharon Ann Toman, director of music and assistant teaching professor in music, began holding the spring concerts a few years after she joined the staff in 2000. The groups performed on campus on many years, but as the years went on, the groups grew and so did the audiences for the shows. The campus auditorium can accommodate 200 people, and after the concert reached capacity two years ago, Toman knew they needed a new venue. They shifted to the Theater at North in 2017 and packed that, too, she said.

Toman

Toman has watched the groups grow since she arrived, with the chorus up to 40 members from just a dozen back then. The band, too, started small but has grown to about 20 to 25 members, she added. Some faculty and staff also sing in the chorus and play in band, which Toman called “nice because then faculty and students and staff can interact.”
“All of them have a love for music,” Toman said of her students. “They like to sing; they like to play. … I always say we work hard but we also laugh hard.
“The rehearsals are interesting. They’re light-hearted, and the students have a good time, and I think that’s important. And above everything else, while they’re having a good time, they’re learning.”
In Saturday’s four-part concert, audiences will hear the eight-member mixed show choir perform “How Far I’ll Go” from the Disney cartoon “Moana,” “Stand by Me” and “Forget You.” The chorale, a mixed chorus of about 40 voices, will perform a traditional spiritual, “Peace Like a River”; “Candle on the Water,” from “Pete’s Dragon”; Josh Groban’s “You Raise Me Up” and Billy Joel’s “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me.”
“We do fun stuff. … And of course we always sing the Penn State alma mater,” Toman said.
The 25-piece campus jazz band, meanwhile, will play “everything and anything” from “Smoke on the Water” to the Blues Brothers, Toman said. 
“They play about seven songs, which is enough to show off their talents,” she added.
Under the direction of Deano Noto, Abington Heights Middle School’s eighth-grade chorus also will perform at the concert, continuing a tradition Worthington Scranton began three years ago when it invited a local school group to perform, too. The choir will perform two songs on its own and then join the college performers for a patriotic song.
People sometimes are surprised to hear Worthington Scranton has such a thriving music program, Toman said, “because when you think of music in higher-education places, you really think of Marywood (University) as well as the University of Scranton.” But her students can stand on level with those music students, she insisted.
“The unique spin on this is the fact that none of these students are music majors,” Toman said. “They could be science, they could be English, they could be business. They’re all from different majors. I don’t have music majors on campus. I’m a graduate (of) Marywood, (and my students) can keep up with the people from Marywood and the University of Scranton. I’m very blessed with a lot of talent here on campus.”

Fab 5 – April 19, 2018

Fab 5 – April 19, 2018

1. ‘Auntie Mame’

Actors Circle presents the comedy “Auntie Mame” starting this weekend at Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Road, Scranton.
The play runs from Thursday, April 19, through Sunday, April 29, with shows Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m.
“Auntie Mame” — which predates “Mame,” the musical version of the story — follows the life of eccentric Mame Dennis, who refuses to bow to convention and continues to live her lavish lifestyle as she raises her late brother’s 10-year-old son.
Tickets cost $12 for general admission, $10 for seniors and $8 for students. For reservations call 570-342-9707 or e-mail tickets@actorscircle.com.

2. Pennsylvania Cannabis Festival

The fourth annual Pennsylvania Cannabis Festival returns to Nay Aug Park, 500 Arthur Ave., Scranton, on Sunday, April 22.
The family- and pet-friendly event helps raise awareness for the legalization of cannabis in Pennsylvania. The action kicks off at 8 a.m., and entertainment at the green stage starts at 9. Organizers expect more than 280 vendors, 16 food vendors, 15 musical acts and 12 speakers at the festival.
Admission is free. For more information, visit penncannafest.com or visit the event’s Facebook page.

3. The Mahoney Brothers

Head back to the ’50s and ’60s with the Mahoney Brothers.
The group will perform in “Saturday Night Live with the Oldies” on Saturday, April 21, at Peoples Security Bank Theater at Lackawanna College, 501 Vine St., Scranton. Doors open 6:30 p.m., and the show begins 7.
The Mahoney Brothers’ show includes tributes to Neil Diamond, Willie Nelson, the Beach Boys, Elvis Presley, the Beatles and much more.
Tickets cost $25 for reserved seats, $35 for premium seats and $45 for VIP seats. For more information, call 570-955-1490 or 570-499-4904 or visit lackawanna.edu.

4. Semi-Toned

Enjoy a night of a cappella music with Semi-Toned.
The group of 12 men from the United Kingdom will perform Friday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Theater at North, 1539 N Main Ave., Scranton. Valley View High School’s “Voices of the Valley Choir” will kick off the night.
Semi-Toned has toured the world and earned the title of national champions at the U.K. Voice Festival in April 2015.
Tickets cost $25. For more information, visit thetheateratnorth.org or call 877-987-6487.

5. Keystone College Music and Arts Fair

A free event featuring artists, actors and musicians comes to Keystone College, La Plume, on Sunday, April 22.
Starting at 2 p.m., the Music and Arts Fair will feature performances by local musicians, including the Quietmen, KC Jazz Combo and Primary Colors. The Keystone College Mobile Glass Studio also will demonstrate glassblowing and sell its work.
At 5 p.m., the main concert will take place in the college’s Theatre in Brooks. It will feature poetry readings, Vocal Accord Barbershop Quartet, a Keystone Players theater performance, Lackawanna Trail High School Vocal Music Ensemble and more.
Food will be available for purchase. For more information, visit keystone.edu/music or the Music at Keystone page on Facebook.

Children’s programs to gain from Kirby Fest

Children’s programs to gain from Kirby Fest

Over the past three years, more than 22,000 students visited F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts to attend free children’s programming.
Last year, after funds from an anonymous donor dwindled, the Kirby Center had to brainstorm about ways to keep the Young People’s Theater Series free for audiences. From that grew the venue’s first fundraiser, one that returns this Saturday, April 21.
The second F.M. Kirby Fest: A Night of Pints, Pinot and Performing Arts kicks off at 5 p.m. at the downtown Wilkes-Barre venue. Executive director Will Beekman said this year’s event includes “more of everything” at a lower rate. The all-inclusive tickets cost $25 for Kirby members and $30 for nonmembers in advance, and $35 the day of the event. 
To align with the night’s laid-back vibe, guests can wander among the tables of food and drink vendors at their own pace. Unlike traditional Kirby Center events, people do not receive assigned seats and can eat and sit wherever they choose — even on the stage.
“What I find I am most excited for was that at last year’s event, before it was even over, vendors were asking if we were doing it again,” Beekman said. “They got just as much out of it as vendors as our patrons did. Those vendors were excited to come back on board, and then other vendors heard about it. I don’t want to say it wasn’t difficult … but we found it relatively easier to get so many people involved this year.”
Lauren Pluskey McLain, director of development, and Joell Yarmel, manager of membership and corporate sponsorship, booked more than 30 food, wine and beer vendors to place around the theater’s chandelier lobby, mezzanine lobby and downstairs gallery.
Vendors involved in the event include Benny Brewing, Nimble Hill Winery & Brewery, and North Slope, Susquehanna and Wallenpaupack brewing companies; wine from Maiolatesi Wine Cellars, Pisano Family Wines, and Bartolai and Freas Farm wineries; and food from Soup Chic, Genetti’s, Rodano’s, Stegmaier Mansion, City Market & Cafe and Arena Bar & Grill, among others.
Live entertainment will come from K8, PaulSko, Jamie Anzalone from County Lines, Dymond Cutter and Rockology Academy students.
A silent auction of show memorabilia will take place throughout the night and includes signed posters from the likes of Jerry Seinfeld, Frankie Valli, Theresa Caputo, Johnny Mathis, the Beach Boys and Alice Cooper.  
“In addition to having a larger event in terms of vendors, we have a larger number of autographed items available for auction,” Beekman noted. “Most of the performers who have been at the Kirby Center since last year signed something for us to auction.”
To further support the local arts scene, a handful of artists will display their artwork during the event, including Brittany Boote, Naomi Martin and Tom Martin, with others to be announced.
“I think it’s a win-win-win,” Beekman said. “We get to showcase all of the great local talent, great local restaurants and great local wineries and breweries while also helping to underwrite our children’s educational programs, especially in a time when all of these art and music classes are being cut from our schools.”

_________________________________________________________________

If you go
What: Kirby Fest — A Night of Pints, Pinot and Performing Arts
When: Saturday, April 21, 5 to 8 p.m.
Where: F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
Details: Tickets cost $30 for nonmembers and $25 for members in advance, and $35 at the door.
Online: kirbycenter.org

Clubs – April 19, 2018

Clubs – April 19, 2018

Thursday, April 19
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Tom Waskevich
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Line dancing with Chris and Darlene
Bart & Urby’s, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Trivia Night
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Open mic with Big Al and Billy Edwards
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Karaoke with Edwin
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam
Chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Kartune
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Bingo Night
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Know Limit Trivia
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Karaoke
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Walau-Eh, the Russells, Terrorize This and Reflex Machine
Levels Bar & Grill, 519 Linden St., Scranton: DJ NRG
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: DJ Famous
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Bowie Live: Ultimate David Bowie Tribute
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: The Frost
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Lab — Comedy Showcase
World of Brew Bar & Bottle Shop, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Open call hosted by Jami Kali

Friday, April 20
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Gary Flanagan acoustic
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Hot Coffee
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Karaoke
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Flyin Blind
The Beaumont Inn, 4437 Route 309, Dallas: Don Shapelle Duo
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Strawberry Jam Duo
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: 20LB Head Duo
Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: DJ NRG
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Flatland Ruckus
Grotto Pizza/Grand Slam Sports Bar, RR 415, Harveys Lake: Empire in Decline
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Asialena Duo
Harry’s Bar, 302 Penn Ave., Scranton: Graces Downfall
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Inferno Drag Show
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Great Rock Pair
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Knightlife, Cheap Seats, Stay Loud, Ace and the Kings
JJ Bridjes Restaurant, 925 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit: Robby Walsh and Jack Foley
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Jim Carro
Molly O’Sheas at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Mike & Mike
Morganz Pub and Eatery, 325 Green Ridge St., Scranton: Acousticstein
O’Malley Irish Pub, 3277 Birney Ave., Scranton: Jung Bergo’s 10th anniversary show
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: Dan the Piano Man and Better Than Bad
The Other Side, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Mad Conductor with the Queeftones, Deathwish Birdie and the Pigeon Lookout Squad and VOW
R & J’s Wild Rover Pub, 1315 Hamlin Highway, Lake Ariel: Marilyn Kennedy
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: Flux Capacitor & Starbird
Smiler’s Grill & Bar, 600 Main St., Dickson City: Dashboard Mary
The Tauras Club, 106 W. Market St., Scranton: The Wanabees
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Holidaze with John Quinn, Wandering Aloud, Alex O’Brien and Jordan Ramirez
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Victim
The Wine Cellar, 815 Mulberry St., Scranton: Clarence Spady Band
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Brad Lowery with Rubi Nicholas and Tyler Rothrock

Saturday, April 21
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Wanabees
Ale Mary’s at the Bittenbender, 126 Franklin Ave., Scranton: Q-Ball
Ali Baba Liquor Lounge, 219 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Ray J
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Flatland Ruckus
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Flaxy Morgan
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Sweet Pepper & the Long Hots
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Gone Crazy
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: M80
Harry’s Bar, 302 Penn Ave., Scranton: Ostrich Hat
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Hot Stuff — Burlesque
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Inner Temple, Crookshanks, Second Suitor, Brighter Days, and Doyle & the Deubs
The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton: E57 and Pals
The Manor of Carbondale, 8 Salem Ave., Carbondale: Marilyn Kennedy
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: 30 Pack Lite
Molly O’Sheas at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Dustin Switzer Duo
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: Graces Downfall
The Other Side, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Strength for a Reason, Word Attack, Worn, Broken Homes, Misfit Creatures Guild, Six Year Suffering and One Step Closer
Pour Boys Bar, 932 Wyoming Ave., Scranton: Dashboard Mary
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: The Lizards
Skytop Lodge, 1 Skytop Lodge Road, Skytop: Doug Smith Orchestra
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Chatter
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Light Weight
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Until Sunrise
Waldo’s Tavern, 406 Green Ridge St., Scranton: Jackson Vee and Lissa K
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Brad Lowery with Rubi Nicholas and Tyler Rothrock

Sunday, April 22
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Not Yo Granny’s Bingo
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Karaoke with DJ Huff

Monday, April 23
Duffy’s Coffee House, 306 S. State St., Clarks Summit: Open jam session
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: DJ APTRIK

Tuesday, April 24
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Bill Hoffman, open mic
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Know Limit Trivia
Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N Washington Ave., Scranton: Jack Bordo and Jim Cullen
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Eddie Appnel

Wednesday, April 25
Adezzo, 515 Center St., Scranton: Be Daring Open Mic
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Karaoke with Tiffany
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Open mic night
Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N Washington Ave., Scranton: Colleen and Jim Reynolds
Ole Tyme Charley’s Restaurant & Pub, 31 S. River St., Plains Twp.: Karaoke
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: Karaoke with DJ Edwin Velez
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Utopix

Razzle dazzle ‘Chicago’ returns to Scranton with ‘All That Jazz’ and more

Razzle dazzle ‘Chicago’ returns to Scranton with ‘All That Jazz’ and more

Walter Bobbie knows just a bit about Scranton, Broadway and all that jazz.
Well, maybe more.
Since making his way to New York City decades ago after graduating from University of Scranton, the Tony Award-winning city native built a resume full of starring roles and star-making directorial efforts, including 1996’s Broadway revival of “Chicago,” which continues to run there.
Legendary choreographer and actor Bob Fosse staged the original “Chicago” on Broadway in 1975. It ran for two years, but the revival has completed nearly 9,000 performances, won six Tonys — including one for Bobbie’s directing — and is the longest-running American musical in Broadway history. This weekend, Broadway Theatre League of Northeastern Pennsylvania brings the national tour back to Scranton for five shows from Friday, April 13, through Sunday, April 15, at Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.
Bobbie, 72, had hoped to visit to his hometown “to be able to share the moment” with the “Chicago” audience, but his return to the Broadway spotlight — portraying Peter Cauchon, Bishop of Beauvais, in “Saint Joan” — prevents that. The play about St. Joan of Arc — whose cast also includes Condola Rashad and Jack Davenport — opens Wednesday, April 25, at Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., New York City.
The grandson of Polish coal miners, Bobbie described his beginnings in Scranton as modest. He and his family moved out of the city when he was about 11, but Bobbie returned to study at University of Scranton. During a trip to the 1964 World’s Fair in New York City, he saw “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” on Broadway and thought, “I’m coming back here. This is what I want to do.”
“Saint Joan” marks Bobbie’s first Broadway acting gig since he played Nicely-Nicely Johnson in the early ’90s’ “Guys and Dolls” revival. His career there began with 1971’s musical “Frank Merriwell” and picked up speed when he originated the role of Roger in “Grease” in 1972.
Bobbie acted in several other productions in the ensuing years but also developed a desire to direct. He helmed little projects here and there, he said, and conceived and directed the Tony-nominated musical revue “A Grand Night for Singing.”
“Nothing’s overnight,” Bobbie said. “It’s just that sometimes you have the opportunity to really leap forward in a way you couldn’t have planned or imagined or dreamed.”
He started directing for the “City Center’s Encores!” concert series and became its artistic director. After he directed “Chicago” for the series, he said, it “took off like a rocket”and moved to Broadway within a year.
At the time, the O.J. Simpson murder trial had recently transfixed the nation, which Bobbie felt made “Chicago’s” story of the interplay of crime and fame timely. And that “topic has never gone away,” he added, enabling “Chicago’s” record-breaking run. While the 1970s version came across as more of a satire and indictment of America’s judicial system, Bobbie said, today the story seems like “more of a documentary.”
“Basically, it’s about getting away with murder,” he said. “It’s about the use and abuse of celebrity. … As much as it is a lot of razzle-dazzle and a lot of toe-tapping, it also leaves your mind engaged.”
Bobbie and Ann Reinking — who starred as Roxie Hart in the original show and the revival, which she also choreographed — wanted to honor Fosse’s “theatrical imagination” but not replicate his ’70s version, Bobbie said. The pair started by reworking three major numbers, such as by making “Cell Block Tango” look “like one of those great Fosse chair numbers,” Bobbie explained.
“I think that one of the nicest things that’s ever been said to me (was) by the great agent of Sam Cohn. … He said, ‘If Fosse was alive today, this is how he would do it,” Bobbie said.
Eager to direct, Bobbie did not think about the show’s potential success at the time but rather his commitment to things and how they stimulate the imagination.
“(Scenic designer John Lee Beatty) and I decided early on … that we wanted to put the band in a jury box on stage,” he said. “We compressed them. Everybody should be trapped in this show. We continued to use visual metaphors that kept informing our process. And then we had all this joyous music with this singular dance vocabulary.”
Paulette Merchel — Marywood University’s former theater program director, chair of Broadway Theater’s education committee and a relative of Bobbie’s by marriage — said tears filled her eyes the first time she saw “Chicago” on Broadway, in part because it put into perspective all Bobbie had achieved. Bobbie presented “Chicago” in a more abstract, minimalist way that “makes you stop and think,” Merchel said.
“To see something that from the first moment was exciting and fresh and different and compelling and contemporary,” she said. “I appreciated it immediately as a new era. He was part of a new era of getting the message through musical comedy out in such a different way.”
The public tells whether a show succeeds, Bobbie said, and they certainly did that with “Chicago.” Besides running for decades in New York, it spawned several tours and an Oscar-winning film adaptation.
Since earning his Tony, Bobbie has gone on to direct such Broadway shows as “Sweet Charity,” “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas,” “Footloose” and Steve Martin’s “Bright Star.”
“I feel blessedly part of the theater community, and I have since I got here,” Bobbie said. “I don’t know how that happened. I got off the bus and started working. If they wanted to get rid of me, they missed their shot 40 years ago.” 

Bobbie has returned to Scranton through the years and said he feels honored to know the community has supported him during his career.
“All I can say is that if you’re in Scranton and you’re interested in the arts, stay there, make a difference in the arts, or do what I did and follow your dream. … I’ve been all over the planet because of ‘Chicago’ alone, (not) including my other work,” he said. “It’s important when you’re in Scranton to dream big, and if not, stay in Scranton and make a difference, because it’s a remarkable community.”
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If you go
What: “Chicago,” presented by Broadway Theatre League of Northeastern Pennsylvania
When: Friday, April 13, 8 p.m.; Saturday, April 14, 2 and 8 p.m.; and Sunday, April 15, 1 and 6:30 p.m.
Where: Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.
Details: Tickets cost $42 to $77 and are available at the box office, ticketmaster.com and 800-745-3000. For more information, visit broadwayinscranton.com.

What: “Saint Joan,” starring Scranton native Walter Bobbie
When: Now in previews; show officially opens Wednesday, April 25
Where: Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., New York City
Details: Tickets cost $65 to $145 and are available at telecharge.com/Broadway/Saint-Joan/Ticket. For more information, visit manhattantheatreclub.com.

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Dance workshop and talkback
Broadway Theater League of Northeastern Pennsylvania will offer a jazz dance workshop with members of “Chicago’s” touring company Saturday, April 14, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Ballet Theatre of Scranton’s studio, 310 Penn Ave. The program is open to intermediate and advance student dancers and dance teachers. Admission is $25 and includes a ticket to that day’s 2 p.m. “Chicago” performance. Reservations are required by today and can be made by calling Broadway Theatre League’s office at 570-342-7784.
Following that 2 p.m. show, Toyota of Scranton will present a talk-back with “Chicago” representatives in the Scranton Cultural Center theater. The free talk-back is open to workshop students and anyone from the public who wants to stay after the performance.

Fab 5 – April 12, 2018

Fab 5 – April 12, 2018

1. Lewis & Clarke

Enjoy a night of art-pop and avant-folk music with Lewis & Clarke at an installation by artist and host Samuelle Green.
The show will take place Friday, April 13, at 8 p.m. at Basin and Main, 564 Main St., Honesdale. The event is for all ages and donations are encouraged. Doors open 7:30.
Behind Lewis & Clarke is the voice of songwriter, instrumentalist, composer and producer Lou Rogai, who has toured multiple continents and released several acclaimed records for more than decade. He will perform amid the Paper Caves, a large-scale art installation Green created using about 1 million individually hand-rolled paper cones. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.

2. ‘The Rat Pack Together Again’

Hear the classic music of some of the world’s favorite singers at the Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton.
Set for Friday, April 13, at 7 p.m., ‘The Rat Pack Together Again’ features hits from Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. Audiences can expect to hear such hits as “Come Fly with Me,” “My Way,” “That’s Amore” and “Mr. Bojangles,” with accompaniment from an eight-piece band.
Tickets cost $35 to $45 and are available at the box office, thetheateratnorth.com and 570-800-5020, ext. 102.

3. ‘The Princes’

Take in a night of comedy with the Princes at Electric City Escape, 507 Linden Ave., Scranton.
On Friday, April 13, at 9 p.m., the five-act comedy will show what happens when three exiled fairy-tale princes living in the modern world must resort to community theater to get back into their father’s good graces.
Tickets for the 18-and-older show cost $10. To reserve seats, call 570-862-8858.

4. ‘Legally Blonde: The Musical’

See a popular movie adapted for the stage when Liva Arts Company presents “Legally Blonde: The Musical” at University of Scranton.
Performances run Thursday, April 12, and Friday, April 13, at 8 p.m. and Saturday, April 14, at 2 and 8 p.m. at PNC Auditorium, Loyola Science Center, 204 Monroe Ave., Scranton.
Based on the 2001 film of the same name, the musical tells the story of Elle Woods, who attends Harvard Law School to get her boyfriend back and ends up defying expectations.
Tickets are $5. For more information, call 570-941-7400.

5. Electric City Tattoo Convention

Tattoo enthusiasts will descend on Scranton this weekend as the Electric City Tattoo Convention returns.
The convention begins at 3 p.m. on Friday, April 13, and at noon on Saturday, April 14, and Sunday, April 15, at Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave. The weekend will feature 160 tattoo artists from across the country, several vendors and other events, such as sword swallowing and contests.
Tickets are $15 for a single-day pass, $40 for a weekend pass and $55 for a weekend pass with a convention T-shirt. Tickets will only be available at the door. For more information, visit electriccitytattoo.com.

Clubs – April 12, 2018

Clubs – April 12, 2018

Thursday, April 12
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Sarah Came
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Line dancing with Chris and Darlene
Bart & Urby’s, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Trivia Night
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Open mic with Big Al and Billy Edwards
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Karaoke with Edwin
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam
Chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Kartune
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Bingo Night
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Know Limit Trivia
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Karaoke
Honeychilds’, 109 E. Drinker St., Dunmore: Ron Morgan
Levels Bar & Grill, 519 Linden St., Scranton: DJ NRG
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: DJ Famous
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Marilyn Kennedy
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Jordan Ramirez
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Lab — Comedy Showcase
World of Brew Bar & Bottle Shop, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Open Call hosted by Jami Kali

Friday, April 13
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: J.P. Williams Blues Duo
Andy Gavin’s, 1392 N. Washington Ave., Scranton: Ron Morgan
Ale Mary’s at the Bittenbender, 126 Franklin Ave., Scranton: Neil Nicastro
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Hot Coffee
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Karaoke
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: DWest
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Jimmy T
The Beaumont Inn, 4437 Route 309, Dallas: Dex
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Doug and Sean
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Acousticstein
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Tritide
Club at the Highlands, 2700 Highland Blvd., Archbald: Juke Box Memories
C.J.’s Lounge, 5431 Haas Pond Road, Madison Twp.: Dashboard Mary
Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: DJ NRG
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Leighann and Company
Grotto Pizza/Grand Slam Sports Bar, RR 415, Harveys Lake: Strawberry Jam
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Liar, Liar
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Inferno Drag Show
Hog’s Hollow Saloon, 1459 Route 93, Berwick: Crobot Acoustic
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Mike Hagan & Lynette
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Zayre Mountain, 3IB, Gods of Space and Todd Oravic
The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton: Permanence, Suburban Samurai and Alma Mater
M&J’s Bar N Grill, 542 Wildcat Road, Olyphant: Marilyn Kennedy
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Seize Fire
Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Nanticoke: Kartune
Molly O’Sheas at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Double Shot Duo
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: The Nexgen
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: Mike Dougherty Band
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: The Molly Pitcher Path Duo and Jeff Cavanaugh
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Behind the Grey
Wildflowers New York Bistro, 600 Wildflower Drive, Wilkes-Barre: Jeff Lewis
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Eric Lyden, Andy Beningo, and Jason Brown

Saturday, April 14
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Dales Jukebox
Ale Mary’s at the Bittenbender, 126 Franklin Ave., Scranton: Asialena
Ariel View Inn, 1400 Lake Ariel Highway, Lake Ariel: Marilyn Kennedy
Augustine’s Club 17, 518 N. Main St., Old Forge: Greg Palmer
Backyard Ale House, 523 Linden St., Scranton: Fuzzy Mudd
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Barrel-Chested Beer Bellies
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: The Music Room
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Acousticstein
Blu Wasabi, 223 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit: FullCircle
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Jack Foley and Robbie Walsh
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Timepiece
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Flaxy Morgan
Cavanaugh’s Grille, 163 N. Main St., Mountain Top: Stoned By Proxy
Hog’s Hollow Saloon, 1459 Route 93, Berwick: Jesse Wade Gang
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Eddie Appnel
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Wolfman and the Brimstone Boys
Karl Hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Everything Turned To Color, Rosary Guild and Joe Burke
Levels Bar & Grill, 519 Linden St., Scranton: Dance Hall
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Last Call Duo
Molly O’Sheas at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Kira Lee
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: DJ Nino Blanco, Paul LaQuintano
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: Halfway to Hell (AC/DC tribute)
Skytop Lodge, 1 Skytop Lodge Road, Skytop: Doug Smith Orchestra
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Jeffrey James Band
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Penntera (Pantera tribute) and Ron Schoonover
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Mace in Dickson
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Eric Lyden, Andy Beningo and Jason Brown

Sunday, April 15
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Not Yo Granny’s Bingo
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Robby Bloodshed, Vagora and Crookshanks
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Karaoke with DJ Huff

Monday, April 16
Duffy’s Coffee House, 306 S. State St., Clarks Summit: Open jam session
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: DJ APTRIK

Tuesday, April 17
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Bill Hoffman, open mic
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Know Limit Trivia
III Guys Pizzeria & Restaurant, 11 Garbutt Ave., Dallas: Dave Abraham
The Other Side, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Rich People, the Insides, Head Spell and Fantasy Camp

Wednesday, April 18
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Open mic night
Ole Tyme Charley’s Restaurant & Pub, 31 S. River St., Plains Twp.: Karaoke
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: DJ Edwin Velez

Pop goes Sordoni – Gallery turns to comic art, illustration for new exhibit

Pop goes Sordoni – Gallery turns to comic art, illustration for new exhibit

Comic art and illustrations surround consumers on a daily basis, from Sunday comic strips to advertisements.
The newest exhibit at Wilkes University’s Sordoni Art Gallery, 141 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, opens Saturday, April 7, and shines a light on this genre with “Selections from the Sordoni Collection of American Illustration & Comic Art.”
The exhibit formed from the personal collection of Andrew J. Sordoni III, who began gathering illustrations and comic art in high school after buying his first Maxfield Parrish drawing. Although he traded that piece many years ago, Sordoni still has the first piece of comic art he bought, a “Prince Valiant” Sunday page.
“It’s actually in the exhibition,” he said. “It ran in the Sunday Independent in Wilkes-Barre. … It’s drawn by Hal Foster. I remember it very well.”
Sordoni’s interest in the genre stemmed from his love for fictional characters, ranging from cowboys and detectives to classic literary characters such as King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. He assembled the collection over 50 years.
Stanley I. Grand, former Sordoni gallery director, curated the exhibit, which includes 135 works from more than 100 artists. The display includes notable illustrations from Norman Rockwell, J.C. Leyendecker, N.C. Wyeth, Maxfield Parrish and Frank Schoonover as well as comic strip artist from George Herriman, Milton Caniff and Charles M. Schulz, among many others.
“It’s lowbrow art,” Sordoni said of the genre. “It is not cerebral; it’s visceral. It reflects American popular culture. It’s the stuff that entertained us and that we lived with every day. On the illustration side of it, they are included in more than just magazine art or newspapers. It includes advertising art, calendar art, pinup art, glamor art and art that was commercialized, designed to sell products.”The gallery will host three Wednesday lectures during the exhibit’s run so illustration and comic lovers can delve deeper into the genre and the works on display. A curator’s tour with Grand takes place April 11, “What Makes a Pulp Different Than a Slick” with illustration historian David Saunders follows April 25, and “A Solitary Figure in American Illustration” with Sordoni rounds out the series May 2. All lectures take place at 4:30 p.m. in Room 135 of Karambelas Media Center. All Sordoni exhibits and events are free and open to the public.
“(The gallery) presents all kinds of art hoping to educate and inform and entertain the audience,” Sordoni said. “Some people will not like it, and some people will adore it. That’s true of all genres of art and various categories of art. This is just one more offering that gives some breadth to the university.”

If you go
What: “Selections from the Sordoni Collection of American Illustration & Comic Art”
When: Saturday, April 7, through Sunday, May 20; Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, noon to 5 p.m.
Where: Sordoni Art Glalery, Karambelas Media Center at Wilkes University, 141 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre
Details: Visit wilkes.edu/arts/sordoni-art-gallery.

Special events
Opening reception: Saturday, April 7, 4:30 to 6 p.m., Sordoni Art Glalery, Karambelas Media Center at Wilkes University, 141 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre
Lecture series: Curator’s tour with Stanley I. Grand, Ph.D. Wednesday, April 11; “What Makes a Pulp Different than a Slick” with illustration historian David Saunders, Wednesday, April 25; and “A Solitary Figure in American Illustration” with Andrew Sordoni, Wednesday, May 2; all 4:30 p.m., Room 135, Karambelas Media Center, Wilkes University

Fab 5 – April 5, 2018

Fab 5 – April 5, 2018

1. Elvis tribute show

Join JZ Tours for dinner and an Elvis tribute show at Radisson at Lackawanna Station Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
Pittston’s Shawn Klush — an actor, entertainer, recording artist and Elvis tribute artist — will perform Friday, April 6, and Saturday, April 7. Doors open at 6 p.m., and dinner featuring music by Nicole Rasmus starts at 7. Klush’s performance begins at 8:30.
Tickets start at $75. For reservations, call 570-344-2212 or visit jztours.com.

2. 69th annual Irem Shrine Circus

The 69th annual Irem Shrine Circus has again stopped in Northeast Pennsylvania.
Performances continue Thursday, April 5, and Friday, April 6, at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. plus Saturday, April 7, at 1:30 and 7 p.m. at the 109th Artillery Armory, 208 Market St., Kingston.
Tickets cost $8, $11 and $22 for the main floor and $13 and $17 for the balcony. For more information, call 570-714-0783 or 570-714-1792.

3. Third Annual Buy Local Spring Fling

Support local businesses, artisans and wineries at the third annual Buy Local Spring Fling Marketplace.
On Saturday, April 7, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., will welcome 75 local vendors selling a range of products, from artwork to food to crafts. The first 1,000 patrons through the doors receive a free reusable shopping bag. Food and drinks will be available for purchase.
Admission is $2. For more information, call 570-346-7369, ext. 138, or visit scrantonculturalcenter.org.

4. First Friday Live with Eye on Attraction

Celebrate First Friday with Alt 92.1’s live concert series.
The Scranton radio station, part of Times-Shamrock Communications, will host the band Eye on Attraction on Friday, April 6, at 6 p.m. in the Alt 92.1 Radio Theater inside the Scranton Times Building, 149 Penn Ave.
The alternative rock band toured nationally with Adelitas Way in 2017 and released its single “Pleasantville” to critical acclaim.
Admission to the all-ages show is free. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page or alt921.com.

5. Pop Art at the Dietrich

Meet the artists behind the pop art paintings and creations featured at Tunkhannock’s Dietrich Theater. “Pop Art” exhibitors Joe Kluck, Michelle McKenzie, Scott Nichols, Mike Reznick, Amanda Robinson and Rhi Wallace will gather with guests at the exhibit Sunday, April 8, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the theater, 60 E. Tioga St. Part of the ongoing Local Art on Display program, the exhibit runs from Friday, March 30, through the end of May
Admission is free. For more information visit the event’s Facebook page or dietrichtheater.com.

Fab 5 – March 29, 2018

Fab 5 – March 29, 2018

1. Happy Hour Fundraiser

Enjoy a night out with pizza and domestic beer while supporting a cause.
On Friday, March 30, at 6 p.m., join Sprint for Service Dogs for a happy hour fundraiser at Backyard Ale House, 523 Linden St., Scranton. The $20 donation includes pizza and domestic drafts, and guests also can check out a silent auction. Proceeds will help with the cost of training Finn, a diabetic service dog scheduled to come to home to his handler between July and August. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page or sprintforservicedogs.com.

2. Cask for a Cause

Head to Firkin Friday to help raise money for Scranton Reads.
The Casks for a Cause benefit takes place Friday, March 30, at 5 p.m. at Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, and includes basket and 50/50 raffles plus beer from Susquehanna Brewing Co.
Scranton Reads will also be revealing 2018’s selected book. All money raised will benefit Scranton Reads activities in the fall.

3. Spring 2018 Film Festival Preview Day

Get a sneak-peek of what movies the Dietrich Theater will screen during its spring film festival.
On Thursday, March 29, the theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock, will show trailers of the festival’s 21 movies, including Oscar-winner “I, Tonya,” at 1 and 6 p.m. during Spring 2018 Film Festival Preview Day. Admission is free. For more information, call 570-836-1022 or visit dietrichtheater.com.

4. Christopher Cross

Grammy Award-winning songwriter and musician Christopher Cross will perform Wednesday, April 4, at F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre.
Cross made musical history in 1980 when his self-titled album earned him five Grammys. His second studio album, “Another Page,” included his biggest and most recognizable hit, “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do).”
Doors open at 6 p.m., and the show starts at 7:30. Tickets cost $25, $35 and $45, plus fees. For more information or tickets, visit kirbycenter.org or call 570-826-1100.

5. Shakespeare on Film: ‘The Taming of the Shrew’

Watch one of Shakespeare’s most-loved comedies on the screen at the Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale, on Thursday, March 29.
The Shakespeare on Film series will feature “The Taming of the Shrew,” which focuses on the courtship of Petruchio and Katherina, who initially is unwilling to participate in the relationship.
Dr. Robert Dugan will introduce the story with a brief background and orientation at 7 p.m. Audience members will have a chance to share their impressions after the film.
Donations are encouraged and accepted at the door. For more information, call 570-253-2020 or visit thecooperageproject.org.