Frights and delights Scare yourself silly with region’s haunted attractions

Frights and delights Scare yourself silly with region’s haunted attractions

Northeast Pennsylvania knows how to deliver the frights each Halloween season.
The region is home to numerous haunted attractions, which offer everything from spooky hayrides to creeping creatures to houses where spirits run rampant. So get in line and put on your brave face — you’re going to need it.
Circle of Screams
Watch movie scenes come alive during the Haunted Hayride into the woods, take in the creepy performers at the Cirque de Peur sideshow, and brave the haunted rooms of Delfino Manor. If you’re still in the mood for scares, stick around to catch a movie on the drive-in’s big screen.

Where: Circle Drive-in, 1911 Scranton-Carbondale Highway, Dickson City
When: Fridays through Sundays through Oct. 28; ticket booth open 6 to 10:30 p.m.; last ride leaves at 11 p.m.
Admission: Haunted Hayride and Cirque de Peur, $15; Delfino Manor (rain or shine), $15; Haunted Hayride, Cirque de Peur and Delfino Manor, $25; drive-in movies, $8 adults/$5 children
Details: circleofscreams.com,
570-489-5731 and dcastelli@circleofscreams.com

Hellstead Manor
This indoor haunted attraction takes place in a grand house and includes free parking.
Where: 630 Harmony Road, Great Bend Twp.
When: Fridays and Saturdays, 7 to 11 p.m., and Sundays, 7 to 10 p.m., through Oct. 28
Admission: $20
Details: hellsteadmanor.com, 570-396-5871 and info@hellsteadmanor.com

Dracula’s Forest
Guests can wind their way through the spooky scenery of two attractions, the Haunted Hay Ride and the Dark Kingdom. For younger visitors who want some scare-free fun, the Not-So-Scary Hay Ride opens on weekend afternoons.
Where: 2828 Rock Road, Ransom Twp.
When: Haunted Hay Ride and the Dark Kingdom, Fridays through Sundays through Oct. 28, 7:30 p.m. (ticket booth open Fridays and Saturdays, 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 6:30 to 10 p.m.), weather permitting; Little Screamer’s Not-So-Scary Hay Ride, Saturdays and Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m., through Oct. 28 (last wagon leaves at 4:30 p.m.)
Admission: Haunted Hay Ride, $15 ages 11 and older/$10 children 10 and younger with paying adult; Haunted Hay Ride and Dark Kingdom combo, $25 ages 11 and older; free for active military members with ID; Not-So-Scary Hay Ride, $8; parking, $3 (parking benefits Newton Ransom Volunteer Fire Company)
Details: draculasforest.com, 570-586-5084 and FindersKep@aol.com

Reaper’s Revenge
This 60-acre spot offers four haunted attractions: a haunted hayride; Lost Carnival, a walk-through set in a dark forest; Pitch Black, an indoor walk-through; and Sector 13, a zombie maze. The attractions stay open until all guests have gone through, but they must arrive by 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and by 10 p.m. on Sundays. They are not recommended for children under 10.
Where: 460 Green Grove Road, Scott Twp.
When: Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m. to 1 a.m., and Sundays, 6 to 11 p.m., through Nov. 3
Admission: $45 general/$40 Friday general with printable coupon/$35 Sunday general with printable coupon/$25 VIP upgrade/$70 VIP package (general admission with VIP upgrade)/$3 parking/$5 zombie paintball; active and retired military discounts available regularly plus on Military Family Day (Sunday, Oct. 28)
Details: reapersrevenge.net and 570-254-8038

Gravestone Manor
Marking its 20th anniversary this year, the all volunteer-manned attraction presents a new story, “Spirits of the Manor,” about a game show host seeking to drive spirits from the home. The attraction is not recommended for children under 8.
Where: Trion warehouse, 1095 Route 315, Plains Twp.
When: Fridays and Saturdays, 7 to 10 p.m., and Sundays, 7 to 9:30 p.m., through Oct. 28
Admission: $10; all proceeds benefit the United Way of Wyoming Valley
Details: gravestonemanor.com, gravestonemanor@gmail.com and 570-821-6500

Horror Hall
Guests will need about 20 minutes to complete the quarter-mile walk through this indoor haunted attraction.
Where: 11 E. Poplar St., Plymouth Twp.
When: Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m. to midnight, and Sundays, 6 to 10 p.m., through Oct. 28
Admission: $14 general/$19 fast pass
Details: facebook.com/HorrorHall, horrorhall1@gmail.com or plymouthtwpfirerescue@gmail.com

Hotel of Horror
This Monroe County site features several attractions, including the main Hotel of Horror, focusing on sanitarium residents locked in solitary confinement; Altered Nightmares, based on the occult underworld; and the Theatre of the Damned variety show. The action takes place rain or shine.
Where: 5105 Cherry Valley Road, Hamilton Twp.
When: Fridays through Oct. 26, 7 to 11 p.m.; Saturdays through Oct. 27, 6 to 11 p.m.; and Sundays through Oct. 28; Wednesday, Oct. 31; Friday, Nov. 2; and Saturday, Nov. 3, 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: Hotel of Horror, $25 Fridays and Saturdays/$20 Sundays; Hotel of Horror and Altered Nightmares combo, $35 Fridays and Saturdays/$30 Sundays; Theatre of the Damned, $5; VIP line jumper pass, $10
Details: hotelofhorror.com, info@hotelofhorror.com or 570-992-3278

Fab 5 – October 11, 2018

Fab 5 – October 11, 2018

1. ‘American Visionary: John F. Kennedy’s Life & Times’
Take a look inside the life of the 35th president of the United States at Everhart Museum.
“American Visionary: John F. Kennedy’s Life & Times” features a collection of photographs of Kennedy’s public and private life. Curated from public sources to private family albums, some images are iconic, and others have never been seen before.
An exhibition reception and tour will take place Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 6 p.m. at the museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. Tickets cost $50 and include light refreshments and cocktails. Guest speakers include Stephen Kennedy Smith, Lawrence Schiller and more. For reservations or more information, call 570-346-7186, ext. 510. The exhibit will be on display inside Gallery 7 through Monday, Dec. 31.

2. Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons
Whether you know him from his rise to fame in 1962 or from the music of the Tony Award-winning show “Jersey Boys,” you’re sure to recognize the sounds of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons.
The legendary singer and his group will perform at F. M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre, on Sunday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. Doors open at 5:30.
Valli — who in his youth often spent time in Dunmore, where his maternal grandmother lived — has made numerous stops in the region through the years with his group, known for hits such as “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Rag Doll” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You.” Tickets for his Kirby Center show cost $69, $89 and $125 and can be purchased online at Ticketmaster.com, at the box office and by calling 570-826-1100.

3. Not Another Punk Rock Flea Market: Halloween Edition 
If you’re looking for some spooky decorations to spruce up your house this season, swing by the Not Another Punk Rock Flea Market: Halloween Edition.
The event will take place Sunday, Oct. 14, from 2 to 7 p.m. at Keyser Valley Community Center, 101 N. Keyser Ave, Scranton. Vendors will sell items such as original artwork, zines and pins as well as vintage clothing, vinyl records, casettes, antiques and collectibles. Admission is free, and all ages are welcome.
For more information, visit the Facebook event page.

4. Sharon’s Transplant Fundraiser 
Enjoy a night of food and fun for a good cause at Sharon’s Transplant Fundraiser this weekend.
Set for Saturday, Oct. 13, from 6 to 10 p.m. in St. Mary’s Center, 320 Mifflin Ave., Scranton, the event features Music by Majik, 50/50 and basket raffles, and a cash bar for beer and wine. For $20 admission ($10 for children 13 and younger), guests can nosh on heavy appetizers and light fare, and those 21 and older will receive a coupon for a free beer with their ticket. Representatives from the Gift of Life program will be on hand to sign up people for the organ donation registry.
Proceeds from the fundraiser help Sharon Sylvester Lynady, who lives with chronic kidney disease and desperately seeks a transplant. Organizers hope to raise awareness about organ donation on behalf of Lynady. For more information, visit slkidney.com

5. Austin Burke art auction
Austin Burke, the now-retired former president of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce, will auction off some of his original artwork as a fundraiser for Scranton’s Albright Memorial Library.
The 21-and-older event will take place Thursday, Oct. 11, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the library, 500 Vine St. Guests can enjoy hors d’oevres and a limited bar as they preview Burke’s artwork during a reception to open the night, and the auction will begin at 7. Michael Melcher, theater director for the Creative and Performing Arts Academy of NEPA, will be the auctioneer.
Tickets cost $20 and can be bought online at albright.org and at the library. For more information, visit austinburkeart.com.

Fright on film

Fright on film

Creepy, campy films and more on deck for fourth annual NEPA Horror Film Festival

Thanks to Bobby Keller, they crept in from places as far as Australia, Russia, Israel and the United Kingdom to find a place at Dickson City’s Circle Drive-in theater.
For the fourth year, the Scranton resident has coordinated and curated a collection of creepy, campy and comedic movies for his annual NEPA Horror Film Festival.
Set for Sunday, Oct. 7, starting at 7 p.m., the festival will screen 13 short films ranging from 30 seconds to 13 minutes at the drive-in. About half of the selected movies are from the United States, while the rest are international, and they all clock in under the 13-minute mark thanks to advice Keller received from “Monstervision” host Joe Bob Briggs, the special guest at 2016’s NEPA Horror Film Festival.
“You go over that and people start to get bored,” shared Keller, a horror fan and filmmaker. “Anybody will enjoy this, even if you go in having no knowledge (of the genre). It’s pretty straight-forward. These are all unknown filmmakers; you’ll be seeing films you’ve never seen.”
Among the titles featured are “Bride of Frankie,” a “feminist version of ‘Bride of Frankenstein,’” Keller explained, and festival opener “Hell of a Day,” an Australian apocalyptic zombie movie. Since each of the films is unrated, Keller advised parents to use discretion with children in attendance because of scenes with blood, gore and very brief nudity.
“It’s all very campy, and this year is more horror-comedy than straight-up horror,” Keller said. “But the last three years, we’ve had kids there with no complaints.”
In between films, music videos from Metal Blade Records will play, and Keller said he called Dracula and invited him and his friends to walk around and spook guests in their cars. The haunted attraction Circle of Screams on site will be open that night with separate admission as well.
Tickets to the film festival cost $8. Making the event inexpensive and accessible was crucial to Keller.
“Growing up in the DIY punk-rock scene, I like to keep things cheap,” he said.
In previous years, the festival took place at River Street Jazz Cafe in Plains Twp. and Ale Mary’s and the former Iron Horse Movie Bistro, both in Scranton. But partnering with Circle Drive-in to host the films has been a dream come true, Keller noted.
“It’s unbelievable, especially since I love the drive-in and I never thought it would get to this point. It really is the perfect venue for what I’m doing, showing horror movies in October,” he said. “This is the time of year people want to get scared and have fun. And I can’t think of a better place to get together to watch these (films) with your friends. The bigger the group, the better.
“It’s also a throw-back to people from the ’70s and ’80s,” Keller added. “The drive-in was a popular place then, and for kids who have never been to a drive-in before, it’s a new, old experience for them.”
More than anything, Keller feels thrilled to watch how support for the festival has grown through the years. He’s happy to see strangers — and not just friends — coming out to the event, which encourages him to keep it going.
“I’m just really passionate about horror movies, and it’s for people with shared interests,” Keller said. “But it’s a combination of loving horror movies my whole life and wanting to do something for the local community, because people are always complaining there’s nothing going on.
“It’s just a couple hours to escape reality to get scared or laugh or however you watch horror movies.”

Scranton Reads focuses on sci-fi thriller ‘War of the Worlds’

Scranton Reads focuses on sci-fi thriller ‘War of the Worlds’

This year’s featured Scranton Reads book lends itself to a mix of serious and laid-back programs that draw from its classic science-fiction theme.
Readers across the region will pick up H.G. Wells’ 1897 story “The War of the Worlds” in the coming weeks as part of the annual initiative that encourages the community to read a specific book and participate in book discussions and other related events.
“First of all, it’s science-fiction, which is fun, and we haven’t done one of those in a while,” said Jessica Serrenti, spokeswoman for Scranton’s Albright Memorial Library and a Scranton Reads committee member. “But I think it’s also timely with how much media is in our hands now. ‘War of the Worlds’ is a story that just makes you wake up and focus on what’s in front of you … (and) just being aware of our surrounding.”
The joint venture between Scranton Public Library and the city started in 2002 and has featured such stories as “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “The Red Badge of Courage.” This year’s book focuses on an alien invasion of Earth in which humans fight back using a virus. Orson Welles’s infamous October 1938 radio adaptation of the story induced a panic among people who thought an invasion actually was occurring. It has been adapted for the screen a few times as well, most recently by Steven Spielberg in 2005.
Lackawanna County Library System libraries have free copies of the book available, and Scranton Reads also will hand them out during its events and at the Dunmore Cemetery Tour on Sundays, Oct. 7 and 14, at 2 p.m. at the West Warren Street cemetery.
“People were thrilled that it was kind of timely for October with Halloween, and it’s aliens and invasions,” Serrenti said of the book selection. “They got a kick out of that. … It’s reaching kind of a varying audience in that respect.”
Scranton Reads’ programs kick off with a First Friday celebration on Oct. 5 at Albright Memorial Library that will feature artwork inspired by the book.
Other activities focus on the scientific and pandemic sides of the story, including “A Scarcity of Caskets: The 1918 Spanish Flu in Scranton” on Wednesday, Oct. 24, at Lackawanna County Historical Society’s Catlin House, Scranton; “The War of the Worlds: When Will the Next Pandemic Occur?” on Monday, Oct. 29, at Marywood University, Scranton; and “Survival Skills” on Tuesday, Oct. 30, also at Marywood.
Dr. Philip Jenkins of Marywood University, meanwhile, will lead a discussion of philosophical issues in the novel during Albright Memorial Library’s Socrates Café program on Thursday, Oct. 18. And “The World Is Not Coming to an End. Trust Me: A Conversation about Telling the News” will bring together local journalists for a panel discussing “fake” news and how people can better consume news on Wednesday, Oct. 24, at Penn State Scranton, Dunmore.
Scranton Reads also will offer more light-hearted fare, including “War of the Worlds” film screenings and “History of the Carbondale UFO Sighting,” in which historian Robert Powell from Carbondale Historical Society examines the hubbub surrounded a supposed 1974 UFO crash there.
“Everyone has been going crazy for that,” Serrenti said. “They just think it’s such a fun idea just to see all the craziness and wariness that went around it at that time.”
Numerous county libraries will hold book discussions, too.
“Book discussions kind of allow you to keep an open mind about the interpretation of books and how others see it,” Serrenti said.
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Scranton Reads events

First Friday kickoff
When: Friday, Oct. 5, 6 to 8 p.m.
Where: Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., Scranton

“War of the Worlds” film screening
When: Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2 p.m.
Where: Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., Scranton

“History of the Carbondale
UFO Sighting”
When: Wednesday, Oct. 10, 6 p.m.
Where: Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., Scranton

“War of the Worlds” film screening
When: Thursday, Oct. 18, 6 p.m.
Where: Valley Community Library, 739 River St., Peckville

Socrates Café
When: Thursday, Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m.
Where: Henkelman Room, second floor, Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., Scranton

“The World Is Not Coming to an End. Trust Me: A Conversation about Telling the News”
When: Wednesday, Oct. 24,
12:15 p.m.
Where: Hawk Lecture Hall: Business Building 201, Penn State Worthington Scranton, 120 Ridge View Drive, Dunmore

“A Scarcity of Caskets: The 1918 Spanish Flu in Scranton”
When: Wednesday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m.
Where: Catlin House, Lackawanna County Historical Society, 232 Monroe Ave., Scranton

“The War of the Worlds: When Will the Next Pandemic Occur?”
When: Monday, Oct. 29,
6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Learning Commons, Room 206, Marywood University, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton

“Survival Skills”
When: Tuesday, Oct. 30,
6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Learning Commons, Room 206, Marywood University, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton

Book discussions
Thursday, Oct. 4, 6:30 p.m.: Taylor Public Library, 710 S. Main St., Taylor; 570-562-1234

Monday, Oct. 22, 6 p.m.: Nancy Kay Holmes Branch Library, 1032 Green Ridge St., Scranton; 570-207-0764

Thursday, Oct. 25, 1 p.m.: Carbondale Public Library, 5 N. Main St.; 570-282-4281

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 6 p.m.: North Pocono Public Library, 1315 Church St., Moscow; 570– 842-4700.

Tuesday, Oct. 23, 6 p.m.: Abington Community Library, 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks Summit; 570-587-3440

Wednesday, Oct. 24, and Thursday, Oct. 25, 6:30 p.m.: Valley Community Library, 739 River St., Peckville; 570-489-1765

Saturday, Oct. 27, 10:30 a.m.: Dalton Community Library, 113 E. Main St.; 570-563-2014.

Nightlife – October 4, 2018

Nightlife – October 4, 2018

Thursday, Oct. 4
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Shelly’s Underground
Bart & Urby’s, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Trivia Night
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Open Mic with Big Al and Billy Edwards
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Asialena
Border Bar, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Open Call hosted by Jami Kali
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam
Chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Kartune
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Bingo Night
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Know Limit Trivia
HEAT Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Karaoke
Levels Bar & Grill, 519 Linden St., Scranton: DJ NRG
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: DJ Famous
Pour Boys Bar, 932 Wyoming Ave., Scranton: Jeff Lewis
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Music for Models Trio
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Jackson Vee and Lissa
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Lab — Comedy Showcase

Friday, Oct. 5
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Bill Talanca
Ale Mary’s at the Bittenbender, 126 Franklin Ave., Scranton: Jay Orrell
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Karaoke
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erich & Tyler
Bean and Vine Cafe & Wine Bar at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Piano Night
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: The Husty Bros.
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Ctrl-Alt-Del
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Mother Nature’s Sons
Budd’s Pizza Cafe & Sports Hub, 134 Page Ave., Kingston: Dee Maple Band
The Club at the Highlands, 2700 Highland Blvd., Archbald: Bill and Donna Arnold
Damien’s on the Lake, 31 Lakeside Drive, Harveys Lake: R.J. Scouton
Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: DJ NRG
Executive Lounge at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: Frankie and Toby
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Area 52
Grotto Pizza/Grand Slam Sports Bar, RR 415, Harveys Lake: Shelly’s Underground
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Always Undecided
HEAT Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Inferno Drag Show
Karl Hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Miz & Mazer: An Intimate Evening of Songs and Storytelling
Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Nanticoke: Delta Thunder
Molly O’Shea’s at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Bill Hoffman
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: Kevin Riley, NuEra
Peppe’s Bistro, 100 Eagle Valley Mall, East Stroudsburg: Dashboard Mary
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: Lespecial with Rogue Chimp
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Ruth’s Chris Jazz Trio
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Better Than Bad
Wildflowers New York Bistro, 600 Wildflower Drive, Wilkes-Barre: Darren Frehulfer
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Derek Richards, Marc Yaffee and Marc Staudenmaier

Saturday, Oct. 6
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Chris Shrive
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Tommy Guns Band
Bean and Vine Cafe & Wine Bar at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Piano Night
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Doug and Sean
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Asialena
Border Bar, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: NEPA Kinkster Halloween with Tourniquet: Marilyn Manson Tribute
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam
Bradley’s Sports Bar, 462 W. State St., Larksville: Chester Avenue Band
Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: Dance Party
Hog’s Hollow Saloon, 1459 Route 93, Berwick: Psycho City
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: It’s the ’90s Baby with DJ Quoth
Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Nanticoke: Breakdown Jimmy
Molly O’Shea’s at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Graces Downfall Duo
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: Hostile Authority, Jessica Cruise and Banks
River Street Jazz Cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains Twp.: Solar Federation
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Ruth’s Chris Jazz Trio
Skytop Lodge, 1 Skytop Lodge Road, Skytop: Doug Smith Band
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Sugar and Spice
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Myal Soul
Windsor Inn, 669 Washington Ave., Jermyn: Dashboard Mary
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Derek Richards, Marc Yaffee and Marc Staudenmaier

Sunday, Oct. 7
HEAT Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Not Yo Granny’s Bingo
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Karaoke with DJ Huff

Monday, Oct. 8
Border Bar, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Whiskey Hill Project
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland

Tuesday, Oct. 9
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Know Limit Trivia
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland

Wednesday, Oct. 10
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Open mic night
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: DJ the DJ
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Bingo Night
Ole Tyme Charley’s Restaurant & Pub, 31 S. River St., Plains Twp.: Karaoke
OSE (Oak Street Express), 601 N. Main Ave., Taylor: DJ Edwin Velez Karaoke
Pour Boys Bar, 932 Wyoming Ave., Scranton: Village Idiots
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland

Fab 5 – October 4, 2018

Fab 5 – October 4, 2018

1. 10th Anniversary Fall Fest
Head over to Backyard Ale House, 523 Linden St., Scranton, for a weekend of food, music, beer and more.
More than 20 bands and DJs are lined up to play at the event where guests can sample beers from dozens of breweries. There also will be a chili cook-off, raffles, games and a hot dog-eating contest.
The event takes place Friday, Oct. 5, from 4 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; Saturday, Oct. 6, from 1 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; and Sunday, Oct. 7, from 1 to 9 p.m. Day passes cost $5 and can be purchased at the door. All-weekend passes are available $20 at backyardalehouse.com, and include admission for the entire weekend, a Fall Fest T-shirt, a beer tasting glass and a beer koozie.

2. Jake Owen
Enjoy the music of country musician Jake Owen, who’s known for songs such as “Barefoot Blue Jean Night,” “American Country Love Song” and “Alone With You.” He will hit the stage at Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Twp., on Thursday, Oct. 4. Special guests David Lee Murphy and Morgan Wallen also will perform.
Ticket prices start at $25.50 and can be purchased at the NBT Bank Box Office at the arena, on livenation.com or ticketmaster.com, or by calling Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000.

3. The Dunmore Cemetery Tour
Put on your walking shoes and bundle up when you come out to experience this award-winning walk through history, presented by the Dearly Departed Players at Dunmore Cemetery.
The tours will take place Sundays, Oct. 7 and 14, and will begin at 2 p.m. Exhibits will be on
display beforehand. The players will partner with Feed-a-Friend, and donation barrels for non-perishable food items will be on hand at cemetery gates.
The event is free, and no reservations are required. For more information, call 570-344-3819.

4. Boo at the Zoo
Fall has finally arrived, so it’s time to get into the Halloween spirit.
Claws ‘N’ Paws Wild Animal Park presents its third annual Boo at the Zoo on Saturday, Oct. 6, and Sunday, Oct. 7, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the park, 1475 Ledgedale Road, Lake Ariel.
Bring the whole family to enjoy a walk around the zoo and meet the park’s animals. Other activities at the event will include face painting, an animal parade and more. Snacks will be available as well.
Admission to the park costs $18.50 for adults, $13.50 for kids 2 to 11 and $17.50 for seniors.
For more information, call 570-698-6154.

5. Dwight Yoakam 
Singer, songwriter, musician and actor Dwight Yoakam brings his show to F. M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, on Friday, Oct. 5. Yoakam has sold more than 25 million albums worldwide since he began his career and has had 14 singles peak in the Billboard Top 10. As an actor, Yoakam has appeared in movies such as “Panic Room” and “Logan Lucky.”
The show starts at 8 p.m., and doors open at 6:30. Tickets cost $39.50, $59.50, $69.50 and $89.50 and can be purchased online at Ticketmaster.com at the box office. For more information, call 570-826-1100.

In living color Everhart to display artist Hunt Slonem’s work

In living color Everhart to display artist Hunt Slonem’s work

Scranton residents, meet your colorful neighbor.
Neo-expressionist artist Hunt Slonem, known for his vibrant and colorful paintings, bought the Col. Louis Watres Armory on Adams Avenue in 2015 and gave the space a multicolor makeover that includes bright wall treatments, quirky and rare items, antique furniture and dozens of his paintings. This month, his influence moves into another historic building in the Electric City when an exhibition of his paintings opens at the Everhart Museum.
On display Friday, Sept. 28, through Monday, Dec. 31, the exhibit kicks off with a artist reception today from 6 to 8 p.m. at the museum, 1901 Mulberry St. Tickets cost $50 and include light fare, cocktails and a tour of the exhibit. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 570-346-7186, ext. 510. 
Slonem is best known for the way he combines expressionist techniques with mysticism. He focuses on animal subjects, including bunnies and tropical birds in bright colors.
It’s a rare chance to see an influential artist’s work that the public has seldom seen, museum executive director Aurore Giguet said. Slonem’s work hangs in museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim. Now, the Everhart joins that list.
The Scranton museum will display large-scale paintings from early in Slonem’s career that were inspired by time he spent in Mexico, enrolled at Universidad de las Americas. There, Slonem explored archaeological sites of ancient Aztec buildings, which featured colorful and gold-painted canvases as well as pre-Columbian ceremonial objects.
“Hunt uses expressive textural brushstrokes of intense color to create light, playful compositions that are calming and joyful, and you can sense that he has a spiritual connection to the work,” Giguet said. “We are excited to show a series that has been hidden and unseen for many years.”
On Saturday, Sept. 29, Slonem will sign copies of “Gatekeeper: World of Folly,” which will be for sale at the museum along with the artist’s previous books, “Bunnies” and “Birds.” “Gatekeeper” is a 300-page walkthrough of the 102,000 square feet inside the Watres Armory that Slonem has transformed into a vibrant explosion of color, prints and textures. The book also highlights rare and precious items he accumulated over the years from around the world as well as what he calls “collectorating” — or collecting and decorating — that makes his sanctuary a sensory playground. The Everhart will host a dinner with Slonem inside his colorful castle in November, and while that already sold out, Giguet said the museum is thrilled to give residents a peek inside through the exhibit and book signing, as well as the chance to meet the man himself.
“What Hunt has done to the Watres Armory is truly amazing,” Giguet said. “It is a feast for the eyes, and his new book, ‘Gatekeeper,’ really captures the lush, extravagant interiors. It is our pleasure to hold a book signing and to invite the public to meet this remarkable force of nature.”
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Artist Hunt Slonem (AP Photo/Evan Agostini)

If you go
What: Hunt Slonem exhibition and book signing
When: Preview reception today, 6 to 8 p.m.; exhibition, Friday, Sept. 28, through Monday, Dec. 31; book signing, Saturday, Sept. 29
Where: Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton
Details: For more information, call 570-346-7186.

‘American Visionary: John F. Kennedy’s Life and Times’
A look at the 35th president of the United States will go on display inside the Everhart Museum’s Gallery 7 from Friday, Sept. 28, through Monday, Dec. 31. The exhibit, “American Visionary: John F. Kennedy’s Life and Times,” features a collection of photographs of President Kennedy’s public and private life. Curated from public sources to private family albums, some images are iconic, and others have never been seen before. A reception for the exhibit will take place next month.

Fab 5 – September 27, 2018

Fab 5 – September 27, 2018

1.  National Public Lands Day and Ice Cream Social
Grey Towers Heritage Association and the U.S. Forest Service will mark Community Appreciation Day and National Public Lands Day with a special event at Grey Towers National Historic Site, 151 Grey Towers Drive, Milford.
Taking place rain or shine Saturday, Sept. 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., the day will feature
self-guided mansion tours, music, children’s programs and more. A food drive will collect
non-perishable items.  Guests are encouraged to bring picnics, blankets and chairs for the lawn.
All activities are free. For more information, call 570-296-9630.

2. Taste of the Abingtons
Rotary Club of the Abingtons’ annual fundraiser returns for its 14th year on Sunday, Sept. 30.
Running from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Ramada, 820 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit, the event will feature food and wine tastings, music, entertainment and a silent auction. Tickets cost $25, and proceeds benefit many community projects. For tickets, contact any Rotarian. Visit the event’s Facebook page for more information.

3.  Chalkfest and Hydromania 
Help break the world record for the longest chalk drawing Saturday, Sept. 29, at the River Common, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre.
Chalkfest and Hydromania is free and will run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. All ages are welcome and can enjoy activities such as environmental education exhibits and a live mammal show at 11:30 a.m. Food trucks also will be on site.
A food drive will collect non-perishable food items for Weinberg Food Bank, and a voter registration drive also will take place.
For more information, visit riverfrontparks.org.

4. Scranton Latin Festival
All are welcome to this multi-cultural celebration on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 29 and 30.
Taking place on Lackawanna County Courthouse Square, the Scranton Latin Festival will feature music, food, a live DJ abd cultural performances. Featuring an anti-violence and anti-drug theme, the event aims to bring awareness to lives lost to violence and drugs and to people fighting addiction. Among those schedule to appear is Frank Little Bear, founder of the Red Visions Dance Troupe and Native American educator, who will present an interactive program on Native American heritage through dance, music, stories, art and more. Admission is free. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.

5. Devon Allman Project
Singer, songwriter and guitarist Devon Allman, son of the late Gregg Allman, will perform Friday, Sept. 28, at 8 p.m. at
F. M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre. Allman will play alongside an ensemble that includes percussionists John Lum and R. Scott Bryan, bassist Justin Corgan, guitarist Jackson Stokes and organist Nicholas David.
Special guest Duane Betts, son of founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, Dickey Betts, also will join the show.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25, $29 and $39, plus fees, and can be purchased at the box office, by calling
570-826-1100 and at ticketmaster.com.

City on the fringe – Scranton Fringe Festival returns with expanded schedule

City on the fringe – Scranton Fringe Festival returns with expanded schedule

A longer schedule aims to open up more opportunities for audiences to check out the variety of entertainment the Scranton Fringe Festival will bring to the city this month.
Expanding from five days to nine this year, the festival boasts activities ranging from improv and theater to film, dance and interdisciplinary work.
“We were trying to figure out how to have as many shows in the festival as possible with our resources available. … There’s only so many slots of time that you can put shows into, so pulling it apart like that really gives the audience a little bit more time to see things and also get involved a little bit earlier,” festival co-founder and managing director Elizabeth Bohan said.
The festival opens Saturday, Sept. 22, with the Big Gay Storyslam in Shopland Hall at Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Bohan expects the 8 p.m. show to sell out.
A few other activities will take place in the days following the storyslam, with most events happening toward the end of that week. The festival will hold a free preview party Wednesday, Sept. 26, at 6 p.m. at AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., and close Sunday, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m. with a free, all-ages wrap party.
Tickets cost $8 for festival button-holders and $12 for those without buttons. Buttons cost $5 and offer holders discounts at various local partners, which include downtown restaurants and boutiques. They are available at festival headquarters in the Leonard, 335 Adams Ave., and all button partners. For a list of partners and more information, visit
scrantonfringe.org.

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518 Lackawanna Ave.
“Artemisia’s Intent”: Thursday, Sept. 27,
6:30 p.m.; Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 4:30 p.m.; theater/solo, by the Anthropologists, featuring Mariah Freda; rated R; 60 minutes
“Here We Are in Spain’s Night (Or Late Afternoon Depending on What Day You Go) of Comedy”:
Friday, Sept. 28, 9 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 5 p.m.; improv; rated R; 60 minutes
“Goddamned”: Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 and 6 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; dance/movement;
rated R; 45 minutes
“Make Your Own Damn Sandwich!”: Saturday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; theater; rated PG-13; 60 minutes

AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave.
Preview party: Wednesday, Sept. 26, 6 p.m.;
rated PG; 120 minutes
“The Presented”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 5 p.m.; theater, starring Chris Davis; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“I Killed the Cow”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 6 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; solo/theater, By Larissa Marten and Leia Squillace; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“My Condolences: An Experiment in Grief Presented by the New Vintage Ensemble”: Friday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; theater; rated R;
60 minutes
“#VANLIFE”: Friday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 4:30 and 9 p.m.; theater, by Chalk & Cheese Productions; rated R; 60 minutes

Artworks Gallery, 503 Lackawanna Ave.
“The World Will Stop If We Make a Mistake”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 5 p.m.; interdisciplinary, performed by Sarah J. Stachura and Tim McDermott; videography by Brendan Regan; rated PG-13; 45 minutes
“Sound and Song: Oveone and Over-Sung”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; theater/musical, presented by C4 Studios; rated PG; 45 minutes
“From Plaid To Pork Chops… And Postcards To Paris”: Friday, Sept. 28, and Saturday, Sept. 29,
6 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; solo, starring Jeannine M. Luby; rated R; 45 minutes
“The Hugging Army 3.0: Connect Now!”: Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29,
4:30 p.m.; poetry/spoken word; rated PG-13;
45 minutes

The Bog, 341 Adams Ave.
“A Fringe-Tastic Electric City Boogie”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 9 p.m.; dance/movement; 21 and older; 90 minutes

Brennan Hall, Pearn Auditorium, University of Scranton
“Inside Mecca: Insights Along the Path of Abraham”: Sunday, Sept. 23, 3 p.m.; film by Anisa Mehdi; rated PG-13; 90 minutes
“Omega Male”: Monday Sept. 24, 6 p.m.; film, presented by the 411 Studio; created by Bob-A-Lou Productions; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“Charlie Chaplin’s Body”: Tuesday, Sept. 25,
6 p.m.; film by Jeff Boam; rated R; 60 minutes

Craftsman Hall, Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.
“Too Late for Help”: Thursday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m.; comedy featuring Ellen Doyle; rated R; 60 minutes
Scranton vs. the World Comedy Festival: Friday, Sept. 28, 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29,
9:30 p.m.; comedy from Laugh Out Lepkas Comedy LLC; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“Crime of the Hour”: Friday, Sept. 28, 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 6:30 p.m.; comedy hosted by Abby Deely; rated PG-13; 60 minutes

Junior Ballroom, Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.
“Fruit of the Sea”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 6 p.m.;
Friday, Sept. 28, 9 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29,
4 p.m.; musical/theater; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“Rejects Anonymous”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; theater/improv, created and performed by Double D; rated R; 60 minutes
“Hedy! The Life & Inventions of Hedy Lamarr”: Friday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 8:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 5 p.m.; theater/solo, written and performed by Heather Massie; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“Light // Sound”: Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; interdisciplinary/theater; rated PG-13; 60 minutes

Lackawanna County Children’s Library, 520 Vine St.
“We Are … The Children’s Library! A Visual Arts Experience”: on display Sept. 22 to 30; visual arts; rated PG; 90 minutes; free
Balloon workshop: Sunday, Sept. 23, noon;
Monday Sept. 24, 5:30 p.m.; with Miss Molly Balloons; rated PG; 90 minutes; free
Open mic night: Friday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m.; rated PG; 90 minutes; free
Playing Shakespeare: Sunday, Sept. 30, 1 and
4 p.m.; youth acting workshop; rated PG;
90 minutes; free

The Leonard (Scranton Fringe headquarters), 335 Adams Ave.
“The Comment Section”: Friday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, Sept. 29, 4 and 7:30 p.m.; theater, by David and Toni Jo Parmelee; rated PG-13; 45 minutes
“Good Joke/Bad Joke Bingo”: Friday, Sept. 28,
8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 6 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; theater/improv, presented by Bad Theater Fest of New York City; rated R; 60 minutes
“He’s Dead!”: Friday, Sept. 28, 6:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; theater/solo, by Grace Kapacs;
rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“The Ryan Case 1873”: Friday, Sept. 28, 11 p.m.; improv/theater walking tour; presented by Live in Theater; rated PG-13; 90 minutes
“A Spectacle & Mirth Cabaret”: Saturday, Sept. 29, doors open 10 p.m., show 11; cabaret, presented by Scranton Fringe; rated R; 90 minutes
Monologues That Impress: Saturday, Sept. 29, noon; workshop, with Carlo D’Amore
Teen playwright workshop: Saturday, Sept. 29,
2 p.m.; theater/spoken word presented by Scranton Fringe Festival in partnership with the Everhart Museum; grades seven through 12; rated PG; 90 minutes
Stand-Up Comedy Workshop: Sunday, Sept. 30, noon; workshop, with Ellen Doyle
Scranton Fringe Festival Wrap Party: Sunday, Sept. 30, 7 p.m.; all ages; free

Shopland Hall, Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.
Big Gay Storyslam: Saturday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m.; theater; rated R; 90 minutes
60X60 Dance Concert: Thursday, Sept. 27, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30,
5 p.m.; dance/movement, by Rob Voiseyo; rated PG; 60 minutes
“Rehabulous! The Lighter Side of Narcotics Recovery…”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 5 p.m.; theater/interdisciplinary; rated R; 90 minutes
“My Sister’s Keeper: A Poetic Stage Play”: Friday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 8:15 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3 p.m.; theater, by Jody Austin; rated PG-13; 90 minutes

The Space at Olive, 541 Wyoming Ave.
“Harper Lee: The Secrets of a Mockingbird”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 4:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 5 p.m.; theater/solo, starring Prudence Wright Holmes; rated R; 60 minutes
“Right Is the Price”: Thursday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; theater/improv, presented by Montrose Movie Theater; rated PG; 45 minutes
“An Interview with Peggy Guggenheim”: Friday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 and 6 p.m.; musical; rated PG-13; 60 minutes
“50 Shades of Gay”: Friday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 9 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; theater/musical, starring Ike Avelli, Chris Williams and Jeza Belle; rated R; 60 minutes

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 232 Wyoming Ave.
“Golden Avatar”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 6 p.m.;
Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.; theater, by Viva Kultura, featuring Ethan Smith; rated PG; 90 minutes
“Falkland — The War the World Forgot”: Thursday, Sept. 27, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 3:30 p.m.; theater, by Tasty Monster Productions, Heather Bagnall and Luke Tudball; rated PG-13;
60 minutes
“Just a Penny”: Friday, Sept. 28, and Saturday, Sept. 29, 6 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 2 p.m.; musical; rated PG; 60 minutes

Guitar aces bringing skills  to Scranton Cultural Center

Guitar aces bringing skills to Scranton Cultural Center

G.E. Smith’s storied career as a guitarist has earned him a number of accomplishments worth boasting about, from an Emmy award for his work as bandleader on “Saturday Night Live” to credits on studio albums by David Bowie and Mick Jagger to touring with Bob Dylan.
For the man born George Edward Haddad, it all started in Northeast Pennsylvania, where he was born in Scranton and raised in Stroudsburg.
On Friday, Sept. 21, Smith has a homecoming of sorts with a show at Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. “Masters of the Telecaster” also features guitarists Jim Weider and Tom Prinicipato, who each will play a set and join Smith in homage to the iconic instrument starting at 8 p.m.
During a recent phone interview from Long Island, New York, Smith recounted how his life changed when his mother bought him his first Fender guitar as an 11th birthday gift.
“We went to a store with used guitars, and there was a $100 one and a $200 one, and we got the $100 one,” he recalled. “Lucky for me, it turned out to be an old Fender Telecaster. It kind of really shaped my life. If we got a different guitar, things might not have gone the same way.
“Little things happen in our lives and change our direction, and we might not know it until years later. I’ve always played a Fender Telecaster.” 
From that fateful moment, Smith devoted himself to learning the ins and outs of creating sounds with his guitar. He got his start playing bars in and around the Stroudsburg area and later at resorts such as the former Mount Airy Lodge. He played songs from numerous eras and learned showmanship from an uncle who led a band in Scranton.
Smith’s own big break came with a six-year gig backing Hall & Oates on guitar, then fronting the live band on “SNL” from 1985 to 1995. During his time with the show, he was a familiar face on-screen and even helped compose pieces such as the theme for “Wayne’s World.”
When it comes to talking about his experiences playing with big guns such as Bowie, Dylan and Jagger, Smith said it was a natural place for him to blend into once he earned the spot.
“For some reason, ever since I was a kid, what I really enjoyed the most was playing behind a good singer. I never really wanted to be the front guy,” he said. “I wanted to be a sideman, somebody who was known that you can hire me and trust me to respect the song.
“That’s what was always important to me. So playing with those people, if you learn their music, you try to analyze, of course, the notes — but then you always want to get the feeling of what does this mean to them, and how can I best support that?”
His fellow featured performer Jim Weider has shared stages with his own list of top acts. The Woodstock, New York, native has toured with Keith Richards, Dr. John, Paul Butterfield, Dylan and Hot Tuna and played with the Band.
Tom Principato, meanwhile, is a standout blues frontman in his own right who hails from Washington, D.C.
“Each one of us gets a spot and picks things we’re gonna play,” Smith explained of the Scranton concert plan. “It’s a guitar-rific show. We do bluesy, rock kind of music. Up, dancing, fun kind of music. American music. There’s a little country flavor in there.”
Drummer/vocalist Randy Ciarlante and bassist/vocalist Lincoln Schleifer will join the three guitarists, rounding out the sound and helping them in their collaborative jamming. 
“I always thought of a band like a good basketball team. They don’t even really look at each other, they just throw the ball and know the other player is there. They make a pass,” Smith said. “We all know the basic outline, the road map of a song, but there’s places in there we can play off each other. That’s the most exciting part of music to me.”
Smith hopes to see some familiar hometown and distant relations in the Scranton audience as he shares his love for the Telecaster, but he expects a nice variety of musical tastes and ages in the crowd regardless.
“It’s always been important to me to always entertain people,” he said. “I like to go out there and play stuff that people can tap their feet to, that makes them think and feel good.
“A lot of other musicians aren’t the most socially adept, but you give them their instrument and they’re OK. They can communicate with that. That’s what I love about it. A lot of times people ask me, ‘Aren’t you nervous being up there in front of thousands?’ But when I put that guitar on, I’m not nervous anymore.”

Fab 5 – September 20, 2018

Fab 5 – September 20, 2018

1. ‘Rose’s Dilemma’
Delve into a romantic comedy by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Neil Simon on Saturday, Sept. 22, at the Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton.
Presented by the Clocktower Theater Company, the show will start at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7.
The story follows Rose Steiner, a writer who hasn’t written in years. As her need for money grows, she receives an opportunity from her late lover that could lead her back onto the path of success.
Tickets cost $20 to $28 and can be purchased online in advance at
clocktowertheater.thundertix.com and at the door. The show is open to ages 13 and older.
Visit thetheateratnorth.com for more information.

2. ‘Jump Jive & Jazz: A Salute to Jazz Drummers’
Swing on by Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., on Sunday, Sept. 23, to enjoy a night of live music.
Groups performing will include the Upper Valley Winds Big Band under the direction of Patrick Marcinko III, the Tyler Dempsey Trio and Erin Malloy performing alongside bassist Doug Smith and pianist Jim Waltich. The Bill Goodwin Quartet is the night’s special guest.
The show starts at 6:30 p.m. and seating is first-come, first-serve. Tickets cost $25 in advance and $30 on the day of the show. For tickets, visit ticketmaster.com or call 800-745-3000. For more information, call 570-344-1111

3. Third Friday Art Block
Stroll through downtown Wilkes-Barre as it springs to life with artists, vendors, music and more for the Third Friday Art Block on Friday, Sept. 21.
The event is free and open to the public from 5 to 8 p.m. A variety of venues will be open to stroll through, providing an opportunity to support the community’s local art scene.
Visit the art block’s Facebook page for more information.

4. ‘The Little Mermaid’
Swim on over to Phoenix Performing Arts Centre, 409 Main St., Duryea, to see “The Little Mermaid” starting this weekend.
Phoenix Kids will present the musical on Fridays, Sept. 21 and 28, and Saturdays, Sept. 22 and 29, at 7 p.m. and Sundays, Sept. 23 and 30, at 2 p.m. The family-friendly show will feature actors donning Heelys to glide across the stage.
Tickets cost $10 for general admission and $5 for children 5 and younger. For reservations or more information, call 570-991-1817 or visit phoenixpac.vpweb.com.

5. Woofstock
Join True Friends Animal Welfare Center for its biggest fundraiser of the year, Wooftstock, on Saturday, Sept. 22, from 1 to 6 p.m.
The event will take place at Lazybrook Park in Tunkhannock and feature live music performed by Paul LaQuintano, Tommy Guns Band, Orange and George Sobeck Acoustic Music. Food also will be available. Money raised will benefit the organization’s Wyoming County shelter.
Admission costs $10 in advance and $15 at the gate. Children 12 and younger and dogs receive free admission. For more information, call 570-278-1228 or visit truefriendsawc.com.

Easygoing ‘Outlaws’ Willie Nelson’s festival rolls into Pavilion at Montage Mountain

Easygoing ‘Outlaws’ Willie Nelson’s festival rolls into Pavilion at Montage Mountain

Harmonica player Mickey Raphael has stood by Willie Nelson’s side for 45 years. But no matter how much time passes, the view of the legend never gets old.
“From my vantage point, which is about six feet away, I’m a fan. At 85 (years old), Willie is still one of the most energetic guitar players there is,” Raphael said during a recent phone interview from Nashville, where he lives.
The longtime friends and collaborators come to town for the Outlaw Music Festival on Friday, Sept. 14. The concert, which also includes appearances by Van Morrison, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Lukas Nelson + Promise of the Real and Particle Kid, begins at 3 p.m. at the Pavilion at Montage Mountain, Scranton.
Watching the magic of Willie Nelson perform also keeps Raphael on his toes as a member of the band, thanks to the spontaneous nature of the classic country crooner’s style of playing.
“We don’t ever practice. It’s all improv. There’s no set list,” Raphael said. “The set follows a certain pattern, but we just follow Willie. He starts every song and then we come in, but he can change.
“He changes arrangements nightly, depending how he feels and how he reads the crowd. It’s a living, breathing thing.”
The fans in attendance hold sway over how the music progresses, too, Raphael noted. When the energy is high, the performers feed off their enthusiasm, and it affects the sets.
“When you have a crowd that’s present and involved, it pushes you to express yourself in different ways,” Raphael said. “You can look out there and see young people and older people — it crosses all generational lines — you can see that they’re getting into the music. There’s nobody sleepwalking through this thing.”
The easygoing vibe carries throughout Outlaw Music Festival, which originated in Scranton in 2016. This year’s collection of talent on stage, including much-celebrated Van Morrison, makes for a good time not just for the audience, but also for the artists, Raphael said.
“This tour is going to be great,” he said. “All the acts, they’re so much fun to watch that all the musicians are out there watching each other play. They’re not hanging out on tour buses.
“I start out just watching everyone else. Where can you see Van and Willie play? I grew up listening to Van Morrison. I’m such a fan. This is a whole day of music. Any one of these artists could play by themselves, but to have them all together in one venue on one day is a treat for everybody — not just the fans, but the musicians themselves.”
But as much as Raphael enjoys his point of view, he promised that nothing compares to being in the crowd before Willie Nelson when he’s in the moment.
“Willie is the kind of guy that when he’s singing, you feel like he’s singing right to you, and he is,” Raphael said. “He makes contact with the audience.”

Setting the stage – Fall under the spell of the Theater at North this season

Setting the stage – Fall under the spell of the Theater at North this season

From the glamour of old Hollywood to the charms of pop favorites on piano, the fall season of performances at the Theater at North will rock you.
The Scranton venue begins its slate of concerts, plays and more with its own trio of shows supplemented by an array of outside productions that make for a diverse season.
“We really tried to target a different and wider age range,” said Laurie Houser, director of theater operations since February.
First up is “New York, NY Dueling Pianos,” featuring professional musicians in a face-off of grand proportions, set for Saturday, Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m.
“It’s part-comedy, part-music, but really interactive. It’s more of a fun experience,” Houser said. “The audience gets to request songs of the performers, and they literally duel back and forth. It doesn’t appeal just to musicians; it’s for anyone.”
With hundreds of songs in the pianists’ repertoires, they can meet almost any request, covering a range of genres and artists, Houser added, from Billy Joel to Madonna to Maroon 5. 
“This is something a little different than a traditional tribute or play for our audience in Scranton,” she said.
On Saturday, Oct. 20, at 7:30 p.m., the Theater at North presents “Almost Queen: A Tribute to the Band Queen,” featuring four-part harmonies, intricate costumes and musicality that recreates the legendary rock group’s live shows.
“Queen is loved by everyone of all ages. I know people in their teens, 20s, 30s and even their 70s who love them,” Houser said. “It appeals to a large genre of people, and it seems like it’s never going out of style. It’s great timing for the movie (“Bohemian Rhapsody”) coming out (Nov. 2).”
For those who love the stylings of the Golden Age of Hollywood and Broadway, reminiscent of greats Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire, “Two on Tap: A Tribute to Song and Dance” comes to town on Sunday, Nov. 11, at 2 p.m.
“They’re a New York professional duo of actors and dancers who make their way through the classics, hitting on our theme of a little something for everyone,” Houser said of the show.
But guests will see some familiar faces on stage, too.
“We’re excited for that show that they’ve extended the offer to local dancers to participate in the second act in ‘Tea for Two,’” House said. “They’ll be sending out the choreography in the fall, and students from (Scranton) Civic (Ballet Company) and Ballet Theatre (of Scranton) get on stage and perform right alongside them.”
The rest of the season at the theater is rounded out by a trio of plays presented by Clocktower Theater Company, a big band tribute to Sinatra and several Christmas productions, among others. No matter the type of performance, Houser said audiences can expect quality entertainment.
“We’re bringing high-calibre talent to Scranton,” she said.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

If you go

“New York, NY
Dueling Pianos”
When: Saturday, Sept. 8, 7:30 p.m.; doors open at 7
Tickets: $25 to $35

“Almost Queen: A Tribute
to the Band Queen”
When: Saturday, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m.; doors open at 7
Tickets: $35 to $45

“Two on Tap: A Tribute
to Song and Dance”
When: Sunday, Nov. 11, 2 p.m.; doors open at 1:30
Tickets: $20 to $25

Additional fall shows
Saturday, Sept. 22: “Rose’s Dilemma,” presented by Clocktower Theater Company

Saturday, Nov. 3: “Lucky Stiff,” presented by Clocktower Theater Company

Thursday, Nov. 8:
“The God Box,” starring
Mary Lou Quinlan

Saturday, Nov. 24: Twelve Twenty-Four: The Holiday Rock Orchestra

Sunday, Dec. 2: Andy Cooney’s Irish Christmas Show

Friday, Dec. 7: “Sinatra’s Birthday Bash,” featuring Tony Sands and His Big Band

Sunday, Dec. 9: “Holiday Dance Showcase,” presented by 5 Star Dance Academy

Tuesday, Dec. 18, and Wednesday,
Dec. 19:
“A Christmas Carol,” presented by Clocktower Theater Company

All shows held at the Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Visit TheTheaterAtNorth.com for more information. Tickets available by calling 877-987-6487 or by visiting ticketfly.com or the box office, open Mondays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Thursdays, 3 to 6 p.m.; and Fridays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Fab 5 – September 6, 2018

Fab 5 – September 6, 2018

1. The Lords of 52nd Street tribute band
Come dance the night away at Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave., as the venue fills with music from players who have performed alongside Billy Joel.
Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. for the Lords of 52nd Street tribute band concert on Friday, Sept. 7. The Wanabees will open the show and play from 6:45 to 8:15 p.m. The Lords of 52nd Street then will take the stage at 8:30 and will feature saxophonist Richie Cannata, guitarist Russell Javors and drummer Liberty DeVitto.
Tickets cost $25, $30 and $45. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Guests must be at least 21 to attend.
For more information, call 570-343-3000.

2. Endless Mountains Fiber Festival
Learn all about the animals that provide the materials for your hats, gloves and scarves and pick up some supplies to make your own at the Endless Mountains Fiber Festival.
The festival will take place at the Harford Fairgrounds, 485 Fair Hill Road, Harford Twp., on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
More than 50 vendors will be featured, selling products that range from crafting materials such as fleece and yarn to finished garments and household products. Events will include educational demonstrations, contests and a silent auction. There also will be several breeds of goats, sheep and other animals on display.
For more information, including directions to the fairgrounds and a full event schedule, visit endlessmountainsfiberfest.com.

3. Alanis Morissette
Alternative rock singer and songwriter Alanis Morissette, a seven-time Grammy winner and celebrity guest mentor on “The Voice,” will perform on the outdoor summer stage at Mount Airy Casino Resort, Mount Pocono, on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. Doors will open at 5. Morissette is known her for songs such as “Ironic” and “You Oughta Know,” and she was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 2015. She has received 14 Grammy nominations as well as a Golden Globe nomination.
The concert is open to all ages and will happen rain or shine. Tickets cost $55, $65 and $75 and can be purchased at ticketfly.com. For more information, visit mountairycasino.com or call 877-682-4791.

4. Nicholson Bridge Day
Main Street in Nicholson will come alive with vendors and live entertainment for the annual Nicholson Bridge Day to celebrate a local wonder.The Nicholson Bridge, also known as the Tunkhannock Viaduct, is considered by some to be one of the “Engineering Wonders of the World.” The family-friendly event sponsored by the Nicholson Women’s Club will take place on Sunday, Sept. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and features vendors, music, food, games, raffles and more. For more information, call 570-942-6747 or visit the event’s Facebook page.

5. Bark in the Waterpark
Cool off with your four-legged friend at the second Bark in the Waterpark, presented by Puppy Paradise.
The event will take place on Sunday, Sept. 9, at Montage Mountain Resorts, 1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scranton, from noon to 6 p.m. Tickets cost $15 for all human visitors, however, dogs can swim for free.
For guests’ safety, dogs must stay leashed at all times and be current on their rabies vaccination and have proof available if questioned.Vendors, basket raffles, games and giveaways also will be part of the day. For more information, visit montagemountainresorts.com.

Clubs – September 6, 2018

Clubs – September 6, 2018

Thursday, Sept. 6
Bart & Urby’s, 119 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Trivia Night
Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Open mic with Big Al and Billy Edwards
Border Bar, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Open call hosted by Jami Kali
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam
Chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Kartune
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Bingo Night
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Know Limit Trivia
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Karaoke
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Poets
Levels Bar & Grill, 519 Linden St., Scranton: DJ NRG
Pour Boys Bar, 932 Wyoming Ave., Scranton: Jeff Lewis
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Music for Models Trio
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Ken Norton
Windsor Inn, 669 Washington Ave., Jermyn: Dashboard Mary
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Lab — Comedy Showcase

Friday, Sept. 7
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Bill Hoffman
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Karaoke
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Fake Uncle Jack Duo
Bean and Vine Cafe & Wine Bar at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Piano Night
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Strawberry Jam Duo
Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Dashboard Mary
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Edward “Terence” Swanton
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Dustin Switzer Duo
Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: DJ NRG
Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Leighann and Company
Grotto Pizza/Grand Slam Sports Bar, RR 415, Harveys Lake: 2 Rockaholix
Grotto Pizza/Skybox Sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Goodfellas Duo
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Inferno Drag Show
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Ripped Away, Roseblood, Rest in Piss
Karl Hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Elevate — An Evening of Drums & Bass Music
McGrath’s Pub and Eatery, 112 E. Main St., Dalton: Ken & Mark
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Tony Vergnetti and Robby Walsh
Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Nanticoke: Bounty Hunter
Molly O’Shea’s at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Tritide Duo
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Ruth’s Chris Jazz Trio
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Hoopla
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St.,
Olyphant: Erich and Tyler Music Co. and Riley Loftus
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Light Weight
Wildflowers New York Bistro, 600 Wildflower Drive, Wilkes-Barre: Third Degree Acoustic
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Scott Bruce with Chris O’Connor and Zach Pickert

Saturday, Sept. 8
279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Always Undecided
Backyard Ale House, 523 Linden St., Scranton: Static in the Attic
Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Shot of Southern
Bean and Vine Cafe & Wine Bar at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Piano Night
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Whiskey and Woods
Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: The Third Nut
Bradley’s Sports Bar, 462 W. State St., Larksville: Dead Giveaway
Breakers at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Flaxy Morgan
Cavanaugh’s Grille, 163 N. Main St., Mountain Top: Tori Viccica
Harry’s Bar, 302 Penn Ave., Scranton: DHD
Hog’s Hollow Saloon, 1459 Route 93, Berwick: Hog’s Fest
Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: The Gloom Trio Night with DJ Quoth
Karl Hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Gentlemen East and Dustin Douglas & the Electric Gentlemen
McGrath’s Pub and Eatery, 112 E. Main St., Dalton: D-West
Mendicino’s Pizza, Route 502, Covington Twp.: Jeff Lewis Duo
Molly O’Shea’s at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Cruise Control Duo
New Penny, 1827 N. Main Ave., Scranton: Kali Ma, the Cryptid, the Scripts and Gypsy-Valley Kings
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Ruth’s Chris Jazz Trio
Skytop Lodge, 1 Skytop Lodge Road, Skytop: Doug Smith Band
Streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Chatter
The Tauras Club, 106 W. Market St., Scranton: Friend of the Gypsy
Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Tatiana, Nothing Yet and the Boastfuls
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Militia
Wise Crackers Comedy Club at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Scott Bruce with Chris O’Connor and Zach Pickert

Sunday, Sept. 9
Heat Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Not Yo Granny’s Bingo
Karl Hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: The Nude Party

Monday, Sept. 10
Border Bar, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Whiskey Hill Project
Duffy’s Coffee Co., 306 S. State St., Clarks Summit: Open jam session
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland
The V-Spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Karaoke with DJ Huff

Tuesday, Sept. 11
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland

Wednesday, Sept. 12
BADS, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Open mic night
Benny Brewing Co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Know Limit Trivia
Ole Tyme Charley’s Restaurant & Pub, 31 S. River St., Plains Twp.: Karaoke
Pour Boys Bar, 932 Wyoming Ave., Scranton: Village Idiots
Ruth’s Chris Steak House at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland